Gobies

Displaying 1 to 10 of 13 Posts
9/9/15 @ 9:38 AM
John.Rennpferd
John.Rennpferd
USER since 6/3/10
As I understand it fowl transmission is a 1% chance per year; however, it can be lower depending on the distance between warerbodies. Just nature in progress.

Hopefully the bass population demolishes, and controls the gobies.

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9/8/15 @ 7:56 PM
Stitzo
Stitzo
USER since 6/15/01
Thanks ZTates. I thought something went on down-system to try & stop the influx of upbound critters.

Can't stop water birds from flying with stuff on their feet or regurgitating still-live undesirable species, though.

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9/8/15 @ 2:53 PM
Stitzo
Stitzo
USER since 6/15/01
Duhhh on my part. Newly dug ponds that aren't stocked get fish populations in them from fertile spawn being carried in on waterfowl feet. Guess I need a tutorial on goby spawning habits.

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9/8/15 @ 2:27 PM
lakeshiner
lakeshiner
USER since 7/20/09
Could have been natural too, in the case of say a pelican on GB taking a trip to the river or Bago and somehow transplanting them. That is another thing that was not around in the past.

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9/8/15 @ 2:21 PM
ZTates
ZTates
USER since 5/23/08
Some of the locks are operational. From Wrightstown north to the bay all are in use. However one of the locks south of Wrightstown toward Kaukaukna(and towards Winnebago) is actually filled with concrete. They did this to prevent this type of thing from happening(lamprey). The gobies did not swim through the locks from Green Bay to Winnebago.

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9/8/15 @ 1:18 PM
Robbollio
Robbollio
USER since 10/17/04
I remember personally seeing the locks work about 10 years ago. Gobies were hard up in lake Michigan by then. If they are still in use it has absolutely nothing to do with stupid boaters. Just a goby swimming in when the locks open and swimming out when the other side opens. Does anyone know for sure if the locks are still used or have been at least once in 10 years? Only takes that single time...

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9/8/15 @ 1:17 PM
Stitzo
Stitzo
USER since 6/15/01
I hope they taste like smelt once the scalloped pectoral fin is removed.

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9/8/15 @ 11:26 AM
Stitzo
Stitzo
USER since 6/15/01
Correct me if I'm wrong here please, but hasn't the Lower Fox been shut down to navigation between the 'Bago system and Green Bay for many years in order to prevent invasives coming in from the Great Lakes? With that being my understanding & also having a bit of knowledge about gobie's swimming abilities & territorial tendencies, there's not much that can be done about them if uneducated, uninformed, arm-chair biologists transplant them.

Someone once said "You can't fix stupid". Dull Dull Dull

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9/7/15 @ 11:31 PM
Robbollio
Robbollio
USER since 10/17/04
Maybe its time to protect the bigger girls... and put a slot on the lake.

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9/6/15 @ 2:43 PM
perch chaser
perch chaser
USER since 2/6/03
Pretty sure Lake Erie contains gobies? It seems to have healthy populations of smbass, walleyes, and perch. Just another food source for them. I'm not avocating bring on the gobies, but who knows if they will even adapt to lake Winnebago conditions. Might be a little to soon to hit the panic button?

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 13 Posts