Questions about casting cranks on Winnebago.

7/10/14 @ 4:09 PM
ORIGINAL POST
Pocket
Pocket
USER since 10/21/10
I've been fishing Winnebago for a number of years now and one technique I haven't had much luck with is casting cranks for Walleyes. Could someone give me some general areas to try or tell me what I should be looking for like rocks, weeds, water depth, wind direction? Could use some help. Thanks Pocket.
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Displaying 1 to 4 of 4 Posts
10/24/14 @ 10:39 AM
Troy Stoeger
tstoeger
USER since 4/2/02
Back when I used to fish walleyes more, we always did well casting cranks on dead calm days. Circle the reefs and cast straight across so the bait follows the contour, usually bites would occur right after the bait would leave bottom on the shallowest part of the reef heading out into more open water.

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10/23/14 @ 1:49 PM
wtw_fisherman
wtw_fisherman
USER since 8/12/09
I haven't fished Winnebago for awhile, but when I was this is how I did it. When the walleyes come back down from the spawn, end of April or so. The reefs buy the mouth of the Fox would be the first to try this for the month of May. As things move on move to the reefs north or south also. I like wind, the more the better. Use a drift sock or two if needed to slow down. Have at least two good casting rods with high speed reels 6:1 or 7:1. Rig one with a 5' deep running crankbait(Shad Rap) and one with a 10-12' bait(Wallie diver etc.) Start the drift in water deeper than 12' and toward the 5' deepth of the reef. Cast the 12' runner at 45 angle with the wind, crank it down, then reel and work the bait back to the boat. Many hits at boat side. As the water get shallower move the the 5' bait as you drift across the reef, on back side go back the 12' bait. If the Zebra muscles are to bad you may have to use a short steel leader or 20-30# mono. When going back to start the drift over do not drive your boat over the previous drift if you caught a fish, go the the right or left of the drift at least a cast distance, then line up right over if you caught one or to the side if you did not. move along and fish the whole reef. Works best last 2 hours of the day.

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7/10/14 @ 4:20 PM
ZTates
ZTates
USER since 5/23/08
I've had luck doing this in two scenarios. The first was offshore early in the summer on rocky shorelines. Usually with the most success at dusk into evening. The second is when there is a good chop on the reefs along the west shore. In this case we'd move around on the reef until we got bit. In the second scenario slip bobbers or jigging would have probably worked as well. Essentially is was just another way to focus on a specific area that we thought should be holding fish.

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