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CURRENTLY 18°
FAIR
WINDS NORTHWEST @ 8MPH
HUMIDITY 93%
VISIBILITY 10MI
DEW POINT 15°
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Elbow is located in Becker County, Minnesota. This lake is 985 acres in size. It is approximately 76 feet deep at its deepest point. When fishing, anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike and Walleye.
985 acres
LAKE SIZE
76 feet
MAX DEPTH
ACCESS
Boat Ramp
FISH TO CATCH
Bluegill
Largemouth Bass
Northern Pike
Walleye
NOTE: This list may not be all inclusive of all speices present in Elbow.
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HISTORY AND STATUS OF FISHERY
Elbow Lake continues to support a diverse fishery containing several popular gamefish and panfish species including walleye, northern pike, black crappie, largemouth bass, bluegill, and tullibee (cisco). Although this lake is regularly stocked with walleye fingerlings, the walleye population seems to be driven by natural reproduction. Recruitment from stocking or natural reproduction has not been especially good during the past few years and catch rates of walleye in Elbow Lake reflect this. Stocking strategies may be altered in the near future in attempt to bolster the walleye fishery toward the long range management goal. Although walleye abundance appears to be lower than normal for this lake, the average walleye size has increased. Walleyes sampled in 2006 averaged 19.7 inches and 2.9 pounds. Northern pike catches continued to be higher than normal for Elbow Lake. Catch rates have been higher since the mid 1980s than they were prior to that time. These fish averaged about 2.3 pounds each. Sampled pike were generally young with good growth rates. Test net catches of bluegill remained several times as high in 2006 as they were in years before 1988. Bluegills averaged 4.6 inches and only two over eight inches were caught in the sample of 560 fish. Higher abundances of bluegills were accompanied by slower growth rates in 2006. Shoreline owners are encouraged to use good land stewardship practices to protect the water quality, the fishery, and property values on Elbow Lake. Shoreline buffer zones of native vegetation are especially helpful for reducing erosion. Aquatic vegetation should be left intact as much as possible. Emergent plants like bulrush and cattail are particularly valuable as fish spawning, rearing, and feeding areas, along with reducing shoreline erosion and absorbing nutrients and pollutants. Anglers are encouraged to release medium and larger fish and keep smaller ones for eating to sustain balanced fish populations. Northern pike under 24 inches should be harvested and larger ones should be released to control the overabundance of smaller pike and improve the overall health of the fish community.

NOTICE: Lake-Link Inc assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions of the information for Elbow. Although we strive to provide the most accurate information as we can the information contained in this page is provided on an "as is" basis with no guarantees of completeness, accuracy, usefulness or timeliness.
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