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WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY:Winter Weather Advisory issued October 20 at 10:19AM CDT until October 20 at 7:00PM CDT by NWSLEARN MORE
CURRENTLY 30°
SNOW
WINDS SOUTHEAST @ 11MPH
HUMIDITY 100%
VISIBILITY 0MI
DEW POINT 30°
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Allie is located in Renville County, Minnesota. This lake is 509 acres in size. It is approximately 12 feet deep at its deepest point. When fishing, anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Black Bullhead, Bluegill, Brown Bullhead, Channel Catfish, Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Walleye, White Crappie, Yellow Bullhead, Yellow Perch, Pumpkinseed and.
509 acres
LAKE SIZE
12 feet
MAX DEPTH
8 feet
AVG DEPTH
4.6 miles
SHORELINE
ACCESS
Boat Ramp
FISH TO CATCH
Black Bullhead
Black Crappie
Bluegill
Brown Bullhead
Channel Catfish
Green Sunfish
Largemouth Bass
Northern Pike
Walleye
White Crappie
Yellow Bullhead
Yellow Perch
Carp
Fathead Minnow
Golden Shiner
Hybrid Sunfish
Johnny Darter
Orangespotted Sunfish
Pumpkinseed
White Sucker
NOTE: This list may not be all inclusive of all speices present in Allie.
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HISTORY AND STATUS OF FISHERY

A standard survey (summer gill netting and trap netting) was conducted at Allie in 2015 to evaluate the lake's fish population. Walleye were the primary management species, while northern pike, black crappie, and bluegill were listed as secondary management species in the lake management plan. Winterkill was rare at this lake with the latest event occurring in 2008, but fish populations can fluctuate greatly when these events do occur. In 2015, the water clarity was fair. A fishing pier was present at the Allie Lake County Park on the west side of the lake. Curlyleaf pondweed, an invasive aquatic plant, can be somewhat abundant at this lake, especially in May and June.

Gill nets sampled high numbers (146) of walleye for a catch rate of 24.3/net, which was above the normal range for this type of lake, and the highest ever measured at Allie. The 2008 catch rate was 4.9/net. Past catch rates, from 1976 to 2015, were variable, ranging from 0.0/net to 24.3/net with an average of 6.2/net. In 2015, gill netted walleye were 10.4 to 23.3 inches long with an average of 13.7 inches. Approximately 89% of the gill net catch was 12 inches or longer and 30% were 14 inches or longer, indicating a quality size structure. Gill netted walleye were 1 to 11 years old with 5 year-classes present. Age-1 fish (18) corresponded to a year when fry were not stocked in Allie, accounting for 12% of the gill net sample and indicated that natural reproduction was occurring. For fish that were aged, all other year-classes from both gill net aged fish (88%) and trap net aged fish (100%) matched up with years when walleye fry were stocked. However, those year-classes could actually be from stocking, natural reproduction, or some combination of both. The 2013 year-class was very strong, accounting for 74% of the gill net catch. Growth was moderate for Allie Lake walleye. The latest walleye fry stocking regime (509,000 fry two-out-of-three years) was initiated in 1994. Gill net catch rates during this time period (2000, 2005, 2008, and 2015) ranged from 4.9 to 24.3/net with an average of 12.6/net, possibly indicating a successful stocking strategy.

Gill nets sampled low numbers of northern pike (10) for a catch rate of 1.7/net, which was within the normal range for this type of lake. The 2008 catch rate was 0.8/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were mostly low, ranging from 0.2/net to 4.0/net with an average of 1.8/net. In 2015, gill netted northern pike were 16.4 to 29.8 inches long with an average of 21.2 inches. Northern pike were not aged in 2015, but the size distribution indicated that multiple year-classes were present. Northern pike were last stocked in 2008, following a winterkill. A lack of quality spawning habitat was likely a limiting factor on northern pike at Allie Lake. Northern pike also tend to do better in lakes with clearer water and moderate amounts of submergent vegetation throughout the year.

Gill nets sampled low numbers (29) of yellow perch for a catch rate of 4.8/net, but this was within the normal range for this type of lake. The 2008 catch rate was similar at 5.9/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.2/net to 161.5/net with an average of 34.2/net. Yellow perch have not been sampled in high numbers since the 1987 assessment (161.5/net). In 2015, gill netted yellow perch were 6.5 to 10.1 inches long with an average of 8.7 inches. Approximately 37% of the gill net catch was 9 inches or longer, which should appeal to yellow perch anglers.

Gill nets sampled low numbers (7) of channel catfish for a catch rate of 1.2/net. The 2008 catch rate was 2.1/net. Historic gill net catch rates from 1976 to 2015 ranged from 0.0/net to 4.0/net with an average of 1.4/net. In 2015, channel catfish were 10.2 inches to 26.6 inches long with an average of 16.6 inches. Size distributions indicated that multiple year-classes were present. Allie was last stocked in 1989, so all of the channel catfish were likely the result of natural reproduction.

Gill nets sampled low numbers (7) of black crappie for a catch rate of 1.2/net, which was below the normal range for this type of lake. The 2005 and 2008 catch rates were also low at 1.0/net and 1.1/net, respectively. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.0/net to 95.5/net with an average of 19.2/net. In 2015, black crappie were 6.3 to 7.2 inches long with an average of 6.8 inches. Trap nets sampled 3 black crappies for a catch rate of 0.3/net, which was below the normal range, and the lowest ever measured at Allie. The 2008 (1.1/net) and 2005 (1.4/net) trap net catch rates were also low. Historic trap net catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.3/net to 75.9/net with an average of 23.6/net. Allie Lake may not be a large enough lake to support both high numbers of walleye (24.3/gill net) and black crappie, leading to the current imbalance. Adult walleye may be preying on young black crappie, limiting their recruitment.

Trap nets sampled low numbers (18) of bluegill for a catch rate of 2.0/net, but this was within the normal range for this type of lake. The 2008 catch rate was also low at 3.8/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.4 to 492.0/net with an average of 76.1/net. Bluegill were 3.2 to 9.3 inches long with an average of 5.6 inches. Approximately 28% of the trap net catch was 8 inches or longer, indicating that quality-sized fish were present. The stocking of 14 pounds (126 fish) of bluegill in 2008, following the winterkill, failed to increase the 2015 catch rate and produce a significant fishery at Allie Lake. Quality habitat; clear water and moderate amounts of submergent vegetation throughout the year, was likely limiting the Allie Lake bluegill population.

Gill nets sampled low numbers (6) of common carp for a catch rate of 1.0/net, which was within the normal range for this type of lake. The 2008 catch rate was 7.7/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.0/net to 7.7/net with an average of 2.7/net. Gill netted common carp were 4.2 to 27.8 inches long. The 2015 trap net catch rate was high (57.1/net), which was well above the normal range and the highest ever recorded at Allie. This likely indicated that a strong year-class was produced in 2014 or 2015. The 2008 trap net catch rate was 3.6/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.6/net to 57.1/net with an average of 8.3/net. Trap netted carp were 2.8 inches to 27.95 inches long with an average of 6.1 inches. Common carp have likely had negative impacts on the aquatic plant community at Allie Lake for many years.

Trap nets sampled low numbers (1) of black bullhead for a catch rate of 0.1/net, which was below the normal range for this type of lake. The catch rate in 2008 was 0.0/net. Historic catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were variable, ranging from 0.0/net to 380.3/net with an average of 72.4/net. The trap netted black bullhead was 7.3 inches long. Gill nets sampled low numbers (1) of black bullhead for a catch rate of 0.2/net, which was below the normal range and the lowest ever recorded at Allie Lake. The 2008 catch rate was 0.3/net. Catch rates from 1976 to 2015 were highly variable ranging from 0.2 to 309.6/net with an average of 108.5/net. The gill netted black bullhead was 7.9 inches long. Both trap net and gill net data indicate that some type of ecological shift had happened to the black bullhead population over the last 15 to 20 years. High numbers of predators (walleye and channel catfish) may have contributed to low numbers of black bullhead in Allie Lake.

NOTICE: Lake-Link Inc assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions of the information for Allie. Although we strive to provide the most accurate information as we can the information contained in this page is provided on an "as is" basis with no guarantees of completeness, accuracy, usefulness or timeliness.
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