'taters

9/28/15 @ 11:20 AM
ORIGINAL POST
RichManitoba
RichManitoba
USER since 5/22/15
A neighbor dropped off "a lot" of potatoes from his family farm. I'd say most are about tennis ball size. What do you guys do with your potatoes? Should I slice them up in different varieties right away and freeze them? I've already cut some wedges and popped them in the freezer. Of course, I scrubbed them and left the skins on! Tounge Out
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Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 Posts
10/2/15 @ 11:14 PM
BOBBYB
BOBBYB
USER since 5/24/03
We slice them into fried potatoes and deep fry til they float. Drain and freeze on cookie sheet. Store in freeor in 5gallon bucket with lid. Want fried taters take out what you want. Make into hash browns by covering them in skillet till soft and chopping with metal spatula. did 100 lbs a year ago

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10/2/15 @ 3:04 PM
RichManitoba
RichManitoba
USER since 5/22/15
Thanks for the tips; good to know. I didn't clean all of them, just enough to put in a large baggie and freeze. I've found a dark, cold place in the basement to store the remainder.

I can't wait to get some fillets and fry them up with the fresh 'taters.

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9/28/15 @ 6:18 PM
prop-buster
prop-buster
USER since 6/14/05
thanks nihsif....had a guy bring those on a trip to Canada, easy and they were really good...way better than buying the frozen wedges and baking them......

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9/28/15 @ 6:01 PM
nihsif
nihsif
MEMBER since 6/15/01
nice PB!

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9/28/15 @ 5:50 PM
prop-buster
prop-buster
USER since 6/14/05
you could take some of them and slice them into wedges, coat with any seasoning you prefer and deep fry them. Apple slicer would probably work pretty good for that.

put single layer on a cookie sheet and freeze them, take them out and move to zip lock bags, (however many you want to a bag) and put them back into the freezer. When needed just take a package out and nuke em (time depending on your nuker 1 1/2 - 2 minutes).

works good if you are having a fish fry for a couple people, or heck just for a quick snack.

for heaven's sake don't peel them Sweating

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9/28/15 @ 11:43 AM
BeerTownFyreman
BeerTownFyreman
USER since 6/15/01
We had a pretty good tater crop this year.

In addition to regular storage, like mentioned below in our root cellar, we canned 21 quarts. We used the smaller potatoes for this and saved the larger ones in the cellar.

I'll leave out the canning basics, such as jar and lid prep, etc

Peel and wash, and cut into 1-2 inch pieces. Place in water to keep from discoloring.

Bring to a boil and simmer for 4 minutes.

Add 1 tsp salt to quart jar (ready for canning) and fill jars with hot prepared taterz, leaving no more than 1 inch head space.

Cover taterz with fresh boiling water. Leave 1 inch head space and make sure to cover all pieces of taterz. Use wooden spoon handle to work all air out and refill with water to 1 inch.

Process 40 minutes with 10 lbs weighted gauge on pressure cooker. Again, this recipe leaves out the canning prep/instructions. Elevation changes may be necessary.

These are similar to store bought canned taterz, but with a better flavor. They take up less space, and last longer than storing fresh in cellar.

We add them at the end to lot's of soups, stews, and casseroles. They are also good pan fried in some butter.

We also mixed the varieties. We like that each bite can offer a different flavor or texture. We had russets, Kennebec's, red's and Yukon's all peeled and mixed randomly.

We are already making plans to plant/can more next year, as we're going to be woefully short with this batch.

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9/28/15 @ 11:24 AM
Dave (Golden)
Dave (Golden)
MEMBER since 6/22/01
I get a big box from friends in Idaho every year....

Proper Storage

Store potatoes in a cool, well ventilated place.

Colder temperatures lower than 50 degrees, such as in the refrigerator, cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooked. If you do refrigerate, letting the potato warm gradually to room temperature before cooking can reduce the discoloration.

Avoid areas that reach high temperatures (beneath the sink or beside large appliances) or receive too much sunlight (on the countertop).

Perforated plastic bags and paper bags offer the best environment for extending shelf-life

Keep potatoes out of the light.

Don’t wash potatoes (or any produce, for that matter) before storing. Dampness promotes early spoilage.

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9/28/15 @ 11:23 AM
Prop
Prop
USER since 4/9/03
If you didn't clean them you could store them in the basement. They would of lasted couple months in a cool dark room.

Grandparents use to store couple hundred bushels in the cellar all winter. Just make sure they are dry and not stored or piled up right out of the ground.

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