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New Prop style coming

10/14/19 @ 7:59 AM
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nihsif
nihsif
MEMBER since 6/15/01

Sharrow Engineering Propeller ... interesting

https://www.boattest.com/review/sharrow-engineering/3986

note: if you don't want to be a member to watch the video, there is plenty of information below the video box to read

EDIT: to be a member is free, and only requires your email... I signed up a few years ago... I do get DAILY EMAILS from them, but I do not find that to be an issue, as I like seeing some of the new boats, even if MOST are more yachts than fishing boats, but they do review fishing boats and pontoons

 

 

DISPLAYING 1 TO 9 OF 9 POSTS
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10/15/19 @ 6:13 PM
amaranthlost
User since 5/31/10

Steels are the most common but alloys like Inconel, etc  are possible. Boeing is even looking at, or might have started, using 3D printed titanium parts for some applications instead of forged since they machine away up to 80% of the forging. Aluminum is possible but as far as I know they don't have the material properties down yet for some aerospace applications. There are several methods for 3D printing metals depending on part geometry and intended use but a lot require some finishing machining or post processing. The LEAP engines on the Boeing 737MAX and A320NEO series have a lot of 3D printed parts, including fuel nozzles. It's a pretty fascinating field and growing fast. 


10/15/19 @ 5:48 PM
12packabs
12packabs
User since 12/19/06

Are you guys saying that there is a 3D printer that can print in aluminum?  Or any metal?  I was under the impression that all 3D printers still melted various plastics to make "models" and "prototypes", later finished goods still being cast or machined....

Thanks for the info fishin!

10/15/19 @ 10:55 AM
amaranthlost
User since 5/31/10

DMG Mori has a 3D-5th axis hybrid machining center but it's still relatively new and fairly pricey. 

We do a lot of 3D printing and it's getting more and more popular in aerospace for a lot of applications due to the complex part geometries you can get in a single piece  vs the multiple part assemblies required when using conventional machined components.

10/15/19 @ 9:56 AM
nihsif
nihsif
MEMBER since 6/15/01

I agree, on phone that login stuff was blocking a lot of content... very annoying... I signed up a few years ago, it's free and only requires email for login... that's just an FYI

some stuff on manufacturing, which matches your thoughts

"Advanced additive manufacturing technologies played a large role in Sharrow Engineering’s development process, particularly for model scale validation testing because, and the design-test cycle was accelerated considerably. Currently, casting patterns come from 3D printed waxes, but 3D printing is still not at the stage where it scales to production volumes. The ability to manufacture very precise high-quality propellers is essential to Sharrow Engineering’s testing and manufacturing programs. "

"Traditional investment casting is used for both protypes and production versions of the Sharrow Propeller™. Depending on the application and market volume, Sharrow uses the manufacturing process that makes the right propeller for the right application at best value to the customer. "

--- some captions from the pics of the mfg processes ---

"The MX-1 being made with a 5-axis router from a solid billet of aluminum alloy. "

"CAD-CAM manufucturing with 5-axis routers gives Sharrow Engineering the ability to quickly make one-off prototypes for testing. Hundreds have been made of all different sizes for many different applications during the Sharrow Propeller™’s 7+ year development period, says the company. "

"Production versions can be machined using 5-axis routers if that is the most economical process for the application. "

I found this all interesting as my Data Processing/IT career was with 2 engineering/manufacturing companies

10/14/19 @ 7:41 PM
kyl_me
User since 7/21/08

Did not read the article, the sign up box annoyed me. Just a guess, but thinking it is not machined. Looks like something made by 3D printing (additive manufacturing). 

10/14/19 @ 3:30 PM
12packabs
12packabs
User since 12/19/06

I'd bet that the smaller the propeller (on smaller engines) reduces the efficiencies and differences over the traditional design...just like a SS prop makes little difference on 50hp vs. a noticeable difference on a 200hp engine.

Cool propeller for sure.  Wonder about the machining costs?  It would take a mill a long time to machine out that from billet metal..maybe it's an initial casting, but I highly doubt it.  Complicated programming for sure (on the mill).

I would think the first application would be submarines for the military, followed by massive military and cargo ships.  Could you imagine the machining needed to make a 24' diameter prop?

I can't imagine how crappy I'd feel hitting a rock with that baby.  I almost cried when I wrecked a cheap aluminum prop this past summer...we will have to stay tuned.

10/14/19 @ 12:25 PM
nihsif
nihsif
MEMBER since 6/15/01

good question,  they'd be competing against SS props, so it's already an upscale market... even given that,  it's probably a tough market to get into ...

10/14/19 @ 8:53 AM
Herb2
User since 12/28/18

Very interesting results, can they make it affordable?

DISPLAYING 1 TO 9 OF 9 POSTS
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