water temps

7/2/14 @ 8:33 PM
ORIGINAL POST
Oxman
Oxman
USER since 5/4/08
Im new to musky fishing, and know as the water warms you can cause harm to the fish. But was is the magic number when to stop musky fishing till the water cools. Thanks in advance!
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Displaying 1 to 5 of 5 Posts
7/3/14 @ 8:39 AM
vegas492
vegas492
USER since 5/21/03
80 degrees is my "magic" water temp to quit fishing. Can you harm the fish in this hotter water? Absolutely. Delayed mortality is a very real thing. You catch it, release it quickly, it dives and you go on your merry way. Then the fish floats back up the surface and dies a little while later.

Here is what happens. Lactic acid builds up during a fight. No matter how quick the fight. If you pull this fish out of water that has oxygen, say 15 feet down and you release it in the top of the water column that is warm and has little oxygen, then it may not have the strength to dive and sustain a depth where there is oxygen.

I know many good sticks that keep fishing through warm water. And most of these guys fish under 10 feet of water where fish are more or less used to depleted oxygen. And they never remove a fish from the water, they water release anything.

Personally I'm still not a fan of this, but if you want to fish warm water, this is probably the best approach.

Fishing at night or very early in the morning doesn't really help things much. The real issue is a fish coming up from the thermocline to eat, then cannot dive and sustain that depth to get the oxygen it needs. That is an issue whether you night fish or day fish.

My advice, put the rods down for a week or two. Maybe fish bass or something else. Get your rigs ready for the late summer/early fall period and give 'em hell at that time.

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7/2/14 @ 11:00 PM
WiscoMuskys
WiscoMuskys
USER since 1/19/12
One other thing, if you do happen to snag a musky in temps higher than I mentioned, do your best to not horse the fish in or dont let it fish get worn out. And keep it in the net in the water as much as possible!

Dont forget a good set of hook cutters, for a quick and safe release!

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7/2/14 @ 10:51 PM
WiscoMuskys
WiscoMuskys
USER since 1/19/12
Everyone has their own opinion. I would say do not be fishing in 79 degrees or higher surface temps in a large and deep lakes.... In shallow lakes (max depth of 20feet or less), I would say 75 is the very top.

The one exception would be late at night/early morning when the surface temps can retreat under those degrees.

The key is understanding where the thermocline is. Thermocline= the different layers of water temps, and where they become stratified in the water column. This happens over time in the spring, and again in the fall. Depending on where you fish, these layers may already be occuring in your area.

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7/2/14 @ 10:50 PM
WiscoMuskys
WiscoMuskys
USER since 1/19/12
Everyone has their own opinion. I would say do not be fishing in 79 degrees or higher surface temps in a large and deep lakes.... In shallow lakes (max depth of 20feet or less), I would say 75 is the very top.

The one exception would be late at night/early morning when the surface temps can retreat under those degrees.

The key is understanding where the thermocline is. Thermocline= the different layers of water temps, and where they become stratified in the water column. This happens over time in the spring, and again in the fall. Depending on where you fish, these layers may already be occuring in your area.

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