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Old boat gas

3/17/18 @ 4:25 PM
ORIGNAL POST
One shot one kill
MEMBER since 8/12/02

I have some old boat gas mix . A guy at work gave me an extra tank with some in it  . A gallon or so . I thought to put it in old metal paint cans in my fire ring , start a fire  , and back off . It's 15 (?)  Years old so not as volatile as new gas . It should just burn off fast ?  My soil is pure sand so I don't want to dump it then drop a match . 

Any thoughts ?

DISPLAYING 1 TO 5 OF 5 POSTS
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3/17/18 @ 5:06 PM
One shot one kill
MEMBER since 8/12/02

I don't want to dump it since the soil is sand and pollute my well water . I figure if it is in open cans in steel fire ring and I light a fire in ring there should be time to safely move before if ignites .

3/17/18 @ 4:46 PM
river_chaser
User since 10/3/12

Gas will burn black. And a galn of gas will spread fumes in wide area. Try to put keep in the the small metal can and put the can in a 55 gallon burner barrel just for a precaution.

another option is dump it on a large pile of gravel or sand and burn it

3/17/18 @ 4:42 PM
pool 9 cathunter
User since 9/23/14

https://www.mmsd.com/what-you-can-do/home-haz-mat-collection


If you're in the Milwaukee area

3/17/18 @ 4:40 PM
BugleTrout
BugleTrout
User since 9/27/01

15 years old?  I'd use it for fire starter.  It shouldn't be very volatile at this point.  I'd still treat it as it is though.  Especially the first time you use it.  Stay upwind and as far back as you can throw a match.  If it's dead calm out, don't pour it on and let it sit for a period of time before lighting it.  If there are still volatiles, they are heavier than air and can creep out of the pit and spread to where you are standing.  But at 15 years old, it should be about the equivalent of kerosene at this point.

I used to work in the petroleum and environmental industry and tested gasoline and soil & water contaminated with gasoline.  If not treated, gas ages at a fairly fast rate and loses it volatiles leaving the semi-volatiles which are similar in chemical structure to kerosine.  Gasoline's higher carbon-containing compounds have 9-11 carbon molecules and kerosine's compounds have 12-15.  Thus ends today's science lesson.

But always use caution when working with anything flammable.



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