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Where did all my deer go?

11/23/14 @ 10:01 PM
ORIGNAL POST
Gosling Bowman
Gosling Bowman
User since 6/22/07
Hello fellow hunters! I am hoping somebody here has some knowledge on what happens to my land during winter. From spring to fall there's plenty of deer bedding on my land. Mostly does until the rut rolls around. it always seems the first snowfall that covers the ground the deer disappear. There's not much hunting pressure around as I'm the only bow hunter near by and only one neighbor gun hunts. There's is usually corn surrounding the property and the deer stick around even when the corn is cut. Half the property is very thick (where the deer bed) and then the rest is a big ridge. Just about any day bowhunting I'll see from 5-15 deer but after the first snow I'm lucky to see one each sit. During the rut we have plenty of pictures of mature bucks on cam every day.This opening weekend I seen 1 buck and I decided to take him. Also, only does bed on the land up until the rut. What can I do to get more deer around year round, and is there anything I can do to bring bucks in before the rut. I am hunting is western wisconsin if that helps Thanks for any help! Gosling Bowman

DISPLAYING 1 TO 8 OF 8 POSTS
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11/27/14 @ 5:38 AM
Gosling Bowman
Gosling Bowman
User since 6/22/07
That's something I'll have to consider with the pasture! One corn field was cut about the 2nd week of October and the other was cut this past saturday. I believe the corn that was harvested early on in the year is about half winter wheat right now.

11/26/14 @ 9:48 AM
GreatOutdoors2001
User since 7/5/01
Take 10 acres of the 20 acre pasture and plant a mix of spruce, white cedar, hemlock, and maybe some white pines. Take the other 10 acres and split it between standing corn and brassicas. You'll never ask the question again of where your deer went. Deer need thermal cover and food in the winter. Sounds like them leaving is snow/winter anticipation related rather than pressure. You must be lacking one of the 2, maybe both.

How are the 100 acre corn fields harvested by you? Are they cut early for sileage? Are they still standing now? Are they harvested later for grain? Does the farmer chisel plow or otherwise work the field after harvest? These factors will determine how viable of a food source they are this time of year.

11/26/14 @ 8:02 AM
oldhunter
User since 2/28/13
You had mentioned a big ridge on the property. When the snow and colder weather move in on higher more open woods, the deer tend to pull out because they are looking for better winter shelter.

11/26/14 @ 1:17 AM
Gosling Bowman
Gosling Bowman
User since 6/22/07
We have 60 acres, 40 is wooded and the other is a pasture. There's a very small creek that hold water year round but when we are in somewhat of a drought the water only holds near the road not the middle of the pasture. We've only taken one doe off the land in the past 7 years. Maybe the does are dominating the bedding area? Also, we don't have a food source on the property but 2 sides have 100 acre corn fields

11/25/14 @ 8:41 PM
qdmaguy
User since 6/14/10
As asked before...how many acres? Oftentimes, doe groups will dominate bedding areas. Bucks don't want to bed "right on top" of doe/fawn groups and prefer some solitude. Doe/fawn groups prefer to bed close to food sources when there is good/safe bedding nearby. Do you have any food sources on your property?

11/25/14 @ 8:34 PM
ihookem
ihookem
User since 11/29/01
Our family has 53 ac in Shawano Co. when the snow gets just a few inches they head for the swamps a mi. away. I don't know why. We have 1/2 mi . of river forntage so water is not the problem. In Price co. the snow has to be 2' deep before they will yard up. I thing maybe Shawano co. land suffers from wind breaks. There is not enough thermal protection there.

11/25/14 @ 8:20 PM
bassmaster+recordracks
bassmaster+recordracks
User since 2/25/12
Water is key. What do you have for water? Is it dry later in the year?

DISPLAYING 1 TO 8 OF 8 POSTS
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