Start an 'Outdoor Journal' now!

By Brock Annrose - December 1, 2002
It is nearing ice fishing season, a certain excitement fills the air – this excitement enters my thoughts, clogging my mind of it's daily routine, hindering my level of functionality, umm, shall we say it's now similar to… "Yes teacher!?! No, I wasn't daydreaming."

I'm sure most fishermen recognize the 'fever'. It has a profound effect upon most all of us. During this time, I daydream of past outings -- some memorable and some not so. Some of the fondest are of my dad, although he has passed away a few years back, I still like to recall fishing with him. What would help my fading memory any better than a journal could? I only wish I had started writing years and years ago so I could recall every momentous part.

The first journal I ever started was when I built a new ice-fishing house. Ice shack, ice hut, call it what you will in your neck of the woods. Anyway, I thought it would be a good idea to record when the fish were biting -- according to the time of day, barometric pressure, type of bait or lure used, and what size they were. The journal, just a small notebook, was left at the shack on the table. A host of other fishermen had a key to the shack and would use it from time to time.

"I wish my dad had had a journal that I could now read. I wish my grandpa and his grandpa would have all had journals. What great reading this would be indeed..."
Needless to say, other items were added to the journal, not always pertaining to fishing. What great reading this has turned out to be!

It was a good idea then and appears to be a better idea now, ten years later. As I read it, I can't help but smile about incidents, that probably would be long forgotten had it not been for this journal.

I wish my dad had had a journal that I could now read. I wish my grandpa and his grandpa would have all had journals. What great reading this would be indeed, for my children, and myself and to be passed down through the generations -- almost as valuable and priceless as grandpa's old gun that has been passed down.

An outdoor journal is a record of experiences, ideas, or reflections -- regularly updated. That is one of the definitions for it, another is diary. I prefer to use the latter because 'diary' sounds more like something my sister guarded with her life.

The exercise of journaling is a good way to compress your personal mannerism and outdoor characteristics into quick and easy viewing. From time to time, I like to re-read the journal entries, ponder and reflect upon the times when I wrote them.

Many people believe that they cannot write adequately. Everyone can write! Maybe poorly at first but for some reason, the more you write the better you get at it, your writing skills improve with every journal entry. Even if you enter just one sentence per entry, only once a week, it's a start – soon the words will flow more generously and freely. And believe me, somewhere, someone, someday will want to read it.

The Hermit Writer

Author Brock Annrose
Brock Annrose
Brock, alias The Hermit Writer, is an avid outdoor enthusiast, writer and photographer from Northeastern Wisconsin. Website: http://www.geocities.com/brock_freelancer/index.html.