Need Advice on 7-Weight Rod

11/20/14 @ 5:50 AM
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walleye fisherman
walleye fisherman
USER since 2/7/10
Hey fellow fly fisherman, I am looking to purchase a 7-weight rod for using on some rivers and lakes targeting bass, carp, and maybe the occasional northern. First is a 7-weight the best choice for this situation? I don't want to be limited in the size flies I can cast, but I don't want to have a rod that is so stiff you just feel like you're reeling in a sock because there is no fight. I have been looking at the Orvis Clearwater in the 9' 6" length (for no particular reason), but I was wondering if there are any other suggestions. My budget for the rod is about $250. Thanks in advance for your help! Jake
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11/25/14 @ 9:39 PM
Troy Stoeger
tstoeger
USER since 4/2/02
Glad we could help. You will like that rod. It definitely doesn't perform like a $200 rod, those Clearwaters are impressive sticks.

Troy Stoeger Guide Service
(920) 277-5578
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11/24/14 @ 10:24 AM
drummer boy
drummer boy
USER since 3/14/08
You made a good choice I use a 7 weight and a 9 but if I only had one it would definitely be an 8.

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11/24/14 @ 6:29 AM
walleye fisherman
walleye fisherman
USER since 2/7/10
Thanks Jason and Troy, I did order the Clearwater, and will be picking up the airflo due to the fact that you guys' know your stuff so obviously I should follow your lead. Thank you for your help!

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11/21/14 @ 10:57 PM
Troy Stoeger
tstoeger
USER since 4/2/02
I think Jason has you covered on the lines there. If you are willing to pay for it, look at the Orvis Hydros bass bug lines as well.

Regarding the reels, you said the Sage has the name behind it, Orvis doesn't? Company has been around like 160 years and as good as anyone else out there. I would go for the Clearwater reel. Disclaimer, I am very biased but it is, in large part because their stuff is so good. Those Clearwater reels are bulletproof in both design and execution, that and Orvis just plain stands behind their stuff. Return it at any time, for any reason and they will take care of you. I guess the short answer is save the $50 and grab the Orvis reel.

Troy Stoeger Guide Service
(920) 277-5578
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11/21/14 @ 6:41 PM
Jason Stewart
West Fork Jason
USER since 2/1/14
The Rio Gold is more of a long, supple, trout taper line. I've used it to cast dry flies, nymphs, and very small streamers for browns and rainbows with my 4 weight.

You'll be able to cast bigger flies easier and longer into the day with something that has a shorter more dense head. That Airflo 40 plus in my other post is a good example. They also have a warranty on their lines, they will send you a replacement when you return a defective line. Cheers! JS

Edited on 11/21/14 6:49 PM
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11/21/14 @ 10:30 AM
walleye fisherman
walleye fisherman
USER since 2/7/10
Thanks Troy for your input, I think I am going to go with a TFO Professional II 8-weight, as it is a good price and I have read only positive reviews about it. I am debating between the Orvis Clearwater and the Sage 2200 for reels. The Sage looks really nice and it has the name behind it, but is it worth the extra $50? I think I will then match that with Rio Gold Floating 8wt WF line, and then eventually invest in some Rio Density Compensated Sink Tip Line in 250 grain, does that sound like a good match for my rod assuming I will be using that for casting streamers and the like?

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11/21/14 @ 7:14 AM
Troy Stoeger
tstoeger
USER since 4/2/02
With versatility in mind, I would go with an 8 weight. I fish an 8 here for smallies, then again, they tend to run large and as such, the flies do too. I mean, an experienced caster can throw a heavily weighted clouser or something with a 4 weight but there are better tools for the job. I think you are on the right track with the Orvis Clearwater. They are nice rods, 25 year no fault warranty as well. Casting a big wet bunny fly for pike with a 7 weight all day will make you wish you went heavier.

Agreed on the advice about a quality line as well. Whatever line you opt for, get one of the heavy front tapered lines to turn over those big nasty flies.

Troy Stoeger Guide Service
(920) 277-5578
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11/20/14 @ 10:00 AM
Jason Stewart
West Fork Jason
USER since 2/1/14
No matter what rod you end up getting, the fly line you buy is the more important part of the equation. Don't drop nearly three hundred bucks on a rod and cheap out with an on sale 30 dollar fly line.

For the type of fishing you're going to be doing, I would recommend an Airflo 40 plus in whatever weight rod you end up with just to get you started.

http://www.airflofishing.com/airflo-fly-lines-forty-plus-floating-forty-plus_us.cfm

Soon you'll find out you can't effectively catch fish near the surface with a floating line all the time, and you'll want to also get a sinking line to catch fish deeper in the water. (check out the streamer max line by Airflo)

All my warm water rods are 9'. I think that extra 6" would be helpful when highsticking nymphs for trout etc...

When it comes to SMB fishing, I run a 5-6 for small poppers and a 7-8 for streamers.

Check out Temple Fork Outfitters rods also, you can get a nice stick with out breaking the bank.

You're on the right track starting with a 7 or 8.

Edited on 11/20/14 10:03 AM
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11/20/14 @ 9:35 AM
walleye fisherman
walleye fisherman
USER since 2/7/10
Would I be better off with an 8 weight? Would that be more versatile? Or is that going to be too heavy for smallmouth fishing?

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11/20/14 @ 8:24 AM
RockRiverTom
RockRiverTom
USER since 4/27/02
A 7 weight would be a great choice for smallmouth bass and carp. I've got an older 9'6" 7 weight Orvis and it's a great rod for smallmouth. It wouldn't be my first choice for large streamers for pike or big hair bugs for largemouth, but would work o.k.

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