Depth estimates vs weight - coho rigs

4/27/15 @ 7:43 AM
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cycleguy
cycleguy
USER since 2/8/05
Typical coho rig, 00 dodger and fly. I'm running 12# mono on my walleye rigs on off-shore boards. First is it ok to use my snap weights on these versus in line weights? Most of mine have 1 oz on them, but I change out using bells or linty sinkers if that's ok? Any way of estimating depth with certain weights running 1.9 mph?
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4/30/15 @ 3:45 PM
luckylou
luckylou
USER since 8/25/11
lots of reasons your 'outside' boards may be getting hit more. Speed is only one of them. (stealth, lure/water dynamics, etc.).

Not a ton of coho around yet (in MKE) dont get discouraged.

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4/30/15 @ 10:24 AM
eyecatcher84
eyecatcher84
USER since 3/19/08
Not sure which post cycleguy was referring in regards to Jason's speed recommendation of 1.8-1.9 but I'm guessing that's "downspeed " which can vary significantly from GPS sog. I would say that 1.8-1.9sog is on the slow side of things for me and 2.5 is closer to what im usually running at. I do not have a depth raider, yet (waiting to see what this salmon fishery is going to do before investing another $500 into it) So, what I do for coho fishing is keep one dipsy up high to the point where I can see the dodger/ fly. I constantly adjust speed to get that dodger moving just right, and try to maintain that action. Perfect action seems to be when the dodger rocks side to side and then "spins out" every couple seconds. I've been told this is a stupid way to do things before, but it has worked well for me, and that high dipsy is usually one of top producing rods anyways...

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4/30/15 @ 9:14 AM
fishs
fishs
MEMBER since 2/17/04
I've been running 2.5 mph or so and am still getting passed by many boats. I also notice that more bites seem to come on the outside boards or faster moving vs the inside when making a turn. As for weights I just use those rubber core weights 3-4 ft in front of the dodger. Works for me.

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4/28/15 @ 11:56 AM
cycleguy
cycleguy
USER since 2/8/05
Caught my first couple fish on the dodgers today. 1 Brown, and a decent coho. Cool enough considering the water was rough, and I am new to the program. Both fish came using 3/4oz, back about thirty feet. Just enough to get it all down "a little".

Used Jason's point in another post about speed… 1.8-1.9. Notice it doesn't take a bunch more to get the dodgers spinning.

I use the light line, as I'm using my walleye stuff. I did by two more reels (Larger), and will spool them with Lake MI varieties of line for the future. Just getting my feet wet.

I think I'll go looking for one of Jason's schools in the future…. my learning curve could use the help. Having fun so far though.

Thanks all.

Edited on 4/28/15 12:32 PM
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4/28/15 @ 8:42 AM
Jason Woda
trophy hunter
USER since 9/1/01
Ditto on lucky Lou. These weights in the spring are not for depth purposes. Make sure u run your weights at a minimum 4 feet from ur dodger

(414) 384.8096
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4/28/15 @ 6:29 AM
migr8r
migr8r
USER since 2/8/11
I prefer 1/2 or 3/4 oz keel weights and I run 10 or 12 lb XT. I virtually always keep my lines in the top 10'. Depending on how deep I want them, I run them 15-40' from board to weight at 2mph. Typically in less than 20' of water, I want the D/F around 5' down and I'll use a 1/2oz weight and run them back 15-20'. If I'm out past 30' of water, I want them around 10' down and I'll use a 1/2oz weight and run them back 25-40' back. I actually seldomly use the 3/4 oz. I prefer the keel weights to eliminate any potential line twisting. About a 6' lead from weight to dodger.

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4/27/15 @ 11:06 PM
Tie1on
Tie1on
USER since 1/29/15
cycleguy,

Not trying to tell you you can't but I'd bump up that 12lb to at least 15. I run 20lb on my rigger rods and they double as my Coho board rods. You can do it...but if you have a nice BOW or KING take a rip on that set-up...you're probably gonna be out the whole deal from the board back. I run keel weights of 1 1/4oz for surface fishing. I'll run my outside boards leads back 50' and inside boards at 75'. Keep your weights close to the dodger...5-8' ahead of it, and then let your line back. IMHO the dodger acts a little better and a bit more consistent action as well.

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4/27/15 @ 4:00 PM
cycleguy
cycleguy
USER since 2/8/05
Perfect…. I'll run short leads off the boards and keep it light. Snap on weights keep it simple as well.

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4/27/15 @ 3:15 PM
luckylou
luckylou
USER since 8/25/11
name of the game with coho weights is simply getting the dodgers NOT to bounce/skim the surface.

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4/27/15 @ 2:41 PM
markrazzy
markrazzy
USER since 6/23/09
I don't see why which weights you use would make a difference. Especially in spring coho season. Here's a page that might help you estimate depths a bit. It's not exactly what you're looking for, but should help (50 feet of line out). http://www.offshoretackle.com/graphics/divecharts/50MethodRevised31412.pdf

Edited on 4/27/15 2:41 PM
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