Question about parking on bridges on state highways & roads

11/11/15 @ 8:34 PM
ORIGINAL POST
Lex
Lex
USER since 6/21/11
I love to explore the road less traveled. Unpaved roads and thick forests just appeal to me, and I love being out alone with nature whenever I can. Lately, I've been discovering rivers and creeks that don't get much traffic and would like to continue. Anyway, I have a question about the small bridges you often see over rivers and streams (see attached photo). Is it legal to park my vehicle next to the bridge and walk down to the river to put my kayak in and/or wade fishing? That's a county road/ highway usually around 40-50 mph. If it's legal, there are hundreds of them I'd like to explore. Any advice would be appreciated. (red lines = where i would park) (blue dots = where the river runs)
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 24 Posts
11/25/15 @ 11:51 AM
luvh20
luvh20
USER since 1/19/14
I don't know who is right or wrong. But, as I've said before, if you can't spell you look a bit less knowledgeable to me (and others). Hence, your credibility is down a notch.

So their! Tounge Out

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11/19/15 @ 12:30 PM
mvanhank222
mvanhank222
USER since 12/16/13
http://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/statutes/82.pdf

the easiest place to look for right of way widths would be the county GIS site. read 82.31 it discusses the creation of township roads and the assumptions made by the statute. I would caution local parking ordinances may vary from place to place and time to time.

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11/18/15 @ 5:27 PM
pike eyes
pike eyes
USER since 12/28/10
You can most definitely walk down the shoulder of the road! That does not include crossing over people's yards. There is a fine line. The shoulder is a rite of way. There lawns are not! !!!!.I have never seen where the shoulders meet the water. Therefore there's no access! Unless you ask for permission. You cannot gain access by going over there yard. Come on Really. If you own several properties you would also/ should also no this. Call your local sheriff's office see what they tell you. Maybe it's your comprehension skills you should be worrying about

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11/18/15 @ 4:16 PM
DLAMA2
DLAMA2
USER since 5/1/05
You need to read and comprehend because you are lost.

I excluded township roads because back in the day townships did not have very accurate surveying for roads. Most roads were put in the best locations. Never mentioned cities lots not sure why you are on that?

State, Federal and County roads all have right of ways. Which are legal to walk to the water unless no parking signs/laws are enforced.

Now you are just arguing to argue.

BTW I own multiple properties.

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11/18/15 @ 3:13 PM
pike eyes
pike eyes
USER since 12/28/10
"I owned half a township road when I lived in MI" Go figure you pay taxes to the centerline!!!!!! best thing to do is call the local municipality and they will explain to you that you cant be dragging boats/canoes or anything else over someone's lawn even though Dalama says you can. Heck just pull right off into his mowed lawn and park.

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11/18/15 @ 2:54 PM
pike eyes
pike eyes
USER since 12/28/10
Again you are only partially right. It is the right of way for the state/county. Not for the general public. That is what I said in my original post. Look back. I Called it an easement to work. Its not an easement for public access. You obviously don't own a home because you would see on your deed exactly to where you pay taxes too. I don't care how long you have built bridges, just goes to show you can always learn.

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11/18/15 @ 2:38 PM
DLAMA2
DLAMA2
USER since 5/1/05
We are not talking city lot lines, that is a totally different animal. State, Federal and County hwy's have standard offsets from the centerline.

Just the minimum offset of 35ft with a 12ft lane, 3ft shoulder and a 3ft gravel shoulder would still leave you 17ft of State, Federal or county right of way before your land.

I am attaching a common bridge area over a river (thornapple) and you can see the right of way lines that I highlighted 3 at 75ft from centerline and one at 60ft from centerline. Anything between those lines is road right of way that the only enforcement is from state or county officials.

You "PK" nails are actually for station marks on the road, you can drive them through asphalt and last longer than spray paint, on concrete they usually stamp the fresh pour as they survey roads that need to be reconstructed well in advance. You "PK" nails are at 100ft intervals. They are there to mark the precise spot of a station mark not a lot line in the middle of a road.

BTW PK is just the name brand of the nail. I have been on 100's of these and bid on 1000's of them in the last 32 years and have not seen one yet where a property owners lot line end up on a corner of a bridge.

But yes carry on and call everyone else uneducated idiots, you're looking good.

Edit: here is just half the bridge as it will not let me attach anything scanned.

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11/18/15 @ 1:05 PM
pike eyes
pike eyes
USER since 12/28/10
Dlama your facts are close but not totally correct. If what you say is true for instance. In the cities you can do what ever you want in most peoples front yard. In some cases you can probably sit in there front porch. There are a lot of houses well inside either one of those measurements. pull the deed on your house If you own one See where you actually own to. It will surprise you. Why do you think the PK nails are always in the road? Your belief is the common belief but it is incorrect. There would be a lot of paths across a lot of nice yards to go fishing if what you say is true. Go and pick someone's flowers, garden, put a rut in that area that is within what you say the road owns and see what happens.

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11/17/15 @ 12:59 PM
DLAMA2
DLAMA2
USER since 5/1/05
Pike,

If they are not on your property they are not on your land. If the Feds, State or township owns it you have zero say in it.

The distance from state/county center line is either 35ft, 6xFT or 9xFt. Can't exactly remember the 60 or 90 foot distance. They do not angle towards a bridge. Now if the contractor needed more room to work on said bridge or the state need more room for a bypass yes they would ask for an easement to complete the work.

Just because I fence that the state puts up angles towards the bridge does not mean the lot lines go that route. That is done to keep people from that water or road from having unrestricted access to the main road on top or bottom.

I have worked on 100's of WISDOT bridges in my lifetime and not one had the lot line go right to the corner of a bridge. The offset was the distance posted above.

Township roads might have a twist to them because like I posted before people just wanted a road back in the day and survey's were not the most accurate. I owned half of a township road when I lived in Michigan.

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11/14/15 @ 11:15 AM
amaranthlost
amaranthlost
USER since 5/31/10
You (may) have the right to use the road verge, but you need to know where that ends if present. A road verge is different than an easement as it is usually public property. If you have questions as to what is legal, ask the local government. From past threads on this topic, all you'll get here is a lot of people arguing over what you can and can't do and the only definite answer to guarantee you won't be trespassing will come from the local government whether it be municipality, township, county, etc. You can also find the owner of the property where you want to fish and ask for permission. You may get even better access to the area that way.

All people here can do is state what they think they know or their experiences, hence my caveats. Getting property owner permission will also help to prevent any disputes. I'm protective of my property but I also allow for minor misconceptions of the law, withing reason.

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 24 Posts