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CURRENTLY 37°
FAIR
WINDS SOUTH @ 17MPH
HUMIDITY 67%
VISIBILITY 10MI
DEW POINT 27°

Black Bear

Crow Wing County, MN
Crow Wing County, MN
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Black Bear is located in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. This lake is 215 acres in size. It is approximately 48 feet deep at its deepest point. When fishing, anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Black Bullhead, Bluegill, Brown Bullhead, Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Rock Bass, Walleye, Yellow Bullhead, Yellow Perch, Pumpkinseed and.
215 acres
LAKE SIZE
48 feet
MAX DEPTH
0 feet
AVG DEPTH
3.5 miles
SHORELINE
ACCESS
Boat Ramp
FISH TO CATCH
Black Bullhead
Black Crappie
Bluegill
Brown Bullhead
Green Sunfish
Largemouth Bass
Northern Pike
Rock Bass
Walleye
Yellow Bullhead
Yellow Perch
Banded Killifish
Blackchin Shiner
Blacknose Shiner
Bluntnose Minnow
Bowfin
Central Mudminnow
Cisco (Tullibee)
Common Shiner
Golden Shiner
Hybrid Sunfish
Iowa Darter
Johnny Darter
Least Darter
Pugnose Shiner
Pumpkinseed
White Sucker
NOTE: This list may not be all inclusive of all speices present in Black Bear.
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AREA SERVICES
HISTORY AND STATUS OF FISHERY

Black Bear Lake is a fair distance from any major roads and the long access road in probably discourages many non-local anglers from fishing this lake. Development on the lake is restricted to the north and south ends of the lake, while State and County land preserves much of the lake as undeveloped. The aquatic plant community, which grew to a depth of 18 feet in 1998, is fairly diverse. These plants are extremely important to maintaining a healthy aquatic environment. Emergent plants, like bulrush, cattail and wild rice, which are quite numerous, are important for shoreline protection, regulating nutrient levels, and they provide essential spawning habitat for northern pike, bass and panfish. Submerged plants provide food and cover needed by fish and other aquatic species.

The two most abundant species in 2010 were largemouth bass, which were sampled by electrofishing, and tullibee (cisco). Both were caught in high numbers. Average size of the bass was 11.5" and 43% were 12" or larger. Tullibees are an important forage fish for the northern pike in the lake. Average size of the tullibee was 12.4". Even with abundant tullibee, the northern pike population was just average and size was on the small side, with an average length of only 18.6". Black crappies, which were seen in decent numbers while electrofishing for bass in the spring, weren't sampled well in nets.

Other fish species sampled included bluegill, bowfin (dogfish), brown bullhead, green sunfish, hybrid sunfish, pumpkinseed, rock bass, white sucker, yellow bullhead, and yellow perch. Various minnow species were also sampled while backpack electrofishing and seining, including a pugnose shiner, which is a species of concern.

INVASIVE SPECIES
  • Zebra Mussel

Recreational activities such as recreational boating, angling, waterfowl hunting, and diving may spread aquatic invasive species. Some aquatic invasive species can attach to boats, while others can become tangled on propellers, anchor lines, or boat trailers. Many species can survive in bilge water, ballast tanks, and motors or may hide in dirt or sand that clings to nets, buckets, anchors, and waders. Fortunately, completing simple steps can prevent the transport of aquatic invasive species.
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NOTICE: Lake-Link Inc assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions of the information for Black Bear. Although we strive to provide the most accurate information as we can the information contained in this page is provided on an "as is" basis with no guarantees of completeness, accuracy, usefulness or timeliness.
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