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plant a tree

5/30/14 @ 11:13 AM
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4 reel
4 reel
User since 12/9/10
some interesting facts

DISPLAYING 1 TO 10 OF 32 POSTS
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6/25/14 @ 1:00 PM
ttreebark
ttreebark
User since 7/6/06
This is a big reason why you don't procrastinate with dying trees http://www.weather.com/video/freak-accident-kills-two-sisters-50353?

6/20/14 @ 1:34 AM
Lectrotech
Lectrotech
User since 11/19/09
CDS. My line of work is quite different, I tell people what needs to be done, then I tell them, "Don't make me come back and say I told you so". That has a tendency to make them pro-active.

6/19/14 @ 3:45 AM
Twister
User since 6/15/01
If so-called pros cannot tell one tree species from another I do not want them touching anything of mine.

Finally took out a huge cottonwood hanging over the house last fall. Hated to do it but I am sure I would have been in the same situation CDS described over the winter months with all the heavy snow we had.

Stick to your principles CDS. If you were closer I would have hired you myself.

6/18/14 @ 3:17 PM
fishfish
User since 3/4/11
Just remember, the right tree in the right place.

CD's- I am also in the "green industry". I knew enough when I bought a different house last year with mature trees to hire a professional tree service. I knew what needed to be pruned and what needed to removed. But I still listened to the arborist and let the pros do the work.

6/17/14 @ 11:42 PM
river_chaser
User since 10/3/12
Just bought a Iron County cottage last October and using all my spare time doing upgrades and improvements. The neighbors say the previous owner was a tree hugger and I must say it shows. Ive got 20+ trees leaning over the house and garage. Most trees are 12-20 inch diamerter. Couple birch are even bigger, one is over 3 ft dia. and these birch show their age with rotting branches. I do love the birch but I am thinking these beauties gotta go. Not looking forward to making this decision. But I hate to end up in a situation that CDS describes.

A good 40% of the trees are basswood. Basswood is one of those trees that are really nice when theyre few in number. But these bass are like 40 ft tall weeds. Theyve got so little practical value as firewood or lumber material. I would rather have most any other native tree than basswood.

6/13/14 @ 10:20 AM
'da Coach
'da Coach
User since 12/23/08
"Who's number is that? Who counted and what did they count?"

Don't know, I'd assumed the reporter got the number from the village, but it could be a SWAG, for all I know.

My bro-in-law lives near there, so I may be headed up that way within the next week or two, I'll try to take a look if I find myself over there.

Either way, finding the balance point between the interests of the community vs those of a property owner is an interesting challenge, to say the least. As I said, assuming no village ordinances are being violated, I'd vote in favor of the property owner.

6/12/14 @ 8:57 AM
'da Coach
'da Coach
User since 12/23/08
...two recurring resident concerns with the (Lake Forest Whole Foods development) project — the cutting down of up to 400 trees on the property...dominated public comment.

"Gail Hodges, president of the Lake Forest Preservation Foundation, said the 400-tree removal would be the largest in the city’s history.

“Clear-cutting and replanting an 8.5-acre site and waiting 100 or more years for replacement trees to grow does not meet the requirements of the city’s tree ordinance,” she said..."

If the proposal gets council’s stamp of approval, it would then need to be given the go-ahead from the Lake Forest Building Review Board and Historic Preservation Commission, which would vote on the razing of a historic 1930 “country house” mansion on the property.

“This has a long way to go further,” Plan Commission Chairman Michael Ley said.

"Known as the David C. Everitt Estate, the Tudor revival home — which includes a coach house and a shed — was named an historic landmark by Lake Forest in 2003. It is currently used as office space.

"...more painful is the prospect of the tree removal, which is a sore subject for many Lake Forest residents.

"In 1987, the actor known as Mr. T cut down more than 100 oak trees on his property in a move that caused quite an uproar at the time for residents of the city that touts itself as a “Tree City USA.” Lake Forest has earned the distinction, given out by the Arbor Day Foundation, for 33 years in a row.

That Mr. T incident, which residents are cautioning city officials against repeating on a larger scale, led Lake Forest to put more stringent rules in place for tree preservation.

While Shiner Group said it plans to replant about 300 trees in areas around the property, some residents maintained that wasn’t enough of a concession."

So... An interesting situation, to be sure. Both positions have a high degree of validity, IMO; I can see why Lake Forest residents feel invested in the community's tree tradition, OTOH, I can also appreciate the right of property owners to manage their property as they see fit, as long as what they're doing doesn't violate village ordinances.

As a sitting member of a local city council, I would encourage the property owner to consider any and all alternatives to clear-cutting the site. (Lake Forest Tree Preservation "rules" are quite specific with respect to what constitutes "Tree Preservation"); if it can be demonstrated that Whole Foods plans violates those guidelines, the Village can and should clearly communicate which portions of the property owners tree removal plan are subject to modification. Once the property owner's plan meets the village's requirements, I would vote in favor of the property owner moving forward with their plans.

What say youse?

6/5/14 @ 12:17 PM
Dave (Golden)
Dave (Golden)
MEMBER since 6/22/01
Perfect... !! Thank You.

6/5/14 @ 12:10 PM
fishfish
User since 3/4/11
Dave, No need to do anything to the pruning cuts. Spraying a pruning paint used to be the standard. Studies have shown it actually slows the healing process. I have been in the nursery/landscape industry for over 40 years. Jeff

6/5/14 @ 11:17 AM
qdmaguy
User since 6/14/10
I've planted hundreds of trees every year for the last 20+. I also cut and hingecut a great number of trees each year. They're a re-newable resource. Some trees have little value for a deer manager, others have significant value.

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