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Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County

Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County
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DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 1,450 POSTS
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8/14/19 @ 3:57 PM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (99%)
Waxing Gibbous
CONDITIONS
Partly Sunny
WATER TEMP
71° - 75° F
AIR TEMP
71° - 75° F
Rich Simak
Rich Simak
User since 6/3/11

The peak water temperatures of the summer are now behind us. Expect bass and walleye populations on Hayward's clear water lakes to continue to edge deeper.  Currently the 20 foot depth is a good target depth for beginning your search. Thorough sonar searching will reveal some deeper or shallow. The pictured smallmouth are 2 of 3 over 20 inches for this outing.

Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
8/9/19 @ 11:13 PM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (71%)
Waxing Gibbous
CONDITIONS
Sunny
WATER TEMP
76° - 80° F
AIR TEMP
71° - 75° F
Rich Simak
Rich Simak
User since 6/3/11

Cooling days and cool nights have musky moving in the weeds on Hayward area lakes. If you get bright days work the deep edges by dropping your baits' running depth.

Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
8/6/19 @ 9:55 AM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (39%)
Waxing Crescent
HLVCB
Hayward Lakes VCB
User since 6/3/08

Excerpts from the August 5, 2019; Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Aside from a chance of thunderstorm Wednesday, the forecasts indicate a very nice week through the weekend. Daytime highs in the 70s are perfect for outdoor activities and nighttime lows around 50 degrees make for very good sleeping weather. If you are waiting for better conditions, well... good luck with that! Enjoy all the North Woods has to offer! 

“Consistent weather brought on good days for anglers to be on the Quiet Lakes,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “but do not forget the bug repellent! “The most successful fishing right now is in deeper, cooler waters, with angler having success fishing mid-lake structure in 12-20 feet. “Musky action is improving and anglers are seeing a lot of following fish, but with few successes. Mid-size baits with varying retrieval speeds fished on weed edges and humps work best. Warm water temperatures make it increasingly important to handle and release fish with care. “Walleye fishing is good, depending on the time of day fishing. Early morning and late evening into dark are the best times for walleye when they come shallow to feed. Live bait, minnows, leeches and crawlers, and small crankbaits are all taking fish. “Back bays are still providing some good action for northern pike and largemouth bass. “Panfish anglers are catching nice mixes of crappie, bluegill, and perch. Fish leeches and small minnows on slip bobbers over drop-offs and mid-lake humps in 12-17 feet.” 

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says fishing remains solid with the stable weather patterns. “Musky action is improving with the cooler nights. Anglers fishing bucktails and topwaters on deep weed edges and bars are getting some nice fish. “Walleyes are relating to deep weeds, humps, and cribs. Slip bobbers and jigs are the best way to target these fish and leeches and crawlers in 10-20 feet should get bites. Some fish are relating to mud flats. Try trolling crawler harnesses and crankbaits to cover water, and Jigging Rapalas work great once you locate the fish. “Bass action remains quite good and wacky worms, swim jigs, creature baits, and topwaters should get some fish. For largemouth bass, target cover and weed edges. For smallmouth bass, target gravel and rock bars. “Crappies and bluegills are biting, with bluegill reports slightly better than for crappie. Weed edges, cribs, and bogs are all producing decent catches at the right times.” 

Mike at Jenk’s says the Chippewa Flowage is at full pool, with water temperatures in the mid 70s. “Musky action is improving and anglers are catching fish with various techniques that include trolling Mattlocks and other large crankbaits and fishing suckers in deep water beneath bogs. Surface baits and bucktails are effective in early morning and later evening hours. If the water is calm during those hours, using Creepers and Hawg Wobblers would be a good idea. “Walleyes are active, but the average size remains small. Look for bigger fish on the deeper breaklines in 8-14 feet. During the day, try various techniques in deeper water. Trolling Flicker Shads, 3-way crankbait rigs, and bottom bouncing crawler rigs are all good over deep cover. “Northern pike action is unusually slow, though anglers are catching a few, with most success on spinnerbaits and spoons in the weeds.“Crappie fishing is primarily on bogs in the evening with crappie minnows, Crappie Scrubs, and Gulp!, and make sure to try various depths under the bogs.” 

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses the Namekagon River’s possible biggest ever year class. “The Namekagon River, particularly between Hayward and Cable, supports a fantastic brown trout fishery. The DNR has stocked trout in this reach of the Namekagon in the past, but in recent years, natural reproduction, exclusively, has supported the population. “Each year, in July/August, the DNR conducts electrofishing surveys from Tag Alder Road to Larsen Road to check on abundance of adults and ‘young of year’ trout born in spring. “The 2019 survey found 461 young of year per survey mile, more than three times the long-term average for the site and almost double that of 2010, the second highest year. Conditions in fall/winter 2018-19 were apparently very good for trout spawning and egg survival. “Anglers getting excited about a super abundant trout fishery should understand there are still many bottlenecks where small trout can perish before reaching adulthood. “Cannibalism can diminish large year classes of brown trout and little browns are currently one of the most abundant food items in the river for larger browns. In addition, any number of environmental factors could limit survival of this year class as well, including summer heat, extreme winter cold, drought, or sustained high flow events. “Competition for food and feeding areas among the members of this abundant year class will be fierce, with many that lose out in the competition perishing. “Still, despite the long-road these trout must travel to get big enough to take a large hopper fly, it is exciting to see such a big year class coming into the mix.” 

This Saturday, August 10, Flambeau River State Forest is celebrating Smokey Bear’s 75th birthday from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the Connors Lake picnic area. The event offers educational programs, programs for children, games, cake – and a visit with Smokey! For more information, call (715) 332-5271. 

FISHING REPORT

Musky: fishing is slowly improving as we move toward the fall months (yikes!) Concentrate on deeper weed edges, humps, bars, and bogs. Bucktails, crankbaits, and topwaters are all producing fish, as are trolling larger crankbaits and live suckers. The trick is matching your offerings to their desires. 

Walleye: fishing is good if you fish the right times and/or places, with shallower water during low light conditions most productive. During the day, fish deeper weeds, humps, breaklines, and mudflats. Depths can range from 6-20 feet and deeper. Leeches, crawlers, and minnows on jigs and slip bobbers are catching fish, but so are trolled crankbaits, minnow baits, and crawler harnesses. Jigging Raps are productive once you find the fish. 

Northern Pike: fishing is a bit slow, though fish are still active. Look for them in and on the edges of weeds and near panfish concentrations in shallow to mid-depths. Best baits include spinner, spinnerbaits, spoons, and live bait. 

Largemouth Bass: fishing is good to very good on shallow to mid-depth weeds, weed edges, brush, bogs, stumps, slop, and other heavy cover. Top bait choices include plastic worms, creature baits, swim jigs, spinnerbaits, and assorted topwaters. 

Smallmouth Bass: fishing is good on rock, gravel, and other mid-depth to deeper hard bottoms areas. Swim jigs, crayfish color plastics in various configurations such as worms, tubes, and creature baits, and topwaters are all working well. 

Crappie: fishing is fair to good, with best action in the evening hours. Fish are holding near/in/on weeds, weed edges, drop-offs, mid-lake humps, cribs, and bogs in 10-20 feet. Baits of choice include crappie minnows, panfish leeches, Crappie Scrubs, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small jigs and plain hooks, fished with or without slip bobbers. 

Bluegill: fishing is good to very good. Look for them on weeds and weed edges, mid-lake humps, cribs, and bogs in 10-20 feet. Waxies, worms, leaf worms, crawler chunks, and plastics on small jigs under slip bobbers will all catch fish.

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.


8/1/19 @ 12:46 PM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (1%)
Waxing Crescent
CONDITIONS
Sunny
WATER TEMP
71° - 75° F
AIR TEMP
76° - 80° F
Rich Simak
Rich Simak
User since 6/3/11

Cooler weather has moderated water temperatures. Many more bass and walleye have been showing up on the main lake structures of Hayward's clear water lakes. Look for fish at the 20 foot depth of weed edges and rock reefs.

Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
7/30/19 @ 10:25 AM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (3%)
Waning Crescent
HLVCB
Hayward Lakes VCB
User since 6/3/08

Excerpts from the July 30, 2019; Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Should the forecast hold true, this will be a beautiful week in the North Woods, with clear skies, mild summer temperatures, and only “slight” chances for rain on the weekend. Check below for a number of events you can enjoy!

"We are transitioning into summer patterns and fishing remains positive,” says Pat at Happy Hooker.  “The Quiet Lakes are providing some good catches, with anglers finding fish on sharp breaks off weed edges in 10-16 feet. Slow trolling or drifting is producing walleye, northern pike, and smallmouth bass, and the morning and late afternoon bites are improving.  “Fish are seeking cooler shaded waters off shore and under shade. Structure areas to target should include mid-lake islands, humps, reefs, steep breaks, and docks. It is important to plan your outings to fit the best bite times of early morning, late afternoon, and evening.  “Musky action is picking up, with some anglers finding success when casting mid-size spinnerbaits on shallower mid-lake humps. Look for musky angling pressure to increase through the remainder of the open water season, especially during early morning and evening hours.  “Panfish continue to be easy targets in the shallows and near shoreline vegetation. Small minnows and soft plastics fished under bobbers are taking a variety of year classes, but the bigger fish seem to bite best in late afternoon.”  

Jim and Cathy at Minnow Jim’s say Nelson Lake walleye anglers should use Rapalas, Beetle Spins, fatheads, crawlers on harnesses, and leeches. “To get the attention of northern pike and largemouth bass during these high temperatures, warmer water conditions, anglers should cast baits with more plop, splash, flash, and rattle. In addition, do not be afraid to use larger spoons with trailing tails, as well as buzz and chatter baits. Try larger stickbaits might normally use and toss swim jigs and frogs into weed beds.  “For panfish anglers targeting crappie and bluegill, minnows, waxies, crawler chunks, and Gulp! Alive will all work in bog and crib areas.”  

Mike at Jenk’s says the Chippewa Flowage remains full, with the water temperature 73-76 degrees. “Musky action slowed, but anglers are still catching fish. During cooler water temperatures in early morning and evening, use bucktails and surface baits, and expect to see more fish shallow. Trolling Mattlocks and other larger crankbaits are best during daylight hours. “Walleyes are biting, but average on the small side. With the cooler temperatures, fish breaklines and weed edges in early morning and evening. During daylight, work leeches and crawlers in cover in 18-25 feet. For trollers, Flicker Shads, Flicker Minnows, and Shad Raps are solid choices.  “Northern pike action is somewhat slow. Try fishing spinnerbaits and weedless spoons in weeds in 7-8 feet.  “Smallmouth bass activity somewhat rebounded from a slow down. Anglers should target stumps and rocks and cast imitation craws, spinners, and frogs. If shallow action is slow, try crawlers in the cribs.  “The crappie bite is primarily on bogs at night with crappie minnows and plastics, particularly one-inch Gulp! Emerald Shiner minnows. During the day, fish deeper cribs and sand saddles”  

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses public meeting for the Big Chetac management plan. “Anglers who fish Big Chetac Lake should mark Aug. 15 on their calendars and plan to attend a DNR public input session for the Chetac Chain, including Big Chetac and Birch lakes, which is part of developing the fishery management plan.  “The DNR has already developed similar plans for Lac Courte Oreilles, Nelson, Chippewa Flowage, Grindstone, Round, Moose, and Teal/Lost Land lakes.  “Angler input is a critical component of developing these plans. Anglers tell us which species they value and how they want to see the DNR manage that species in terms of catch and release vs. harvest, and trophy vs. action fisheries.  “Using that input, DNR fisheries biologists can create measurable goals and objectives that are in line with angler preferences and then apply the best tools available to steer the fishery towards meeting those goals.  “This meeting is August 15, starting at 6 p.m., at Birchwood School in Birchwood. If you fish the Chetac Chain, please attend and make your voice heard!”  

The DNR will not issue sharp-tailed grouse hunting permits for the fall 2019 hunting season due to concerns over future viability of the population in Wisconsin. By state law, sharp-tailed grouse do retain game species status. For more information, search “sharp-tailed grouse” on the DNR website.

The 60th Annual Lumberjack World Championships runs Thursday through Saturday, August 1-3, showcasing the best in sawing, chopping, speed climbing, log rolling, boom-running, and more! For more information, including ticket pricing and availability, seating options, parking, and more, call (715) 634-2484).

FISHING REPORT

Musky: action is improving for bigger fish, with early morning and late evening into dark best. Fish are holding on shallow to mid-depth breaklines, weedlines, and mid-lake humps. Cast medium bucktails, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, and topwaters, or troll Mattlocks and other big crankbaits during daylight hours.  

Walleye: action is good to very good, with best success in low light early mornings and late afternoon hours into after dark. Look for fish on weeds and weed edges, breaklines, humps, and other structure out to 30 feet. Work deeper water during the day, moving shallower for the low light periods. Leeches and crawlers on jigs, slip bobbers, harnesses, spinner rigs, and split shot rigs work well, as do Beetle Spins and stickbaits, and Jigging Raps in deeper areas. Trolled Flicker Shads and Minnows, and Shad Raps are also catching fish.  

Northern Pike: fishing is fair to good and improving with the somewhat cooler weather. Work on, over, along, and in shallow to deeper (5-18 feet) weeds, weed beds, and weedlines, and wherever you find schools of panfish. The most effective baits include spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, swim jigs, stickbaits, crankbaits, buzz baits, and topwaters.  

Largemouth Bass: fishing is good to excellent, with fish locating on weeds and weedlines, breaklines, brush, bogs, and cribs. Top producing baits include spinner, spinnerbaits, spoons, swim jigs, buzz baits, chatter baits, stickbaits, various plastics, and topwaters.  

Smallmouth Bass: action is fair to good and improving. Fish are holding in 8-18 feet and deeper on weed edges, stumps, humps, rocks, cribs, breaklines, and other cover. Best baits include spinners, assorted plastics such as tubes, worms, frogs, and crayfish imitations, crawlers, and topwaters, early and late hours offering the best chances for success.  

Crappie: fishing is good to very good when you locate them, with best success early and late in the day. Look for fish on shallow to mid-depth (and deeper) weeds, humps, breaklines, bogs, and cribs. Best baits include crappie minnows, crawler pieces, waxies, plastics, and various Gulp! baits on jigs and plain hooks, with or without bobbers.  

Bluegill: fishing is good to very good in and on the edges of shallow to mid-depth weeds, weed beds, brush, bogs, and cribs. Waxies, worms, crawler pieces, small minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits fished on jigs and small hooks, with or without bobbers, are all effective baits.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992. 

7/26/19 @ 8:25 AM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (34%)
Waning Crescent
HLVCB
Hayward Lakes VCB
User since 6/3/08

Excerpts from the July 22, 2019; Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

The forecast “promises” fine weather until toward the end of this week when it mentions chances for rain and/or thunderstorms. Warm days and comfortable nighttime lows make for perfect summer weather. Get out and enjoy it!

“With challenging conditions such as we had last week,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “anglers must adapt to conditions and try different tactics. For now, slow-drifting worms and leeches off deeper breaks in 10-15 feet during early morning and late afternoon into dark is producing a wide variety of species. “Muskies remain a puzzle, with big fish not overly active. Anglers report big fish following lures, but disappearing at the boat, and figure 8s bring no results. This should change when water temperatures cool. Anglers currently report surface temperatures around 82 degrees.  “Walleyes are now nocturnal, seeking the deepest holes during daylight hours. If you are after walleye, fish in early morning and late evening into dark. Jigging minnows, leeches, and crawlers will produce, and night fishing is best with a lighted bobber. “Northern pike and largemouth bass still roam the shallows and if you fish in the heat of the day, target these species. Spinnerbaits, swim baits, rigged worms, and artificial frogs will all take these fish.  “Panfish anglers fishing live bait under bobbers near vegetation and steep breaks are catching good numbers of fish. For the most part, panfish are roaming near the coolest waters, especially on hotter days. Jigs and plastics in shallower water will turn fish in early morning and late afternoon and evenings, and slow trolling is becoming more productive.”  

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says fishing is a bit challenging with the warm weather, but he is hearing some good reports. “Musky action is sporadic, but anglers are making decent catches, with most casting jerkbaits and bucktails on deep weedlines and bars.  “Walleye action is good on most lakes and fishing leeches on slip bobbers along weed edges and main lake humps is a good bet. Anglers are also catching some nice fish with crawlers on bottom bouncers in 10-25 feet, depending on the lake and structure.  “Bass action is solid, with both largemouth and smallmouth offering great opportunities. For largemouth, work thick vegetation with weedless worms and frogs. For smallmouth, focus on rock bars and deeper cabbage with topwaters, swim jigs, and jerkbaits.  “Panfish anglers are also doing well and plastics and leaf worms under slip bobbers should get some bites. Look to deeper water for bigger fish.”  

Mike at Jenk’s says the Chippewa Flowage remains at full pool, with water temperatures in the high 70s to low 80. “Musky and other species moved deeper due to the water temperature. Muskies could come up for baits trolled at 9-13 feet, but try deeper when applicable. Mattlocks and larger Jakes and Grandmas are solid choices. For casting, try jerkbaits and Cowgirls on the south end, as it receives less direct sunlight than the north end. Round Lake anglers report success trolling the deep edges off Hinton Bay’s shoreline.  “Walleye fishing is difficult, so do not get stuck fishing your ‘usual’ spots. Trolling over deep cover is effective, but run baits deeper than usual. Try adding a Flicker Minnow or other deep diver to your spread. Leeches and crawlers on 1/4-oz. jigs and Lindy Rigs are effective, as are three-way crankbait rigs trolling along at 1-2 mph over deep water.  “Northern pike fishing is slow due to the water temperature, but you might hook one while fishing walleye or musky in deeper water.  “Bass fishing is also quiet, with few reports in the past week. Try fishing crawlers in the cribs.  “For crappies, crappie minnows and plastics are the way to go. Bog fishing in the early morning and at night is still successful, but during the day, check out deeper cribs and brush piles.”  

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses recent survey results relating to fishing in Wisconsin. “The DNR recently completed a statewide comprehensive outdoor recreation plan with broad goals to increase participation in outdoor recreation and provide those opportunities for Wisconsinites. Within the plan are many great statistics on how the people of Wisconsin enjoy the outdoors, including many insights about fishing.  

“According to public surveys completed as a part of developing the plan, fishing makes the top five outdoor activities, with walking/hiking, hunting, bicycling, and camping rounding out the top five list. “The survey found 40 percent of Wisconsinites enjoy shore fishing or fishing from a pier on lakes as the most common means of fishing. Next was fishing from a boat/canoe/kayak on lakes with 37 percent, ice fishing at 23 percent, fishing streams or rivers from shore at 21 percent, and 20 percent of anglers enjoy fishing streams or rivers by boat. A majority of anglers responding to the survey fished less than 10 days a year – and those who fish more than 30 days a year were relatively rare.  “The report listed reasons people choose to spend time outdoors, which included exercise, being with family, and observing scenic beauty.  

“For those who have concerns about the future of fishing, the reasons people choose not to get outside may be more revealing. The top reasons people do not participate more in outdoor recreation were ‘too busy with family responsibilities,’ ‘outdoor recreation equipment is too expensive,’ ‘do not have anyone to participate with,’ and ‘do not have the skills to participate.’ “Those last two should be a call to action for anyone with a passion and skill for fishing. Pass it on!”  

Sawyer County Outdoor Projects & Education (SCOPE) is offering a DNR Hunter Education course that will meet August 6, 8, and 13 at Hayward Middle School. The August 6 class begins with registration at 5:30 p.m. and class from 6-8:30 pm. A Saturday August 10 class meeting at Hayward Rod & Gun Club will run from 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. The $10 fee includes all materials and bonus items. Participants must attend all class sessions and pass written and hands-on tests. Successful students receive a hunting vest complements of SCOPE, a distinctive embroidered emblem, and a hunter education certificate. These courses fill quickly and require advanced registration by emailing scope4youth@hotmail.com with your name, age, and phone number. You will receive additional information by e-mail. For more information, visit www.sawyercountyoutdoors.com, or call (715) 558-5371 or 558-1633.

FISHING REPORT

Musky:  action is fair for big fish that continue to avoid most offerings. Anglers report big fish follows, but no takers. Target weedlines, bars, humps, gravel, and shoreline edges in or adjacent to deep water. Bucktails in various sizes, jerkbaits, gliders, crankbaits, and stickbaits all work, or try trolling Jakes, Grandmas, Mattlocks, and similar baits.  

Walleye: action is fair/good, especially considering the warm weather, with best chances for success in low light early morning, late evening, and after dark. During the day, jig, cast, or troll deep weeds, weed edges, humps, and other structure out to 30 feet. Fish shallower cover during early and late into dark hours. Top baits include minnows, leeches, and crawlers on jigs, split shot rigs, bottom bouncers, Lindy Rigs, and slip bobbers, and trolled crankbaits and stickbaits.  

Northern Pike: fishing is fair. Try in, over, and along the edges of thick weeds, both shallow and deep. Spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, swim baits, and live bait will all pique the interest of northerns. As always, fish deeper with larger baits for trophy pike.  

Largemouth Bass: fishing is good to very good, with fish holding in and around shallow slop to mid-depth weeds, brush, and other structure. Best bass baits include spinners, spinnerbaits, swim baits, weedless worms and frogs, and topwaters.  

Smallmouth Bass: fishing is fair to good on deeper cribs, cabbage, rock, gravel, and other hard bottom areas. The most productive baits include crawlers, tubes, plastic worms, jerkbaits, swim jigs, and topwaters.  

Crappie: fishing is fair to good, with best action in early morning and late afternoon into evening hours. Look for fish in and around mid-depth to deeper weeds, breaklines, cribs, bogs, and brush. Try somewhat shallower early and late in the day. Use crappie minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small jigs, and small spinners.  

Bluegill: fishing is good to very good in and around shallow to mid-depth weeds, docks, brush, and other cover. Early morning and late afternoon into evening are the most productive times. Go deeper for larger ‘gills. Standard bluegill baits such as waxies, leaf worms, crawler chunks, plastics, and Gulp! baits on jigs and under slip bobbers all catch fish.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992. 

7/18/19 @ 5:30 PM
grindstone
User since 8/6/09

Bassnation 1 there are a lot of beautiful lakes to kayak, if i wanted to catch fish late July or early August I would fish the Namekogon River upstream from Trego. You might use Jacks to livery your kayaks. The river is a trout stream for much of its lenght but turns stained upstream of Trego. There are SM in all the fishy looking places and they willingly bite. Warm lake water scatters the SM midsummer. They are there but wo electronics and a OB you'll find that they are difficult to locate. The wind if its blowing will push them up on the rock bars shallower than most might think. Fishing in the wind in a kayak is tough. The other river I consider a must paddle is the Brule about an hour N of Hayward way more trout than bass but spectacular water

7/17/19 @ 3:39 PM
FISHING REPORT
MOON PHASE (99%)
Waning Gibbous
CONDITIONS
Partly Sunny
WATER TEMP
76° - 80° F
AIR TEMP
81° - 88° F
Rich Simak
Rich Simak
User since 6/3/11

Water temps are flirting with the 80 degree mark on Hayward's clear water lakes. A significant percentage of the game fish population is suspended over deep water basins. Fish can still be found on rocks and deeper weed edges. Keep moving and use sonar to locate fish before fishing. Rock structures around the 20 foot level are holding some smallmouth. 

Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
7/17/19 @ 7:52 AM
Norskies
User since 6/26/17

Anyone know if Minong Flowage (lake Nancy) is any good for fishing?

Looking for bass, Walleyes, gills and pike.

trying out in a week, any help would be apprecaited.

Thanks

7/17/19 @ 7:37 AM
Weekend Pro
User since 1/7/16

Bassnation,

Check your PM

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