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Pelican Lake, Oneida Co

1/21/20 @ 2:33 PM
ORIGNAL POST
Warp_N
Warp_N
User since 1/21/20

Hello, fellow pelican lake anglers. New to posting Lake Link.Reading the reports page and seeing all the discussion over the years, I thought a page over here could open up a little more on the topic of fish numbers and lake status/conditions and leave the report page for reporting. I fish the lake about a total of 20-30 days a year as my folks have a cottage on the water, fished it growing up as well. I agree, BIG changes over the years. Weed growth and panfish numbers most notable too me. I’m not opposed to the installation of fish habitat-cribs. They can be death traps for fish but we would need to protect the panfish that are exposed to exploitation. I believe protection of panfish is long overdue on this lake anyway. 15 total only 10 of one species is my thought. With the lack of weed cover for young panfish to hide in it will be a long recovery if at all. As far as the Rustys, I have noticed that their numbers are not what I remember. Are they cycling down with weed growth? Seems that would make sense.  I look forward to reading thoughts on improving this lake, look forward to posting reports of increasing success in the future. Disappearing bobbers to all.

Warp

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 12 POSTS
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2/8/20 @ 11:16 AM
wallywood
User since 1/1/02

What happens to those prime spawners 20-24'' during spearing time ?

2/8/20 @ 9:54 AM
Gillespie
User since 2/6/19

The majority of ceded territory lakes have a walleye daily bag limit of 3.  Only one can be 24"+ and none from 20-23.9".

2/7/20 @ 5:59 PM
wallywood
User since 1/1/02

Iceman, I was referring to all the lakes up north, a straight 2 fish limit instead of the 0-3 limit on individual lakes. I realize the DNR sets the limits on how bad the lakes are speared, but they are setting those on Native warden numbers.

2/6/20 @ 9:27 PM
Iceman81
User since 1/18/20

that's the limit already

2/4/20 @ 3:00 PM
wallywood
User since 1/1/02

Nihsif, don't hold your breath on changes with the tribal spearing. Since its a Federal issue, nobody has the stomach to touch it. The only way the tribes would stop would be a boycott at there casinos, which we both know will not happen. Its sad that Wi. ceded area lakes are no longer a destination for many serious walleye anglers ( including myself ). I really believe most hook and line fishermen would support a 2 fish limit if the practice of spearing would stop.

2/3/20 @ 11:52 PM
nihsif
nihsif
MEMBER since 6/15/01

I'm just so amazed at how the official DNR stance is that the spearing allowed by some federal judge has had absolutely NO affect on any of the lakes opened up for spear harvesting... and how in no way is spearing EVER used as leverage in politics...

plus I'm also amazed by the supporters of spearing claim it's the average Joe fishers that are the real problem...

Hope I'm around when these people get it right 

2/3/20 @ 11:16 PM
Iceman81
User since 1/18/20

how does one get the ball rolling to change limits


1/22/20 @ 12:07 PM
wallywood
User since 1/1/02

I used to icefish Pelican quite a bit 15-25 years ago. My friend retired in the area and we sometimes fished with Roger Bremmer from the bait shop. We did well with Perch and Gills during the day and would pick up some eyes after dark. Even back then the lake got pounded with hundreds of people fishing it on a weekend. The previous posts seem to document the problems in great detail for Pelican and other northern Wi. lakes

1/22/20 @ 11:16 AM
toothycritter
toothycritter
User since 7/9/01

I have been fishing Pelican since 1992 I fish it approximately 80 days a year. The wis dnr stopped stocking walleyes in 1983 the Indians started spearing that year musky stocking stopped in 1998 after the property owners ass. Voted at their annual meeting to stop stocking. Dnr now stocks muskies again in odd years. What is happening on Pelican is and has been happening on many other lakes. The Dnr doesn’t have the manpower or money to do much so if we want the lake better it’s something that people who use the lake will have to do and good luck with that. I was at one time a member of property owners ass but that ass is a joke. It’s not just one or two things causing decline of fish populations 

Toothycritter 

1/21/20 @ 9:31 PM
mudbay1969
User since 1/20/20

if I may run through a time line and see who agrees and disagrees.

1970s every summer you would see huge schools of young of the year perch and black clouds of bullhead babies all summer long moving along the shore lines. you also couldn't miss the 3-4-5 inch ribbon leaches that would swim by on a regular basis. hump back perch were common(jumbos)and eater size even more so .bullheads 12inches or more could be caught in mud bay by the reeds or even off the pier fishing the bottom at night. crappies were abundant walleye/ northern and Muskie also. largemouth and smallmouth not so much. those in the know could target the white bass and sunfish/rock bass/ bluegills were extremely abundant. weeds beds were present between virtually every dock.

1980s residents decided Bullheads were bad and destroyed the population. DNR was continuing to milk the native walleye population for there hatcheries and ice fishing and spearing were big time activities. Rusty crawfish population took off in the late 80s early 90s and weed beds took there first hits. leaches began to be a rare sight. perch schools seemed thinner than before no bullhead clouds to be seen. fishing in general seemed to start sliding down hill at this point emphasis seemed to change towards a bass and walleye /Muskie lake. Panfish were always taken for granted that they would be there in good numbers and exploited.

1990s more of the same downward slide except for panfish.  smallmouth and largemouth began to take off. weed beds still suffered leach's seemed to disappear. I believe it was this point that the DNR actually had to start stocking walleye because they decimated the native reproducing stock along with the native reproducing Muskie population but I could be wrong id have to check again.

2000s seemed to have promise with the fish cribs and panfish stockings. smallmouth and largemouth were doing well and crappies also but Muskie/pike walleye and jumbo perch all seemed thinner in population .weed beds continued to shrink and I believe this was when the Chinese mystery snails started showing up in numbers.in hind sight the panfish stockings probably should have been a warning the lake was suffering an imbalance. fish cribs now seem to be an attempt to make up for lost natural habit but unfortunately just concentrate the fish and are to easy to mark with depth finders and GPS leading to mass declines .a lake this large should never have a panfish population problem unless its over exploited or imbalanced.

2010 to 2020 has just seen this downward slide continue but now seems to be all species in the lake. Young of the year perch schools are small to say the least and I'm surprised when I see them. some weeds seem to be coming back between the docks but you cannot catch a dinner off your dock unless you luck out. I see no where's near the amount of fisherman on the lake as compared to the past decades but now we have the addition of mosquito treatments along the lake which if they contain pyrethroids will/are leaching into the lake and are damaging to aquatic ecosystems. home owners should read up on this its an easy thing to research on the internet. this could very well be the next thing that severely impacts this lake so many of us love. catch and release minimize your impacts take only what you reasonably need and maybe this lake regains some of its former glory. 


DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 12 POSTS
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