High Speed Salmon Trolling

1/5/16 @ 12:34 AM
ORIGINAL POST
5walleyes
5walleyes
USER since 3/12/10
So with salmon being a little more scarce these days, I got to thinking, what if we cranked up the trolling speed to cover more water and in theory come in contact with more fish? Most of us troll at about 2.5 mph. What if we cranked the speed up to 5 mph or even more? You could possibly double or triple the water covered. If the gear you were using could handle the higher speeds and still look good to the fish at those speeds, would you catch more fish by covering more water? Salmon are some of the fastest & strongest swimmers out there. Chasing down bait at 5mph should be nothing for them. Musky trollers usually start at about 5 mph and will take it up to 10 mph. Saltwater guys troll at speeds you could water ski at. How fast could we get away with if the lures & gear could handle the speed? Just throwing this out for discussion. I know most lures & gear are designed for use under 3 mph. If you were going to increase your speed what would you need to change in your set up to handle higher speeds?
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 10 Posts
1/18/16 @ 1:13 AM
5walleyes
5walleyes
USER since 3/12/10
It looks like Tomics are still being made. I pulled this info from their website...http://tomiclure.com/instructions/

Speed: An even side-to-side swimming action is best. The plug or spoon should not roll and if it does roll, it’s going too fast. It’s generally believed that plugs or spoons work best when trolled faster than you might troll when bait fishing. They’ll still work at a slow troll, but they’ll work better going faster (2.5 to 5 mph). If you’re trolling with the current, you’ll be going faster to get the right action, then when you turn around against the current, you’ll be trolling slower. If you’re using a downrigger the angle of the downrigger line is what you should note. Often a 45 degree angle is a good speed to aim for. Do note the angle of your downrigger line when you get a strike so you can aim for that speed again. If you’re using steel cable for downrigger line, it should be “singing”. Faster is generally better as long as the plug is not rolling over. If you’re familiar with salmon – they can swim really fast – so they have no trouble catching a fast lure. With a fast lure, we believe the fish is more likely to act on instinct and strike, but if the lure is ambling by, the fish won’t feel the urgency to catch it while he can.

Note if you do want to troll really fast (perhaps for tuna) and your plug is rolling over, you can change the hook to a bigger one, and that will act like a keel to allow for faster troll speed.

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1/16/16 @ 5:09 PM
ken88
ken88
USER since 4/24/07
There is a lure called Lil Thumper made by Big Jon. The older packaging advertised higher trolling speeds 5 mph. The new packaging does not advertise that and I am not sure if they changed the design. It is more popular around Ludington. I hear Stinger SS has a tolerance for higher speeds I try to recommend we put those SS's on when fishing my buddy's boat as he has a problem getting to lower speeds (7.4 Bravo 3 and no bags). We fish around the same areas as the charters and usually come back with comparable catches and less of a spread.

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1/12/16 @ 10:13 AM
L U E 42
L U E 42
USER since 7/13/09
Back in the 80s a tournament fisherman I know ran plugs at 4 to 5 mph with great success for fall kings. He used mostly Tomics. I have no idea if they still make them. J-Plugs are not effective that fast. I have a handful and have not been able to reproduce his results in more recent years. I attribute that to the much clearer water we fish in these days (since I hate to blame my lesser skills).

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1/8/16 @ 9:29 AM
BigMusky12
BigMusky12
MEMBER since 12/22/04
I heard of a guy who runs a high speed spoon program - where you have problems is with FF.

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1/7/16 @ 9:04 PM
5walleyes
5walleyes
USER since 3/12/10
I'm thinking crank baits of some sort might be the way to go. Or maybe the old school Spoon Plugs? Torpedo shaped downrigger weights?....crazy the things you think of when theres no ice to fish on.

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1/7/16 @ 8:06 PM
Gunsnbowses
Gunsnbowses
USER since 6/17/01
Pure speculation, but I don't think most spoons are designed to troll at high speeds. Just what that speed is...? And I'm not sure about leadcore either. Aren't salmon attracted to the slow rhythmic sweeping motion of leadcore? What happens to that as speed increases? But, as a friend of mine always says, "Don't be afraid to think outside the box!"

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1/5/16 @ 11:21 AM
lvtofish
lvtofish
USER since 2/2/05
I would think that dipsy's would be out...they would pull really hard and stress the equipment. riggers and leadcore would work.

as for lures....

spoons would run fine, not sure they would be effective. flashers i would think would spin too tightly.

brad's cut plugs would run ok.

interesting idea.

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1/5/16 @ 9:54 AM
fishmunkee
fishmunkee
USER since 3/20/02
I recall a guy at one of the LL Lake Mich outings saying he always trolled at 4 sog and did fine on salmon. Don't recall the screen name or know if he is still around.

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1/5/16 @ 8:32 AM
markrazzy
markrazzy
USER since 6/23/09
No idea about 5 mph. I think some guys do 3-4 for steelhead, have heard of faster. But I think to cover water, that might be a good idea, and then slow down once you find bait, fish, etc. Sometimes I think guys go a little fast - I caught kings this year focusing on 1.8-2.2 mph SOG in my kayak. But as long as you're using baits that can tolerate those high speeds, I think it'd work.

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