reloading kits

12/22/14 @ 6:36 PM
ORIGINAL POST
cabinbum
cabinbum
USER since 4/1/10
looking to get a reloading kit and am at a loss as to which one to choose. want to keep it small scale and only load for a couple rounds. i know to be cautious with it and am not worried as i am very meticulous. also a couple ideas for manuals would be helpful. thanx guys
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 12 Posts
1/3/15 @ 11:51 AM
ditto
ditto
USER since 12/6/10
gotacarp, reloading for someone else for a profit is illegal. Even if it's not for a profit it's a very bad idea to do. Something happens and they will be sued for everything they own.

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1/3/15 @ 11:28 AM
Wieland Outdoors
Wieland Outdoors
USER since 3/27/10
For the price, the RCBS Master kit is a great starter and a VERY good quality press. Budget another couple hundred in Misc. Just don't dive into buying stuff that you don't need yet.

If your anywhere near me, your welcome to come and ask all the questions you want

As mentioned, Recobs, Midwestern, and a good mentor will help a lot.

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12/23/14 @ 6:50 PM
gotacarp
gotacarp
USER since 2/2/10
Does anyone reload 30/30? I have about 300 shells I would like to reload.my kids love to shoot my grandpa's 30/30. But I cant afford to keep buying them ammo. Any help? Ill pay for supplies.

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12/23/14 @ 6:17 PM
Guidedfishing
Guidedfishing
USER since 8/2/01
I might add if you have someone close by that reloads and you have the ability to sit with them, it will give you a better idea of the kind of questions to ask. Getting with someone knowledgeable will get you where your going a lot quicker.

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12/23/14 @ 6:08 PM
ditto
ditto
USER since 12/6/10
I STRONGLY suggest going to a store that sells a lot of reloading supplies such as Recobs or Midwestern Shooters Supply and have them set you up. They know what they're doing and they want your return business so they're not going to sell you junk you don't need or that will fall apart right away.

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12/23/14 @ 5:49 PM
Guidedfishing
Guidedfishing
USER since 8/2/01
There is a lot of good equipment out there, and you don't need to spend a fortune. I have multiple presses and crank out a couple hundred rounds a week during the winter getting ready for spring pistol competition. I would have to go count but off the top of my head I reload for about a dozen different cartridges. I have been loading since I was 15, so 35 + years, still using my original RCBS press.

Required items IMHO.

1. Single stage press, hard to beat a RCBS Rock Chucker

2. Quality scale. I have a single beam Redding that works well. I have a bottom line Lee scale which is marginal and I don't use it.

3. Powder Trickler, manual one is fine

4. Vernier caliper (Do not skip this one)

5. Case triming tool. You need this for any amount of reloading of Rifle cartridges.

6. Powder Measure, to dump charges close to what is needed and the trickler to get the exact charge in the pan. It will make your operation go quicker. Its more of nice to have, but you will go here any way so do it sooner than later and save yourself the headache.

7. If you don't get carbide die's you will need a way to lube and clean cases. carbide is great for pistol cases and high volume but not really needed for low volume rifle.

8. Hand tools for cleaning primer pockets and cleaning up case mouths after triming.

Hornady and RCBS make some nice kits. Lee does have some very good equipment for the price.

Get several books read and read some more. Don't take loads off the internet, and don't look through your books trying to find the hottest listed safe load. Its a fun hobby not scary, and just requires attention to detail. Do it when you won't be distracted.

Good luck

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12/23/14 @ 11:34 AM
DLAMA2
DLAMA2
USER since 5/1/05
I second Recob's target. Great people that also reload so they are not blowing smoke. If they do not know they find someone in the shop that does.

I have a Hornady turret. Have RCBS and Hornady dies. I bought the package deal a few years ago and have kept adding. I have the hornady and nosler books but will be adding barnes to the list as what I have read most western hunters use their bullets out there.

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12/23/14 @ 11:13 AM
muskrat30
muskrat30
USER since 10/14/01
Even starting out you could go piecemeal. Just look over the steps in a reloading manual, and search out the tools needed to do those steps.

A good amount of the accessories in a sales catalog are elective. Yes, as you go on you will want to add a few here and there.

The Sierra manual, and others, spells out the common steps of reloading very well.

Start with an easy cartridge, 38 SPCL is one.

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12/23/14 @ 10:40 AM
Badgerloader
Badgerloader
USER since 4/10/11
My comments are directed towards safety - NOT speed. First of all you need to invest in reloading manuals. I have Speer, Hornady, Lyman, Nosler and Lee. Read them. Read them again. You should also download powder manufacturers load tables. I consider a good mechanical scale as essential - I have a RCBS scale that has served well for 30 years. Get a powder trickler and a set of Lee scoops. Use a scoop to get just under the desired powder load into the scale cup and use the trickler to bring it up to desired weight. You don't need a powder measure to start out. I loaded for over 25 years before I got a Uniflow measure. I have two RCBS O-frame presses. I suggest you look at steel/cast iron frame presses from all the manufacturers. If I had to replace mine, I would buy Lee. I have dies from RCBS, Pacific and Lee. The last 5 die sets I have bought are Lee - cost effective and they work. I like priming cases with my Lee hand primer - it provides me with the sensitivity that I want to seat primers. You will need a vernier caliper to measure case length AFTER sizing and to measure overall length of a loaded round. You will need a way to trim cases that are too long. I use Lee case trimmers. I have a 1/4" drill in a horizontal mount to power my case trimming. You can also use the drill to spin cases so you can use steel wool to clean them - dirty cases can scratch dies. Go online and watch loading videos. Read everything you can find on reloading!!! If you still wanna reload - be safe and have fun.

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12/22/14 @ 7:18 PM
Tim_T
Tim_T
USER since 6/17/11
If you live anywhere near the Madison area, check out Recob's Target Shop in Prairie du Sac. They always have some started reloading set-ups on sale.

Tim

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 12 Posts