bleeding out salmon

5/23/14 @ 3:11 PM
ORIGINAL POST
svitreum
svitreum
USER since 8/29/06
Over the years I have been on a dozen different charters and none of them bleed out their catch, just throwing them in a cooler to flop around and turn into a U after rigor mortis sets in. This is practiced heavily out west and seems to be ignored here. Just wondering why? I myself have been neglectful, but I am changing my ways this year. If anyone is already doing this please chime in and add your thoughts. Thanks. Jimmy
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8/4/15 @ 5:58 PM
fowl_language
fowl_language
USER since 8/4/15
Out west we bled every salmon that came over the side. I got buddies I fish with out of Milwaukee now and every coho and chinook that comes over the side I shake my head when they don't cut the gills. Just something we always did on the ocean. The fish out of L.Michigan just don't taste the same, not sure if it's the freshwater or the bleeding but they just don't. I still smoke them though when we get some silvers or kings.

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7/16/15 @ 8:52 AM
A5¢
A5¢
MEMBER since 6/15/09
Dick Neefe on the Mississippi River taught me to severe the tail before tossing cats in the cooler and it does make the fillets whiter. The cooler on the other hand.... Smile

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7/16/15 @ 8:23 AM
dbuchmann
dbuchmann
USER since 2/17/05
I guided in Alaska for a summer and was told by my boss that as soon as you land a fish cut the gills and let it bleed out. Practiced this and had very nice looking fillets.

Edited on 7/16/15 8:45 AM
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7/15/15 @ 7:10 PM
Mike Nitro
Mike Nitro
USER since 4/3/14
I tried this on a couple salmon this year and admit that it makes cleaning much nicer- no bloody mess to deal with and the fillets are blood-free. Use a scissors to snip the gills and they bleed out quickly.

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7/25/14 @ 7:47 AM
BugleTrout
BugleTrout
USER since 9/27/01
I have been out on Lake Michigan charters in the past. Probably 4 or 5 of them and I agree, none of them bleed their fish. When I was in Alaska, every captain or guide ripped the gills as soon as the fish were landed. Some claim that Lake Michigan salmon taste the same as Alaskan salmon but I totally disagree. Maybe that's due to not bleeding them.

I'm setting up my boat for Michigan yet this summer and plan to attach a cord with a clip on it to attach to the fish. I can drag them behind the boat for a few minutes after I clip the gills. Who knows, maybe this will even attract a few fish into my spread.

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7/21/14 @ 9:01 AM
svitreum
svitreum
USER since 8/29/06
After about 5 trips under my belt now where I am bleeding out all my fish I can say I would never go back to just throwing them "in the box". Immediately after netting them I bonk them to stun them and then cut the gills while the fish is hanging over the side on a stringer that is attached to a cleat on the boat. I noticed that the fight the fish puts up causes the blood to really be pumping and it squirts out pretty hard most of the time. After about 15 minutes or so I place them in a cooler with an ice slurry (ice and cold salt water). To some this is just nonsense and too much work. I love salmon and appreciate the delicate nature of the flesh so I see this as completely necessary. When cleaning them I do not have to rinse them at all and people have commented to me how nice the fillets look. We are catching less fish per trip these days (as are most) and want to have the best looking and tasting fillets possible. I highly recommend this to everyone. I believe that a good charter boat could distinguish themselves by following these practices. So far I know of none that practice it.

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5/27/14 @ 10:44 AM
svitreum
svitreum
USER since 8/29/06
OK. Yesterday I cut each fish's gills with scissors and placed them in the live-well with water running continuously. When I filleted them it was like night and day. Almost no blood leaking out onto the fillets while cleaning which made it much better. I do not like to rinse the fillets at the station (salmon is very delicate)and I pat them down just before I vacuum seal them at home. I have not tried any yet so taste wise I can't chime in. I gave them to the other guys with me. Next time I will keep a few coho fillets and try them out and see for myself. Just the fact that cleaning them is so much nicer makes me want to continue this practice. When the surface water warms, I will put them on a stringer over the side of the boat to bleed out and after 10 minutes put them on ice.

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5/26/14 @ 12:52 PM
thinblueline
thinblueline
USER since 1/25/10
I bled them out for a while by cutting their gills with a pair of scissors. I finally stopped after realizing that, to me, I couldn't detect a dang bit of difference between fillets that came from bled fish, as opposed to those that had not been bled.

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5/26/14 @ 7:06 AM
muskymike275
muskymike275
USER since 1/6/08
I always bleed any fish after catching if its going to be eaten. You are missing out if you do not bleed the salmon. Put them in the cooler with some lake water and pop or cut a gill. It is going to be bloody but will look and taste great on the table. Next time out bleed one and don't bleed one and look at the difference then you can decide.

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5/24/14 @ 6:01 PM
muffstuffer
muffstuffer
USER since 1/15/09
Agreed but if you're someone like me who usually cleans them at home it's a good idea

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