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CURRENTLY 67°
PARTLY CLOUDY
WINDS NORTH @ 8MPH
HUMIDITY 70%
VISIBILITY 7MI
DEW POINT 56°

Bass Lake

Barron County, WI
Barron County, WI
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Bass Lake is a 19 acre lake located in Barron County. It has a maximum depth of 19 feet. Fish include Panfish and Largemouth Bass.
19 acres
LAKE SIZE
19 feet
MAX DEPTH
FISH TO CATCH
Largemouth Bass
Panfish
NOTE: This list may not be all inclusive of all speices present in Bass Lake.
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BOTTOM COMPOSITION
RESTRICTIONS
  • Catch and release fishing for largemouth and smallmouth bass is open year round unless otherwise noted.
  • Motor Trolling is allowed with up to 3 hooks, baits, or lures, per angler.
AREA SERVICES
FISHING OUTLOOK
CHANNEL CATFISH
Very Good VERY GOOD
The channel catfish population is doing well both in quantity and quality. Fish up to 8 pounds are surveyed most years. A total of 39 channel catfish were collected while electrofishing in 2016 (7 fish/hr). Channel catfish collected in 2016 measured from 8.5 – 21.5” and weighed up to 3.7 lbs. Anglers can catch channel catfish in the warmer months using bottom fishing techniques near deadfalls and woody debris with cut bait, shrimp, chicken livers or night crawlers. The largest channel catfish ever collected by electrofishing measured over 27” and weighed 9 lbs.
CRAPPIE
Improving IMPROVING
Lake Sangchris contains both black and white crappie. The black crappie are a strain originally brought in from Arkansas in 1985 that have a ¼” wide black stripe running from just under the chin up over the nose to the dorsal fin. They are called black-nosed or black-striped crappie by anglers and are a beautiful and a prized sportfish. The crappie population is still developing at Lake Sangchris. The 2014 fish population survey showed dramatic increases in both black and white crappie numbers, but the 2016 survey showed lower catch rates. However, the general trend in crappie numbers over the last 10 years is positive trend. White crappie ranged from 8 – 12.5”, while black crappie ranged from 5 – 12.5”. The majority of the crappie collected in the 2016 fall survey measured over the 10” minimum length limit. The population structures are still not yet within management goals. Natural spawning may be limited due to sporadic water temperatures during the spawning season.There has been evidence of natural reproduction in the past, but it doesn’t seem to be consistent, therefore the crappie stocking program will continue until populations are stable. White and black crappie have been raised in the Lake Sangchris rearing pond since the ponds' construction in 1992. The pond was out of service for 4 years due to a bad leak, but it has been rehabilitated and is currently back in use. Brood black and blacknose crappie were stocked into the rearing pond in spring 2015, and the pond was harvested in fall 2016. We stocked approximately 13,000 black crappie averaging 5.8”. Brood blacknose crappie will be stocked into the rearing pond in spring 2017. Anglers can catch crappie on hundreds of submerged Christmas trees and other structures within the entire lake with spinners, jigs and minnows year round. A 16 ½”, 3 pound black crappie was recently brought to the biologist for weighing and identifying! Site Regulation: 10" minimum length limit; 10 fish per day limit. '>Site Regulation: 10" minimum length limit; 10 fish per day limit.'>Lake Sangchris contains both black and white crappie. The black crappie are a strain originally brought in from Arkansas in 1985 that have a ¼” wide black stripe running from just under the chin up over the nose to the dorsal fin. They are called black-nosed or black-striped crappie by anglers and are a beautiful and a prized sportfish. The crappie population is still developing at Lake Sangchris. The 2014 fish population survey showed dramatic increases in both black and white crappie numbers, but the 2016 survey showed lower catch rates. However, the general trend in crappie numbers over the last 10 years is positive trend. White crappie ranged from 8 – 12.5”, while black crappie ranged from 5 – 12.5”. The majority of the crappie collected in the 2016 fall survey measured over the 10” minimum length limit. The population structures are still not yet within management goals. Natural spawning may be limited due to sporadic water temperatures during the spawning season.There has been evidence of natural reproduction in the past, but it doesn’t seem to be consistent, therefore the crappie stocking program will continue until populations are stable. White and black crappie have been raised in the Lake Sangchris rearing pond since the ponds' construction in 1992. The pond was out of service for 4 years due to a bad leak, but it has been rehabilitated and is currently back in use. Brood black and blacknose crappie were stocked into the rearing pond in spring 2015, and the pond was harvested in fall 2016. We stocked approximately 13,000 black crappie averaging 5.8”. Brood blacknose crappie will be stocked into the rearing pond in spring 2017. Anglers can catch crappie on hundreds of submerged Christmas trees and other structures within the entire lake with spinners, jigs and minnows year round. A 16 ½”, 3 pound black crappie was recently brought to the biologist for weighing and identifying! Site Regulation: 10" minimum length limit; 10 fish per day limit.
FLATHEAD CATFISH
Very Good VERY GOOD
Flathead catfish are difficult to survey, but anecdotal evidence suggests angler catches are becoming more common. Lake Sangchris is now over 50 years old and is developing a reputation for producing flathead catfish weighing over 40 lbs. The largest flathead ever collected in a survey weighed 69 pounds and the largest caught by an angler weighed 81.45 pounds, which is the current state record. Flathead catfish exceeding 40 pounds are harvested every year. We collected 1 flathead measuring 14” and weighing 1 pound during the 2016 fall fish population survey. Anglers can catch flathead catfish using live bait such as minnows, sunfish, shad, or crayfish around submerged logs and deadfalls in the warmer months and deep holes in the colder months.
LARGEMOUTH BASS
Very Good VERY GOOD
Lake Sangchris is known for its high density bass population with electrofishing surveys. We collected a total of 627 bass (108/hr electrofishing) ranging from 5 – 20.5” and weighing up to 5.2 lbs. Our survey showed that 47% of the catchable population measured over 12”, 18% measured over the minimum length limit of 15”, and 5% measured over 18”. Less than desirable body condition of largemouth bass seems to be normal for this cooling lake. Hot water discharge into the lake may cause largemouth bass to burn more energy than they can consume during the hot summer months. Gizzard shad have exhibited erratic spawns in Lake Sangchris in the past and threadfin shad survival is dependent on power plant operation in the winter. Breeder threadfin shad are often stocked in an effort to offset the results of winter kills. Anglers can catch largemouth bass on points, deadfalls, and stickups within the entire lake year round with plastic worms, jigs, spinners, crank baits, minnows, crayfish and worms. The largest bass ever collected by electrofishing measured 22” long and weighed over 7 lbs! Site Regulation: 15" minimum length limit; 3 fish per day limit.
STRIPED BASS
Very Good VERY GOOD
Pure striped bass are non-native and have been stocked into Lake Sangchris every other year since 1983 when available. The striped bass stocking program has produced some great fishing opportunities. Past surveys have shown that the lake has not produced many fish over 20 pounds, but there is a good density of striped bass up to 14 pounds. Anglers can catch stripers near “striper point” located in the northern portion of the lake in the warmer months and in the hot water middle arm of the lake when water is being discharged in the winter. Anglers can catch stripers using large spinnerbaits, crankbaits, spoons, jigs, crayfish or large minnows. The current state record of 31 pounds 7 ounces was caught at Lake Sangchris! Site Regulation: No limit under 17; 3 fish a day over 17" limit.
PLACES TO SAY
STAY 22: Bass Lake
NOTICE: Lake-Link Inc assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions of the information for Bass Lake. Although we strive to provide the most accurate information as we can the information contained in this page is provided on an "as is" basis with no guarantees of completeness, accuracy, usefulness or timeliness.
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