Please, help us bring the Muskie back to Arizona.

1/15/16 @ 1:00 AM
ORIGINAL POST
Brandyn Shepherd
Brandyn Shepherd
USER since 1/14/16
Please visit http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/arizona-muskie-fishing for more information. If you do not wish to visit the petition page, I will post the content from the page below. Feel free to discuss the idea and possibility of bringing the Muskie back to Arizona. Thank you for your time. Pure Muskie (Muskellunge) or Tiger Muskie in Arizona... Are you all for bringing the Muskie back to Arizona? Which lake/s would you like to see stocked with pure Muskie or Tiger Muskie? Click here to join us on our Facebook Group The Tiger Muskie is a cross between a pure Muskie and a Northern Pike. We are promoting the idea and collecting signatures and comments from those who are interested in the possibility of a Muskie fishery existing in Arizona. Let's extend the Muskies range in North America! Muskie have been caught in over 35 states and in Canada and exist in over 1,000 different bodies of water. Tiger Muskie have been stocked in over 25 states including Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Muskie do well in lakes and rivers. In 1973, thirty thousand six hundred Muskellunge sac-fry were planted in Mormon Lake southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Shad were also stocked in the lake. The lake dried up and the Muskie anglers and the Muskies did not stand a chance. Let's give them another chance. Largemouth Bass were introduced to Arizona in 1897, Walleye were introduced in 1957, Northern Pike were introduced in 1965, and Flathead Catfish were introduced to Arizona in the 1940's. Some of the best Bass and Walleye fisheries in the country are also some of the best Muskie fisheries. Muskies and other species of game fish co-exist well together. Muskies were once hunted to the point of no return in some parts of the United States. Thanks to groups like Muskies Inc., fishing clubs, state agency's, and the general public - the state of the Muskie fishery is in great shape. Illinois once had a native population of Muskies. Due to pollution, overharvest, and destruction of natural habitat, the Muskie fishery had disappeared by the late 1960’s. Through private donations, the Chicagoland Muskie Hunters division of Muskies Inc. was able to purchase Muskie fingerlings and public lakes in Illinois were stocked in the 1970’s. Several different strains of Muskie fingerlings were purchased or trades were made. Numerous states including Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Tennessee, and Wisonsin helped provide Illinois with different strains of Muskie. Fish from all over eventually lead to a new strain of Muskie which is now referred to as the “Illinois Strain.” Muskie diet samples were collected between May 2007 and May 2012 in Mingo Lake, Otter Lake, Pierce Lake, Ridge Lake, Sam Dale Lake, Lake Shelbyville, and Lake of the Woods located in Illinois. There was no consistent pattern of predation on Largemouth Bass or other game fish species. Shad were the primary forage of Muskies when present. Largemouth Bass populations were analyzed after Muskie introductions in Johnson Lake, Wheel Lake, and Shovel Lake - also located in Illinois. Data and catch records from anglers show that Largemouth Bass populations and overall average size increased after Muskies were introduced. The Muskie is a very important game fish in Wisconsin and throughout North America. 1,092 Muskie in 34 bodies of water located in Wisconsin were studied from July 1991 to October 1994. Only 34.3% of the total Muskie had food in their stomach. 74% of the Muskie had one single prey item in their stomach. Fish made up 98% of the Muskies diet. Walleye ranked low in the Muskies diet while Yellow Perch were the primary forage. The Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit believes Muskies would be a better suited alternative to Northern Pike in Arizona waters. The two can co-exist together. Colorado Parks and Wildlife have talked about stocking Tiger Muskies in the Colorado River to help manage the Northern Pike population to protect native species of fish. New Mexico has stocked Tiger Muskies and it improved an existing Trout fishery according to resident anglers. Flathead Catfish are known as apex predators in many bodies of water throughout the U.S. Indeed, Arizona supports several healthy Flathead Catfish populations in its lakes. In fact, some of those same lakes also support healthy populations of game fish such as Largemouth Bass and Smallmouth Bass. Many small (less than 100 acres) and large lakes around the lower 48 contain Muskies as well as excellent populations of Bluegill, Crappie, Bass, and Walleye. In a popular aquarium, Muskies have gone up to six months without eating. Muskie are more selective in their feeding habits, generally eat less than Flathead Catfish, and usually exist in much lower numbers. Furthermore, predatory fishes such as Muskies have the potential to increase the size and quality of certain fish populations of species such as Largemouth Bass. Muskie can grow to be a big, powerful fish that will hit a wide variety of fishing lures and live bait. They will follow lures, hit lures at the side of the boat or at your feet, make impressive jumps, and make powerful runs. Muskie prefer to eat Minnows, Suckers, and Shad. Muskie can be caught on specialized Muskie fishing tackle, heavy Bass gear, and fly fishing equipment both casting or trolling - day and night. Cast bucktails, troll crankbaits, jig Bondy baits, or float your favorite fly. Some like to compare Muskie fishing to Deer hunting due to increased activity around low-light conditions, moon phases, and weather changes. The Muskie is renowned as a sport fish, because it can reach sizes over 50 inches long & over 40 pounds. Muskie fishing presents a unique oportunity for anglers of all ages. Muskie prefer water temperatures around 75 degrees and can tolerate water temperatures in the 89-93 degree range (Scott and Crossman 1973; Hassan and Spotila 1976; Reynolds and Casterlin 1979, Jobling 1981). Northern Pike prefer water temperatures around 68 degrees. Northern Pike can tolerate water temperatures over 86 degrees (Ridenhour 1957). Striped Bass prefer water temperatures in the 45-68 degree range. Striped Bass will be under stress when water temperatures exceed 77 degrees (Moyle 2002). Water temperatures exceeding 86 degrees can be lethal for Striped Bass. Walleye prefer water temperatures in the 68-75 degree range (Dendy 1948; Ferguson 1958; Kelso 1972; Huh et al. 1976). Water temperatures in the 86-95 degree range can be lethal for Walleye (Koenst and Smith 1976; Momot et al. 1977). Northern Pike, Striped Bass, and Walleye do well in several lakes in Arizona. Please sign our petition and leave a comment along with where you are from. Tell us what Muskie fishing means to you. Let's discuss the possibility of bringing the Muskie back to Arizona's amazing fishery! Thank you. Your time is appreciated. Arizona Muskie Fishing Lake Prospects Lake Pleasant Surface Area 7500 acres Average Depth 70 ft Max. Depth 479 ft According to the Lake Pleasant Regional Park website, Lake Pleasant is home to White Bass, Striped Bass, Largemouth Bass, Bluegill, White Crappie, Black Crappie, Bigmouth Buffalo Fish, Channel Catfish, Flathead Catfish, Green Sunfish, Redear Sunfish, and Tilapia. Shad are also in Lake Pleasant. Navionics Topography Map: https://webapp.navionics.com/#@9&key=sn~mEzn_lT Ashurst Lake Surface Area: 229 acres Average Depth: 12 ft Fish species in Ashurst Lake include Rainbow Trout, Channel Catfish, and Northern Pike. Navionics Topography Map: https://webapp.navionics.com/#@12&key=kovtEnv|fT Check out these cool links... The Arizona Game and Fish has stocked Muskellunge In Mormon Lake waterandwoods.net/2008/10/musky-range-expanded-with-the-hybrid-tiger-musky Muskies Inc. - Muskie Fishing Conservation muskiesinc.org Search YouTube for Muskie fishing videos youtube.com/results?search_query=muskie+fishing Check out The Musky Hunter TV show youtube.com/user/MuskyHunterTV/videos Check out Keyes Outdoors TV show youtube.com/user/keyesoutdoors/videos Musky Fishing Video youtube.com/watch?v=TnS1GLdPmJI Check out Muskie fishing tackle muskyshop.com Learn about and discuss Muskie fishing muskiefirst.com Arizona Game and Fish Department azgfdportal.az.gov A Muskies Diet files.dnr.state.mn.us/fish_wildlife/fisheries/species/muskie/MUE_Diet.pdf Muskie Impact and Diet on Lake Vermilion lakevermilion.com/muskies/htmls/diets.html Brochure on the Behavior and Diet of Muskies newmexicomuskiesinc.org/resources/muskiefeeding_brochure$5B1$5D.pdf Project Green Gene Muskie Study - Investigating the performance of different genetic strains of Muskies illinimuskiesalliance.org/projectGreenGene.asp Arizona Muskie Fishing Facebook Page facebook.com/groups/arizonamuskiefishing
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Displaying 1 to 7 of 7 Posts
5/5/16 @ 3:16 AM
Brandyn Shepherd
Brandyn Shepherd
USER since 1/14/16

Scott, the gamefish in these lakes are non native. Adding Muskies would be adding to the existing list on introduced species to the state. It almost seems like we have everything except Salmon and Muskies :)

Largemouth Bass can survive the warm water temperatures where the native fish species live. They along with Rainbow Trout pose a threat to these native fish populations - which consists mainly of minnows. Rainbow Trout can not survive the warm water temperatures in most of these waters. Neither can Muskies.

Largemouth Bass are accepted and Rainbow Trout are stocked heavily every year. Florida Strain Largemouth Bass are actually being stocked. These fish are not native to Arizona and would probably do more damage than a Muskie if all species were put in a similar situation.

Not to mention the damage introducing Florida Strain Largemouth Bass could do to the existing Largemouth Bass populations.

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3/2/16 @ 2:12 AM
svitreum
svitreum
USER since 8/29/06
Scott F I couldn't agree with you more. It seems like everybody wants Muskies every-freakin-where. Man is never satisfied. I will never understand this.

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2/20/16 @ 2:30 PM
Scott F
Scott F
USER since 6/12/10
I'm sorry, I think it's wrong to introduce species into environments they are not native to. It upsets the ecological balance.

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2/20/16 @ 9:38 AM
Carp King
Carp King
USER since 8/7/01
Better find a lake that won't dry up to put them into.

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2/2/16 @ 8:47 PM
Todd Young
Todd Young
USER since 6/25/15
Signed the petition online the other day. Love to see anglers from all over have the chance to experience of tangleing with a musky. Good luck Arizona. Hope you get them back in the mix.

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1/15/16 @ 12:36 PM
BigMusky12
BigMusky12
MEMBER since 12/22/04
just have the Packers bring some this weekend

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