coho dodger/fly leader length

4/16/14 @ 8:16 PM
ORIGINAL POST
Edward Felcohands
Edward Felcohands
USER since 2/24/09
I did some searching and got a little info but not enough. I'm going out in the kayak after come cohos soon. How long between the dodger and fly? 20 lb mono or heavy fluorocarbon? can the small coho dodgers be run with small spoons behind them? any input/tips would be great, I have never had the chance to troll cohos in a boat so there are some details I am lacking. I'd like to see how it is done but guys get creeped out when you hang around mckinley and get all lathered up over their gear. I have an assortment of spoons but the coho specific rigs are very new to me.
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 18 Posts
4/22/15 @ 7:49 AM
sslayer
sslayer
USER since 6/9/06
The reasoning behind using fly leaders made with fluorocarbon or monofilament in rated weights of 40 to 60 pounds is the leader is stiffer and will impart more of the flasher/dodger action into the fly, with fluorocarbon leader material, not line, being the stiffest. That said you’ll also find tying knots in 50# leaders of any material is challenging and will take some getting used to before you develop knot techniques that work for you.

Good Luck

SS

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4/19/15 @ 6:19 PM
Fisher123
Fisher123
USER since 7/6/06
I have read a lot of information around the lb test for peanut/coho flies. When you talk normal flies, it is fairly common to see the range be 40-60 lb test. What I see with coho/peanut flies is people run anywhere from 20-50 lb test. Seeing that coho are more or less ambushing the flies, would the lb test make a huge difference? I read a lot of people running 25-30 lb fluorocarbon on these. Thoughts?

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4/28/14 @ 6:10 PM
sylvan81
sylvan81
USER since 5/23/12
From the top of the loop to the bottom of the treble hook. Just make them all the same size

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4/28/14 @ 3:22 PM
hypovolemicshock
hypovolemicshock
USER since 6/20/11
When you say 18" lead where are you measuring from? I think my current leads are a little short and before I change them I just wanted to double check where you measure from.

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4/25/14 @ 2:35 PM
swamphunter
swamphunter
USER since 2/12/02
Great info guys. Is the top 30 ft of the water column where you are fishing the cohos this time of year? or all summer long up that high generally?

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4/22/14 @ 1:39 PM
MuskyHunter
MuskyHunter
USER since 6/17/01
1.9 1.9 1.9!

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4/22/14 @ 8:30 AM
luckylou
luckylou
USER since 8/25/11
I'm jumpin on the Woda Wagon here. I used to be in the same boat as many of you, running all sorts of different leads...thinking I was "diversifying" my strategy.

Wrong-O! 18" is what works. Jason's right, if you run all sorts of different leads you have very little to attribute success or failure to. Run them all the same, and you can focus on other, more important things.

+1 on the 18" lead.

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4/22/14 @ 8:29 AM
fishmunkee
fishmunkee
USER since 3/20/02
What speed do you find optimal for running the coho dodger/fly rigs? Thanks.

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4/22/14 @ 8:13 AM
Jason Woda
trophy hunter
USER since 9/1/01
Im not saying 12 wont work, it will. You will catch fish with whatever you fish with, but adding the variable of 2 different sizes can throw you off. When you catch a few then you have to ask more questions like, was it the lead, the color of fly, where the bait was in your spread, your speed. Too many questions. If they are all the same lead it eliminates a number of those questions. I love discussions like this. Gets the brain working. BTW. Caught 16 cohos yesterday on 18" leads lol

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4/21/14 @ 7:00 PM
Loose Drag Fishing
Loose Drag Fishing
USER since 4/8/11
I run both 12" and 18". I will run all 12" on one side and 18" on the other. Then I let the fish decide. There are days when the 12" dominate and then there are days where the 18" dominate. In short There is a time for both lengths.

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 18 Posts