Muskys a protected species

6/10/15 @ 2:38 PM
ORIGINAL POST
drptine
drptine
USER since 6/6/07
I read a lot of enjoyable reports on people that have caught muskies only to have someone in a later post tell he or she either handle the fish wrong,layed the fish on the carpet,took the fish out of the water,fought the fish to long,used the wrong kind of net,and so on. If this resource is so precious why not ban fishing for them.
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 15 Posts
1/20/16 @ 10:08 PM
Adam@HonestMusky
Adam@HonestMusky
USER since 1/20/16
I do not think badgering and insulting people is appropriate. However, i do see many instances were fish should be handled much better, both in real life and on youtube. We don't have to be all or nothing in this matter. I believe in fish and let fish, but there is too much pressure on our aquatic resources not to take the best possible care of them. I agree that if one does not want to hurt fish, then that individual should not go fishing. However, it is tough to watch others either wantonly or ignorantly abusing resources so many others care so deeply about. It's a tough call and a tough situation. I think polite education in forums like this, in media, and in the field is the best route. People may become offended and/or angry, but that is life. I have seen too many muskies flopping in the bottom of the boat or on rocks. I have seen too many hooks dug out of deeply hooked fished. If anyone wants to talk about proper fish handling, I am not perfect but I bet I can offer good insight.

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6/21/15 @ 6:09 PM
burroak
burroak
USER since 6/26/01
Three years ago I was bass fishing in an Oneida County lake with a spinning rod and 6# test casting a small X-Rap. A 42" musky hit and I fought it a long time before I finally got it to the edge of the boat (perhaps I should have broken the fish off). I worked to revive it for a long time and it finally swam away only to go belly up. I was in shallow water so I could not maneuver the boat close to the fish. I jumped out of the boat, beached the boat and worked on the fish for another five or six minutes. she tried to kick feebly away a few times but I kept working on her until I was satisfied that the fish was all right. I went back to the same lake the next day and no sign of the fish so I felt pretty good about what I did. Last year on the same lake I had a musky about 44" go after a smallmouth which I swung out of the water. Same Fish? Don't know, but that made me hope that I succeeded and I felt pretty good.

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6/12/15 @ 9:07 AM
Ulbian
Ulbian
USER since 9/24/03
Excellent post Denesox...especially the financial side of it.

30 or so years ago the muskie fishing opportunities in WI were not what they are now. It has improved dramatically largely due to the catch and release ethic that has become entrenched. It's becoming more common for stocking to be used to maintain a fishery as opposed to building one.

I'm affiliated with a club that did a considerable amount of stocking to build a muskie fishery which has become very good. A comfortable population density was reached a few years back so stocking efforts have been slowed way down and we are in maintenance mode. Where to go with money that would've been used to buy extended growth fingerling muskies? Donations to local chapters of Walleyes for Tomorrow, local lake associations, repair of boat launches making them handicapped accessible, scholarship programs, sponsorship of little league teams, etc. If people were not handling these fish in a way that gave them the best shot at survival more funds would've been needed to continue building and maintaining things instead of going to other organizations. Money for little league uniforms or handicap accessible docks that would've had to come from elsewhere.

A few years back I had some guys out on a northern WI lake and they caught a beautiful tiger that was quite large. That fish didn't have a mark on it at all. It was worthy of a pic so we took one and after a few days one of them notices a very, very distinct marking on it's cheek. I shared a pic of that fish with two guys I know who at one time were guiding on that body of water to see if they had seen that fish. Within 48 hours there were 7 other photos of that fish being caught by 7 different anglers sitting in my email inbox. Pretty cool knowing that people handled that fish the way they did giving others an opportunity at a memorable experience. All accounts of that fish being caught in the past were that it was unhooked in the net and pulled out for a quick horizontal pic and let go. Never touched boat carpet, never was held vertically, etc. At least 8 documented releases (including the one from my boat) and that specimen was as clean as can be.

I agree that some people need to get a thicker skin while at the same time some folks come across way too strong in their pontificating.

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6/12/15 @ 8:22 AM
Robbollio
Robbollio
USER since 10/17/04
A simple sticky ruler on the side of the boat solves many issues. Wether its musky or gills. Unhook without the fish ever touching anything but your hands, eyeball the length, right back in. Can be done alone easily. I think a lot of the time you see a musky or other fish sitting on the bottom of a boat is because the person is alone and wants a picture of the fish. That simple. Its rare, and the fish is released at least. It is what it is and the intent is to not kill the fish, so I can live with it.

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6/12/15 @ 6:36 AM
SnakeSter
SnakeSter
MEMBER since 7/9/12
Yes Denesox, I truly believe most of the fishermen on this site do their best to take care of a hooked fish. I think what some of us get upset about are the people who think you shouldn't keep any of the fish you catch. They believe their way or the highway. I respect the thoughts of fishermen doing their thing differently than myself, but at the same time, fishermen like myself deserve respect. I follow all laws and regulations. They are there for a reason. We all get along, but sometimes disagreements get the best of us. Everyone is responsible for dead fish. Just some more than others. I respect guys who want to teach proper handling technics as long as they know what they are talking about. Experience is the key. Even with experience, there is still a small mortality rate which was my point. Everyone has killed a fish or two, or three, or more. No way to know.

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6/11/15 @ 7:46 PM
1cast-away
1cast-away
USER since 2/2/09
It's no different than any other fish.....if I catch a walleye or bass that is undersized (catch and release). I'm going to put that fish back in the best condition possible...not drop it in the bottom of the boat to pummel itself silly for 5 min while I dig out my pliers and ruler and to see if it maybe a keeper.

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6/11/15 @ 6:50 PM
denesox
denesox
USER since 2/1/06
They are a low density fish that deals with stress and poor handling worse than most other gamefish. Stocking them is very expensive and its driven by dedicated people that love them. Because of all this, its important that as many of these fish that are released survive the ordeal. The estimated replacement value to a lake of a legal musky is astronomical compared to other fish, making unwanted deaths costly not only for the anglers enjoying the lake, but for the taxpayers and organizations supporting their stocking.

Let me just ask a basic question....if you aren't holding/handling a fish properly....or really doing anything improperly in life, why would you get upset because someone wants to help you do it better or correctly? Why would someone not welcome good information?

I don't get the fuzz, some people just need thicker skin and not be offended by every little thing...especially those attempting to better your methods.

Education should be welcomed with open arms, not shunned and ridiculed. Too many people get offended when in reality they SHOULD be thankful.

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6/11/15 @ 6:49 PM
SnakeSter
SnakeSter
MEMBER since 7/9/12
I don't understand! If you're catch and release, the mortality rate is a little less for the fish, but the mortality rate is still there!!!! If you cared so much, you wouldn't risk the life of the fish for your selfish pleasures!! That's about as simple as it can be said!

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6/11/15 @ 4:28 PM
1cast-away
1cast-away
USER since 2/2/09
Honestly, I think the TV musky guys are sometimes worse than anybody and they know better. They take a million pics for advertisements and make sure they have a bunch of good hero shots, with their own bait strategically placed in the fishes mouth. I guess if your plan is to catch and release any kind of fish...care should be taken to ensure a good release.

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6/11/15 @ 4:22 PM
1cast-away
1cast-away
USER since 2/2/09
Some people just don't know/were never taught how to handle a big fish. It's important if the fish (regardless of species) is going to be returned to the water. It's also important to keep the angler safe. Muskies are strong and full of teeth and often have mouths full of sharp hooks...which they have no problem driving into your hand. Some of the comment I've seen towards other fisherman are out of pure jealousy...that's easy to see and I can't explain that part. But if your going to do something..do it the right way.

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