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Things that people think are true, but maybe aren't....

7/13/20 @ 8:12 PM
ORIGNAL POST
n.pike
n.pike
User since 4/2/02

I'll start. When a person catches a 12 inch bass with a gash in it, I often hear, "WHOA! Something really big must have tried to eat that thing..." and they look as if they are holding a fish that just went through something pretty traumatic and that there is a HUGE fish probably in the same waters. 


Ok, maybe it's true. But......it's also possible that it's a sore, or a scratch mark, a scar from a long time ago, or something else....

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 41 POSTS
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TODAY @ 3:27 PM
crawdaddy
User since 7/11/01

James...that was especially true when I have fished in Colorado.  Sometimes the walk down the steep hill/ canyon took an hour and 1 1/2 hours to climb out.  But, that made the adventure way more fun too.

TODAY @ 2:04 PM
JamesD
JamesD
MEMBER since 2/16/04

I think many, who have never fished or fish very little, think of fishing as a very sedentary sport for folks with little ambition and they tend to do more beer drinking than fishing. The last part may be true, but wading streams, rigging up and deploying lines after launching a boat, or casting off a pier for hours are, to me, the polar opposite of sedentary. Fishing can be easy, but most of the time it's lots of work and concentration.

TODAY @ 1:27 PM
crawdaddy
User since 7/11/01

Channel catfish are bottom feeders... nope

TODAY @ 1:05 PM
crawdaddy
User since 7/11/01

I'll agree with that one Elliott.  Suckers are pretty darn good. They just have a lot of bones in them.  Maybe that is why I pickle them and my friend cans them.  Another buddy makes fish patties out of them.  

TODAY @ 10:14 AM
nemab-man
User since 7/5/11

"you can still live a long and fulfilling live if you skip fishing and hide from the corona in your basement"

not true.

TODAY @ 8:56 AM
Phat Walleyes
Phat Walleyes
User since 3/31/15

Don't think it matters how much time you spend on the water when you have no idea what you're really talking about and haven't learned much...

8/6/20 @ 5:27 PM
nemab-man
User since 7/5/11

I think the difference between recreational and professional is that the recreational is looking for entertainment or maybe a fish fry while the pro is out to make money, in which case it is a job and the exact opposite of recreation. 

8/6/20 @ 10:38 AM
BigMusky12
BigMusky12
User since 12/22/04

The only difference between a good recreational fishermen and pro is time on the water.....oh wait, that is true.    

8/6/20 @ 10:38 AM
nemab-man
User since 7/5/11

I caught a 29" northern pike today on the first cast. It only takes one cast to catch a fish. Just got to cast in the right place at the right time.

I see what you mean though. I think it took me about five seasons casting crawler harnesses before I learned to discern from feel what that lure was doing, when it is weeds, when it is a fish, and the difference between a pike gulping it or perch pecking at it. But now crawler harness are what I use most. I never did get the hang of casting jigs. 

8/6/20 @ 1:51 AM
Phat Walleyes
Phat Walleyes
User since 3/31/15

When I was growing up most fish were of 10,000 casts... Bass, trout, walleye, salmon, pike, musky... 

I caught only panfish, perch, and bullheads... Once without a pole, I used the elastic thread out of my sock and a safety pin and caught a baby smallmouth off a reed bed along the shore... Maybe 6-8 inches and was the biggest fish of the day...

But I did that everywhere I went, especially if the water was known for trout or bass or whatever... My PB was a chunky bullhead... My first LM bass was when I was 16 or 17... Same with a rockbass, muskie, crappie... 

I guess I was fishing more, longer, more places and different structure, and times, fishing with better equipment, and a bigger selection of baits, fishing on my own, exploring...

So maybe my bigger fish were of 10,000 casts... Think my very first steelhead when I was 24... 

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 41 POSTS
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