Juneau county reports

10/27/12 @ 9:06 AM
ORIGINAL POST
duckman05
duckman05
USER since 1/6/11
Haven't seen any on Juneau yet, figured I would chime in. I hunt southern juneau, sat last night have 12 doe it a cut corn field....Not bucks to be seen. Have noticed a few scrapes. Also noticed there are not many dead deer on the roads around here yet, compared to Monore and Jackson co. Think the best is to come this week and next. Happy hunting.
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 321 Posts
7/18/18 @ 1:24 PM
sauger
sauger
USER since 6/19/01

I have land near Necedah and planted purple top turnips and brassica a few years ago and they did awesome.  Tried again 2 years later in the same plot after planting oats and they did not do well.  I talked to a neighbor down the road and he said that the brassicas take a huge amount of nutrients out of the soil and not to plant them often in the same spot. 


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7/9/18 @ 1:22 PM
BigHorn
BigHorn
USER since 10/24/11

Two years ago my brassica plot (purple top turnips, rapeseed and forage radishes) were awesome.  The deer loved them as well.  They were in there all winter digging them up.  Last year they barely came up.  I think I may have disced them in too deep.  I tilled them under in August since it was just weeds and replanted with the rye, oats, clover, forage peas mix that I plant in August plots.  I think I'm going to get a hand seeder for the brassicas instead of using my atv mounted one.  The seeds are so small it's hard to tell the coverage.  They really hammered the winter rye this spring when the snow finally melted. 

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7/7/18 @ 11:10 AM
Casedog
Casedog
USER since 10/4/11

Killing off some of my food plots for my traditional August planting and thought I would bring the good old Juneau County Archery page back to the top!! The deer really hammered my purple top turn ups and Raddishes last year so I will be planting more of that this year and just curious if and what anyone else has had success with in that area?? Deer herd seems to be in excellent shape for the upcoming season and already extremely excited for another season!! I know there are a couple public land giants that will be on many people’s eyes and I wish everyone a successful, enjoyable, and memorable season ahead!! Practice now and shoot straight!!

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12/3/17 @ 12:39 PM
waltereye sr.
waltereye sr.
USER since 6/25/01

Painting the trunks also keeps the moles away in winter.  Otherwise they can kill the tree by eating a ring around the bottom 

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12/1/17 @ 2:14 PM
hockeyguy39
hockeyguy39
USER since 8/24/07

Interesting. Thanks for the info!

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12/1/17 @ 1:37 PM
badgerfowl1
badgerfowl1
USER since 10/1/12

Hockeyguy,

Painting the trunks is supposed to help protect the trunk from sun-scald (or southwest injury) during the winter time when the temps rise (sap runs) and then freezes at night and splits the trunk.

Also helps to identify if borers are getting into the trunks.

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12/1/17 @ 1:29 PM
badgerfowl1
badgerfowl1
USER since 10/1/12

Bighorn

Here's a link to a chart for apple disease resistance. I base most of my plantings on DR, cold hardiness, and drop time. 

Apple Disease Resistance

Looking at Wallace's apple list, I'd plant the following:

Liberty, Freedom, Enterprise, Haralson, Honeycrisp, and Sweet 16 (great flavor!).  I've got all but the Haralson from other sources.

Also don't be afraid to plant crabapples. Some get almost 2" and are even edible and taste great.

From their list, I'd plant the following.

Centennial, Chestnut, Dolgo, & Whitney.  I've planted all but the Whitney from other sources.

Good luck with your planting! It's addictive for sure.

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12/1/17 @ 9:33 AM
BigHorn
BigHorn
USER since 10/24/11

Thanks for the good info!!  I'm just north of Necedah.  The place in Neillsville seems to do a good job with recommending what to plant in the area.  I guess we'll see what mother nature has in store for me.  I just love the work that goes into the hunt.  Managing the land by doing some tree cutting, food plots, apple trees.  It makes it pretty cool when the deer show up on camera and I get an opportunity at one.  

Thanks for the spraying tip!  I wasn't sure what to do there.  

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12/1/17 @ 9:19 AM
hockeyguy39
hockeyguy39
USER since 8/24/07

What does painting the trunks accomplish? Make it less desirable for something to gnaw on?

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11/30/17 @ 4:43 PM
badgerfowl1
badgerfowl1
USER since 10/1/12

My advice for as maintenance-free as possible apple trees is to plant disease resistant varieties.  The three major ones are Liberty, Freedom, and Enterprise. There are others that have resistance to some things but not everything.  Those three are pretty bullet proof.

The 2nd issue is cold hardiness. Those trees should be good to zone 4. Iffy for zone 3. Not sure what zone you'll be planting them in.

As for spraying, I just use the simple Bonide fruit tree spray after bloom when I see insects. Being that most of the trees I've planted have some sort of disease resistance, my main issue is insects.  Bonide or Sevin are my go to sprays.  There are more expensive sprays but I don't bother. These are for the deer. And were quite tasty this September/October when I picked a few for myself.

The main diseases to look for resistance to are Apple Scab, Fireblight, and Cedar-Apple Rust.  I look for a tree to at least have resistance to Fireblight as that crap seems like a pain to deal with. CAR and Scab are more cosmetic.

Protecting them from deer browsing and mice/vole girdling are also a top priority.  5' or 6' fencing and aluminum window screen around the bottom of the trunks is a good way to do that.

Window screen isn't attached in the pic because I was painting the trunks but you can see what I'm talking about at least.

Edited on 11/30/17 4:49 PM
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Displaying 1 to 10 of 321 Posts