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felons/hunting

10/10/19 @ 7:58 AM
ORIGNAL POST
Capt. Ahab
User since 1/28/02

wondering if a convicted felon can be in a pop-up blind and deer hunt(gun) with his own son just as an observer?

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 18 POSTS
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10/12/19 @ 4:17 PM
no-luck
User since 12/14/12

Edge, the person being punished is the felon.


Black powder, from two google searches:

Federal law does not prohibit felons from owning an antique firearm. ... Any muzzle loading rifle, shotgun, or pistol made to use black powder or black powder substitute and which cannot use fixed ammunition is considered to be an antique firearm. 


For your question, yes, muzzleloading guns can be legally purchased, possessed and used by those convicted of felonies (your state and local laws may vary, so check them out. This answer pertains to federal law.). For legal purposes, muzzleloaders are not legally classified as firearms.

10/12/19 @ 11:42 AM
One shot one kill
MEMBER since 8/12/02

And possibly black powder.  I've heard that both ways . But yesterday I was at Fleet Farm and asked about black powder pistols . They do not require a background check . So they may be OK .

10/12/19 @ 11:28 AM
oncebitten
oncebitten
User since 12/7/17

Not sure. But I think that his only option for actually hunting is archery I don't know where I heard that or if there is any truth to that. 

10/12/19 @ 8:45 AM
no-luck
User since 12/14/12

Good question and good answers, good work..

10/11/19 @ 2:51 PM
Bomar1
User since 12/30/09

He can not be in a house, ice shanity, deerblind, automoblie if there is firearms present.


10/11/19 @ 2:46 PM
BeerTownFyreman
User since 6/15/01
10/11/19 @ 12:07 PM
nemab-man
User since 7/5/11

If  the kid is old enough to posses the gun without supervision then I don't see how anyone but your P.O. could stop you but I can't imagine why you would mention it to them. You still have rights. One of the enumerated rights in article one of the Wi. State constitution is the right to hunt, fish, and trap game. You also retain the rights to free travel and freedom of association. You might want to read your state constitution. Even if you have a firearms prohibition they cannot prevent you from calling, decoying , or pursuing game which all falls under the definition of hunting. All you need from the state is a hunting license.

Now, if it were me I would not ask for permission from anyone, much less a state agency. I don't ask the State for permission to practice my legal rights. That would be  insult to Liberty IMO.


10/10/19 @ 12:05 PM
PimplySwede
User since 1/6/09

I agree with the others - based on the information provided, it really should depend on the "kid's" age.

Under 18, the gun is not legally his/hers, and you'd have a hard time convincing a warden that you borrowed it from someone.  Even if you actually did, I would bet they consider YOU the responsible handler of the gun.

Mentored hunt (kid hasn't had hunters safety class) - the "mentor" must have a valid hunting license (I just found this out last weekend for the youth hunt).  That rules a felon out.

The only conceivable way you wouldn't get in trouble is if your "kid" is over 18, and the gun is his/hers.

I'll be interested in hearing what you found out.

10/10/19 @ 10:00 AM
hockeyguy39
User since 8/24/07

Good point regarding age.

I know the DNR is a law enforcement agency, but I would definitely ask the county sheriff's office and/or the district attorney's office. 

10/10/19 @ 9:12 AM
Capt. Ahab
User since 1/28/02

thank you guys...excellent feed back...going to contact the dnr to get a hard line on this...thanks again...:)

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 18 POSTS
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