How high should motor be when sitting on transom saver?

5/17/16 @ 3:21 AM
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jbird68
jbird68
USER since 1/24/05

My new boat was sitting about 11 inches past the end of my trailer when I purchased it. So,  i moved it up to where my Alumacraft manual says it should be. But now the lower unit of the motor sits pretty high off the ground. I haven't adjusted the transom saver yet. Is there a specific height the lower unit should be off the ground? My old boat didn't have a power trim on it. I feel that it sits way too far back from the trailer and my fear is that someone following too close may run in to it. Should I adjust the transom saver? 

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Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 Posts
5/21/16 @ 1:55 PM
ere
ere
USER since 2/22/07

If the transom saver is not attached to the boat when its in the water, how the heck would it have any effect on the performance.

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5/21/16 @ 1:43 PM
mattg589
mattg589
USER since 2/27/05

From the looks of it on the picture I think that yours could be adjusted down. On almost every boating/fishing website there are arguments over transom savers. I personally use Motor Mate http://motormateusa.com/ and highly recommend it if it's available for your particular motor. I have absolutely no affiliation with them besides being a happy customer. Once it's in place it makes my motor and boat rock solid with no movement and I don't have to worry about the transom saver beating up on my lower unit. 

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5/17/16 @ 7:03 PM
ayeFeesh
ayeFeesh
USER since 5/17/11

To the original poster, don't overthink things. There is no optimum height. Technically if you have enough ground clearance the best position would be to have your motor straight up and down- vertical. The next best position, in my opinion, is about 35-45 degrees.

Edited on 5/17/16 7:04 PM
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5/17/16 @ 11:23 AM
Cambridge
Cambridge
USER since 3/21/14

I'd keep it as low as possible.  Just high enough to keep it from hitting the ground if you'd ever blow a tire or go over a curb. The higher it is creates a larger stress moment on the mount on the motor mount. Lower it..

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5/17/16 @ 11:11 AM
Captain Andy Platko
Rough House
USER since 6/19/15

Yea i realize that but  i just didnt want to see him have the same trouble that i had with my boat when i put my transom saver on. It looked all to familiar to me. From the picture he supplied the motor is sitting to high for the boat to run optimally.  That was the reason we put the transom saver on was for trailering but that in turn gave us our trouble on the water.

Edited on 5/17/16 11:31 AM
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5/17/16 @ 10:49 AM
Tim Zwieg
Zwiegs
USER since 1/10/12

Captain Andy, he was asking about his transom saver for use when trailering .  The height of the motor on the transom will affect your speed and hole shot.  The fin you were referring to is called the cavitation plate, and that should be flush with the bottom of the boat,

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5/17/16 @ 10:23 AM
Captain Andy Platko
Rough House
USER since 6/19/15

I had a transom saver on my sea nymph and had a bunch of trouble getting adequate speed because the motor was sitting to high on the transom and the prop wasn't low enough in the water.  We maxed out the adjustment on the transom saver and still was not able to get it setup right. With the motor setup I had the lower unit wasn't long enough to use with it so we ditched the transom saver and just attached the motor to the transom like normal and now we're good to go. Ideally you want the fin above the prop to be close as you can inline with the bottom of the boat. If you can adjust your motor down to accommodate that

you'll save yourself a lot of headache. 

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5/17/16 @ 7:27 AM
Tim Zwieg
Zwiegs
USER since 1/10/12

I don't beleive that there is a specific height that the motor should ride.  However in your picture your motor does appear to be sitting pretty high, if it were mine I would lower it.  There are two thoughts on transom savers.

1. First school of thought is if you support your motor it reduces stress on the transom when drving down the road. 

2. Second school of thought is the only function of a transom saver is to prevent your motor from hitting the ground should your hydrolics fail.  That if your transom can handle the stress of a big motor pounding across the lake, it certainly can handle the stress of a highway.

I used to be in the fiorst camp, and have since bought into the second one.  Bottom line I use a transom saver, but it does not sit as high as your in the picture, I would adjust that transom saver.


Edited on 5/17/16 11:03 AM
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