Best Walleye fishing lake in northern Wisconsin?

3/26/11 @ 1:56 PM
ORIGINAL POST
kzfisher
kzfisher
USER since 8/15/08
a smaller lake (under 1000 acres) that has an abundancy of smaller walleyes would be good if you want to catch fish or a bigger lake that has a good amount of walleyes such as Turtle flambeau flowage, LVD, LCO, etc and use a guide for a day to learn the lake.

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 39 Posts
4/25/12 @ 8:46 AM
JC-Wisconsin
JC-Wisconsin
USER since 4/1/05
"I don't know how spawning competition and growth rates effect the populations. I don't know either how the aging of the flowage plays in."

From my understanding, LM bass prey on walleye fry, which leads me to believe that LM bass inhabit the same areas as fry throughout spring and summer. For whatever reason, SM bass have not been shown to significantly impact walleye reproductive success. In lakes nearby the Chip area, LM bass populations have exploded to the point where their growth rates have plummeted resulting in some fish never to even reach 14" in length which compounds the problem as fishermen kept few bass. Smallmouth growth rates have shown slight decreases in these lakes, but not nearly what LM bass have experienced. Walleye growth rates appear to be mostly unaffected although numbers have decreased noticeably. I was also told that oligotrophic lakes in the area would almost be unnoticable for aging in a person's lifetime to a more eutrophic lake. I would suspect that the flowage would be somewhat different, but being the Chip has stained water and a lot of rock and sand to begin with, I don't know if we could notice a significant change during the span of our lifetimes. I would suspect too high of LM bass populations is the problem on the Chip as well. Just a guess.

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4/24/12 @ 7:45 PM
HodakaD
HodakaD
USER since 4/28/08
Overall I would say Green Bay or Winnibago or Petenwell. If you want to go to the north part of the state, it depends. Would you prefer to fish a lake where the daily limit is 2 fish over 15", or a lake with a 3 fish limit, where only one can be over 15? Lips Sealed If you like to troll and come north, be aware that most lakes don't allow it. Good luck wherever you go!!

Edited on 4/24/12 7:46 PM
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4/24/12 @ 6:53 PM
emceemc
emceemc
USER since 9/18/01
Largemouth have definitely increased, especially on the west side. The Chippewa is rockier on the east side, where I fish and smallmouth are the common bass. The east and west are the same body, but somewhat distinct on structure.

I don't know how spawning competition and growth rates effect the populations. I don't know either how the aging of the flowage plays in.

I like catching the smallmouth, and am not complaining. I think the flowage is healthy. I do think they should stop protecting the bass population with the CR-only early season and 14 inch limits. The population just doesn't require it.

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4/24/12 @ 7:17 AM
JC-Wisconsin
JC-Wisconsin
USER since 4/1/05
Most likely smallmouth numbers have remained fairly stable, but walleye numbers have decreased. There is an extensive study available on the web that shows interactions between smallmouth, largemouth, walleye, northern, and muskie. Smallmouth bass showed little to no negative interaction with walleye. I fish in Canada, and you can catch smallmouth all day long in lakes that are considered great walleye lakes. You seldom, if ever, find a good naturally reproducing walleye lake with good numbers of LM bass. The study found that LM bass prey extensively on walleye fry. The more walleye fry you stock, the more LM bass utilize the fry and actually have increased reproduction. Smallmouths don't seem to have any effect on walleye reproduction. It most likely is a coincidence on Chip - but you never know 100%. Have LM bass numbers increased in the last 20 years on the Chip? I don't fish it enough to know, but I have heard the LM bass numbers have increased markedly.

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4/23/12 @ 4:31 PM
emceemc
emceemc
USER since 9/18/01
JC, I don't know about that. What my experience tells me is that rock and weed edge areas that used to produce walleye now produce smallmouth. I was on the Chippewa regularly once a year from 1993 to 2011 and will go again this summer.

The spots where a smallmouth was a rarity went to a 50-50 mix for a few years and have now gone to where the walleye is rare.

My senses could be a bit off, because I know that over the years my rigs and presentations have changed more toward the smallmouth as I learned what they wanted.

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4/23/12 @ 6:26 AM
LuckyL1
LuckyL1
USER since 6/15/11
The problem I have with fishing northern Wi is the gas prices. They have the most expensive gas in the state! Then if you do find walleye and get your 2 fish you have to find another lake causing you to use more gas. Its feels like the Indians are just slapping you in the face with there arrogance in the 2 bag limit. I wasn't happy with the 3 bag limit but I put up with it. I am retired and on a limited budget so I can't do this anymore. I have quit fishing for walleye up north and just fish for pan fish now.

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4/23/12 @ 3:54 AM
JC-Wisconsin
JC-Wisconsin
USER since 4/1/05
Smallmouth won't squeeze walleyes out. SM Bass and walleye get along well, and is why many of the best walleye lakes are also great smallmouth lakes. In Canada, you can catch limits of walleyes and smallmouths in the same lake. Largemouth bass are likely more to blame.

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4/21/12 @ 11:46 AM
emceemc
emceemc
USER since 9/18/01
Namakagon impressed me, I didn't know a thing about the lake but walleye were in all the places they should be. I found them in deep holes, along reed lines, and sandy flats near weed beds. It just seemed easy to find them. I thought size was good too.

Chippewa really has to come off the list. Smallmouth have been squeezing them out for 15 years now. I think the process is about complete. Walleye are getting to be a surprise.

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4/19/12 @ 3:12 PM
JC-Wisconsin
JC-Wisconsin
USER since 4/1/05
"LCO, Grindstone, Chippewa Flowage, Lake Namakagon, Big Siss, all great lakes. "

I would remove Big Siss off the list. Used to be OK, but now overrun with bass like many of the area lakes. The population is in severe decline.

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4/18/12 @ 8:04 PM
30''walters
30''walters
USER since 1/22/12
Little Arb when the timing is right

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