new to lake advice

7/4/14 @ 10:09 AM
ORIGINAL POST
ratherbhunten
ratherbhunten
USER since 11/18/02
so have been out twice, first morning one small fish, went last night 7/3/14 , from 5-10pm no bites, marked fish 80-100' so put downrigger to 90' with small dogger and fly,marked fish at 40-50' so put other downrigger there with dogger and fly, flyies are 24" loop to hook bottom, stacked lines with a spoon above 15', flys on dipsey (107mm)with 7' leaders , setting 3 and went anywhere from 50' to 125' out, moved them in and out and went up and down on riggers to see if any change in depth would help, was also marking fish at 20' range put dodger and fly on with 1.5 oz sinker and out 75' on outside planer boards, gps speeds 1.5-2.5 , played around with speed and different heading directions, at 9:45 we where marking fish at 20-30 that you could see on finder that would dive fast to 70' as boat passed over them, am I doing it all wrong or just not using correct colors, seen plenty of fish being cleaned as we drove away, got any advice pm me
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Displaying 1 to 5 of 5 Posts
7/6/14 @ 6:14 PM
pollockalope
pollockalope
USER since 6/30/08
Rath

Check you messneger.

Lope

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7/6/14 @ 3:22 PM
eye's r us
eye's r us
USER since 3/3/09
Sounds like your headed in the write direction. Don't expect to pound them every time out. I used to drive 3 hrs to fish Sheboygan and learned that I would have to get out more than once on a trip over and it makes all the difference. One time out it seems like the dead sea and the next they bite with abandon! Now I live in Kewaunee so I get out all the time and have been skunked here and there but have really tore them up too, even this year with the crazy cold water temps I have had a couple unbelievable trips. It seems you have to keep changing presentations until you find what they want. What killed them yesterday might not get a bite next time out. It's never automatic. One thing I learned is you have to speed it up a little from walleye trolling. It took me a long time to figure that out. Learn the angles of the downrigger cables. when you get bit on the rigger take note of the angle of the cable. Also how hard the dypsy rod is bending when it gets bit. The gps speed is a start but remember the current changes how hard you are pulling. Mine ranges from 2.3 to 3 mph on the gps most of the time. One thing I do every time out is use glow spoons and flashers when it gets dark. Use your spotlight to activate these so they last as long as they can.

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7/4/14 @ 12:11 PM
ratherbhunten
ratherbhunten
USER since 11/18/02
is there a range of depth for dodgers vs flashers? and when do you use spoon vs fly? when marking fish 90' plus down do you fish that deep? or are you better off keeping most lures up above in first 50'

sorry for my lack of knowledge on this I have spent hours reading and printing off tips but once your out there you start to wonder is it me or the fish and being almost a two hours drive would like to be prepared the best I can

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7/4/14 @ 10:40 AM
JamesD
JamesD
USER since 2/16/04
Dodgers are still my weapon of choice to dangle a fly or squid behind. Sounds like you did well in your effort to catch fish. My experience with dodgers is they're more speed sensitive than a spoon or rotating flasher. They tend to rock side to side at slow speeds(1.5) or spin wildly going fast. If you watch the rig just below the surface a while you see the action of each and it's effect on your rod tip, then you know that the deep dodger is rocking side to side but the occasional "flip" (or lack of), indicates currents might require a speed change. Keep trying.... Skunks happened in my boat last year. It didn't stop me from getting out to try again.

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