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CURRENTLY 36°
OVERCAST
WINDS WEST @ 12MPH
HUMIDITY 91%
VISIBILITY 10MI
DEW POINT 33°

Bad Axe

Hubbard County, MN
Hubbard County, MN
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Bad Axe is located in Hubbard County, Minnesota. This lake is 303 acres in size. It is approximately 39 feet deep at its deepest point. When fishing, anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Bluegill, Brown Bullhead, Largemouth Bass, Muskie, Northern Pike, Rock Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Yellow Bullhead, Yellow Perch, Pumpkinseed,.
303 acres
LAKE SIZE
39 feet
MAX DEPTH
19 feet
AVG DEPTH
5.2 miles
SHORELINE
ACCESS
No ramp
FISH TO CATCH
Black Crappie
Bluegill
Brown Bullhead
Largemouth Bass
Logperch
Muskie
Northern Pike
Rock Bass
Smallmouth Bass
Walleye
Yellow Bullhead
Yellow Perch
Banded Killifish
Blackchin Shiner
Blacknose Shiner
Bluntnose Minnow
Cisco (Tullibee)
Golden Shiner
Hybrid Sunfish
Iowa Darter
Johnny Darter
Mottled Sculpin
Pumpkinseed
Spottail Shiner
White Sucker
NOTE: This list may not be all inclusive of all speices present in Bad Axe.
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HISTORY AND STATUS OF FISHERY

Bad Axe Lake is located in central Hubbard County, north of the town of Emmaville. Bad Axe has a surface area of 271 acres and a maximum depth of 39 feet. There is no public access. Bad Axe provides angling opportunities for northern pike, black crappie, bluegill, and largemouth bass.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has classified Minnesota's lakes into 43 different types based on physical, chemical, and other characteristics. Bad Axe is in lake class 25. Other area lakes in this same class include Big Mantrap, Little Mantrap, Eagle, Island, Belle Taine, and Spider.

Present and past surveys have shown that the northern pike population in Bad Axe fluctuates from low to moderate numbers. Northern pike abundance (2.0 pike/gillnet) was below the range "typical" for this lake class. Surveys from 1982 to 2000 had higher northern pike abundance, with gillnet catch rates fluctuating within the range "typical" for this lake class. Anglers will find that the proportion of large northern pike (> 28.0 inches) is high when compared to other area lakes. Northern pike exhibited fast growth rates when compared to other class 25 lakes. Muskellunge are present in Bad Axe and have been sampled in past surveys in low numbers. Bad Axe was stocked with muskellunge by the DNR from 1950 to 1969. Private, permitted stockings of muskellunge were done in 2002, 2005, and 2007 by the lake association. Success of these muskellunge stockings is unknown, as angler reports have been very limited.

Bad Axe has an abundant panfish population of black crappie, bluegill, and pumpkinseed. Present and past surveys have shown black crappie and bluegill abundance to be above the range "typical" for this lake class. Anglers will find a healthy black crappie population with fish in the 9-12 inch size range. Bluegill and pumpkinseed tend to run smaller, with fish in the 6-8 inch size range. Yellow perch are also abundant in Bad Axe; however, average size is small (7.2 inches). A few larger yellow perch are present with perch measured up to 11.3 inches.

Both largemouth bass and smallmouth bass are present in Bad Axe, with largemouth bass being the more abundant of the two species. No specialized sampling for bass such as spring electrofishing has been conducted on Bad Axe. Largemouth bass catch rates with gillnets and trapnets are above the range "typical" for this lake class, similar to past surveys. Smallmouth bass were not sampled in 2010, but have been sampled in past surveys in low numbers. Bad Axe has good water quality, submerged and emergent vegetation that provides excellent habitat for bass.

Other species sampled included high numbers of white sucker, and moderate numbers of rock bass and yellow bullhead. Brown bullhead were sampled in low numbers.

INVASIVE SPECIES
  • Eurasian Watermilfoil

Recreational activities such as recreational boating, angling, waterfowl hunting, and diving may spread aquatic invasive species. Some aquatic invasive species can attach to boats, while others can become tangled on propellers, anchor lines, or boat trailers. Many species can survive in bilge water, ballast tanks, and motors or may hide in dirt or sand that clings to nets, buckets, anchors, and waders. Fortunately, completing simple steps can prevent the transport of aquatic invasive species.
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NOTICE: Lake-Link Inc assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions of the information for Bad Axe. Although we strive to provide the most accurate information as we can the information contained in this page is provided on an "as is" basis with no guarantees of completeness, accuracy, usefulness or timeliness.
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