Plumbing

1/18/16 @ 10:49 AM
ORIGINAL POST
Dave (Golden)
Dave (Golden)
MEMBER since 6/22/01
Anyone ever change the Blatter (Air Cell) on a Pressure Tank on a well water supply.. (Well Mate pressure tank) I determined yesterday that the Blatter failed since my well pump was short cycling. Appears that the cell can be changed, but the kit is proving not to be the easiest to get my hands on. Just looking for advise if I should try it myself or leave it to a Plumber.. I have it band-aided for the moment. I was able to drain the tank and then allow for the tank to partially fill and work properly, I assume it will work until the water adsorbs the air in the cell. Thanks..
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 63 Posts
4/29/18 @ 9:29 AM
big mac
big mac
MEMBER since 2/19/02

Thanks for the input, expertise,  and knowledge. 

Big Mac 

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4/29/18 @ 8:03 AM
Plmlk
Plmlk
MEMBER since 12/18/07

Pex is the way to go.  If it freezes, it won't make a mess, you just won't have any water until it thaws.  Pex is also much easier to run.  

If there is any chance of freezing - Pex is the best choice.  

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4/29/18 @ 7:42 AM
12packabs
12packabs
USER since 12/19/06

With multiple pipe bursts, it sounds like you need to a better job of draining your plumbing when you winterize.  No pipe material is better than pex for handling a solid hard freeze, but most fittings used on pex will not handle repeated hard freezes, thus making pex fittings susceptible as well.

I would NOT re-plumb with PVC.  First choice pex, second copper.  Both are significantly more expensive than PVC, the cost is worth it.  If you leave copper exposed, try to get a plumber with a Pro Press tool for the fittings....they look cleaner than sweat fittings, although a good plumber can make solder joints look pretty good with a little extra effort.

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4/28/18 @ 11:09 PM
poptop
poptop
USER since 10/1/03

Well you know no me I’m old school so i did my cabin in copper. However pex is a good way to go probably cheaper to have installed. Either way I would definitely get them out of the attic if you dont winterize the cabin.feel free to give me a ring if you want to talk about it. If you do run them inside and plan to leave them exposed copper will look better. 

Edited on 4/28/18 11:14 PM
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4/28/18 @ 5:15 PM
Pool8
Pool8
USER since 1/27/17

You might opt for pex tubing it is more burst resistant, also if in your attic lay your pipes rite on the rafters and pile insulation on it ,from experience this will help .

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4/28/18 @ 4:11 PM
big mac
big mac
MEMBER since 2/19/02

Howdy Poptop! Haven't seen you on here in a while. 

My question, I've had my PVC water pipes burst on me twice now (time for a newer & better furnace). My current water pipes are in my attic. I'm thinking about paying the extra money to have them routed on my ceiling inside the cabin. Should I use PVC or switch to brass/metal?

Thanks, 

Big Mac 

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4/28/18 @ 3:41 PM
poptop
poptop
USER since 10/1/03

Just poke em thru. Some toilets have a large jet down in the trap it can clog up too if yours has one poke it out too.

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4/26/18 @ 8:50 PM
river_chaser
river_chaser
USER since 10/3/12

I might try anything that doesnt get my head dirty

Many Thanks

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4/26/18 @ 8:16 PM
12packabs
12packabs
USER since 12/19/06

There's all kinds of complicated ways to dissolve the precipitated mineral, and plenty of acids to do it, but the previous post is the easiest...poke 'em till they run.

If the deposits are truly too deep to poke holes, then chemicals are necessary.  I never saw the putty method in person, but it sounds pretty good to me...


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4/26/18 @ 8:03 PM
poptop
poptop
USER since 10/1/03

Poke the holes thru. I usually use my allen key a small one just feel where the jets are and poke it thru

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 63 Posts