Lake Redstone, Sauk County

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10/17/17 @ 11:52 AM
prop-buster
prop-buster
USER since 6/14/05

pretty much falls on deaf ears, is an irritant tho when someone jumps on his soap box and starts banging his drum...listen up I am going to tell YOU what to do, (OMG, again?) not sure which Redstone you were fishing 20-25 years ago, but yes there were a lot of crappies, most of which were 9" and if you held up to a light you could see right through them. 5 years ago crappies were phenomenal on Redstone...they go in 10 year cycles, it will come back to that again. Not sure if anyone really noticed but the lake didn't get hit very hard the past two winters because of the lack of ice. Walleyes are still there but tough to find them in summer when you are almost getting run over by boats every minute...seems odd that nobody brings up the "shad" explosion hurting the fishery. I mean clouds of shad on electronics...

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10/17/17 @ 8:32 AM
Billy
Billy
USER since 6/15/01
Agreed Redstone does not need White bass/Stripers. There can be at times decent walleye fishing in the lake and with that I have caught and release some dandy walleyes 24" or over many times. One of the least appreciated species in the lake is the large channel cats I run across from time to time which can be a great extended fight. Good point on the Brown and Green back Muskies I have seen both over the years and when I catch a pike it is usually in 35" plus range. I'd say while the lake can be tough fishing at times there is no need to add species to it. What is there now is thriving and doing well. With that a walleye stocking program wouldn't hurt at all. 

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10/17/17 @ 7:52 AM
MuskyBP
MuskyBP
USER since 7/2/08

Just want to say Redstone has no need for White / Stripper Bass

The lake has a very healthy population of Pan fish, LMB, SMB and Musky.

I correspond with the DNR person that manages the lake and once suggested that they start stocking Northern in the lake and was told they have no plans for this or introducing any other fish type into Redstone.

Redstone does have Northern in it but very few. Only caught one (1) in the 6 years fishing Musky in the lake.

I know the Redstone Fish Club s pushing hard for Walleye to be stock and are actually trying to raise money for this. 

There are two types of Musky in Redstone.  I call them Green Backs and Brown Backs.

If you hook into a brown back hold on for a fight because its a 40s plus fish for sure. 

You will know what I mean by brown back if one follows you up because in the Redstone dirty water it almost glows brown.

Tight Lines




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10/17/17 @ 7:01 AM
Don Varese
Don Varese
MEMBER since 6/20/01

When do they usually pull the piers at the landings on Redstone

Edited on 10/17/17 7:01 AM
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10/17/17 @ 3:07 AM
Master_Piker
Master_Piker
USER since 12/7/05

I am 100% against white bass being introduced into Redstone. The lake is not big enough to support them and there are already enough gamefish in the system. White bass are voracious feeders and are an aggressive, schooling species, which makes them fun to catch, but on a lake the size of Redstone, they would eat it out of house and home in a matter of a few years. Also, they compete directly with walleyes for food. You think the walleye fishing sucks in Redstone now? Try throwing a couple million white bass in there...

I am not sure they would even do all that well to be honest. White bass do best in flowages with moving water and tributary streams for spawning. Redstone has two TINY inlets that probably wouldn't support large populations of white bass. If you like eating white bass, good for you. They are a good eating fish. Most people look at them as a nuisance and would rather keep crappie, perch or bluegill rather than white bass.

If you think that adding white bass to this fishery is going to keep anglers from targeting the species already present, I think you are sadly mistaken (this is my opinion). Redstone is a great fishery that does receive a LOT of pressure. It is one of the very few lakes in Sauk County that you can launch a boat over 14' in length and isn't Slow-No-Wake. Due to the pressure it receives, one must be able to adapt strategies and presentations accordingly. Given the time of year, water temperature and depth at which it was conducted, I'm not sure what kind of representative sample will be obtained by the electrofishing survey that was conducted last week. It should be a good indication of the health of some of the gamefish populations in the lake, but I was fishing last Thursday and did quite well on crappies, but I was fishing in 13-17 FOW along part of the old creek channel. I'm not sure how many of those nice crappies would be in 4-6 FOW feeding at night while they were shocking.

This is getting long enough, so I will cut it off here. I think if white bass were a good fit for Redstone, they would already be in there. It is a good fishery, just not always one you can throw out a crappie minnow under a bobber and catch 12" crappies. And don't kid yourself, there is a fantastic forage base in the lake that will support PLENTY of crappies. Proof of this is how hard Redstone gets fished, how many people keep limits of fish, and how many nice panfish are still in the lake. Tight lines everyone!

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10/16/17 @ 5:20 PM
david123
david123
USER since 8/1/16

To be honest, I don't know much about stripers (or strippers, for that matter).  Not sure if I've ever caught one.

I'll definitely agree with you on the catch and release.  I think Redstone is too small of a lake to support that kind of fishing pressure with people keeping a lot of fish.

I heard they were doing another electro survey right around now.  Maybe the results of that will change stocking or regulations if they find the numbers are way down from the last survey.

Edited on 10/16/17 5:23 PM
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10/16/17 @ 4:47 PM
Dr. Spoon
Dr. Spoon
USER since 4/27/04
I've been fishing Redstone for close to 20 years and the biggest threat to this fishery is, and has always been, the anglers themselves.  Unfortunately, catch and release is not a common practice on this lake.  In fact, other than musky and bass, it is a non existent practice.  Walleye fishing has taken a beating the past 15 years since the hard core stocking of the early 2000s.  Back in 2000-2005ish, it was not uncommon to catch 25-30 walleye in a day, anywhere between 12-23 inches.  This aggressive stocking ended around 2005 and due to anglers not practicing catch and release(which is their right), the walleye population has taken a beating.  So much in fact, that the DNR will be reinstating this aggressive walleye stocking next year, which should help.  I have found this to be true with the crappie population as well, which is still solid, but nowhere near what it was 15-20 years ago for numbers and size.    

Musky and bass are aplenty because these are not fish that are targeted for a meal.  So, I don't see how stripers would be a detriment to the fishery.  Perhaps it would affect the panfish, but the real problem is the anglers who abuse the keeper policy, keeping 25 crappie every day for several days.  This is a commonplace most notably in the winter when thousands of crappies are kept.  And other than a few anglers here and there, every legal walleye is kept on Redstone.  A fishery of this size cannot withstand that type of "selective harvest."

Stripers are actually a preferred fish for a meal, so I would argue that this would also please these anglers who find it necessary to keep every legal fish they catch.  

Additionally, I have fished lakes, much smaller than Redstone, that have a healthy population of stripers and it has not affected the other species existence at all.   They can all coexist as long as the DNR monitors it correctly and the anglers follow the regulations of possession limits. 

I've stepped up on my soapbox numerous times on this site, trying to promote catch and release, but it has fallen on either deaf or ignorant ears.  I think stocking stripers is a win/win.  More game fish for those of us who just enjoy the thrill of the catch, but release everything and for those who like to fish and keep them for a meal. 

I have more thoughts, but I've already been long winded.     

 

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10/16/17 @ 2:29 PM
david123
david123
USER since 8/1/16

I recently bought a house on the lake and have been fishing it only for the past year or so.  It seems like an odd fishery to me.  From what I've seen on the electronics and from what I've caught, Redstone seems to have a healthy forage base, and a ton of Crappies that move around.  There are some carp, bass, walleye, northern, perch, bluegil, muskie, and catfish, but I haven't found any consistent patterns to them.  It looks almost random where I've caught them.  Also looks like the lake gets a lot of fishing pressure, and a lot of fish are taken out.  I'd love to see the results of the latest survey they are doing to see what kind of numbers and sizes they get.

I agree, introducing a new predator is probably a bad idea.

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10/16/17 @ 12:57 PM
david123
david123
USER since 8/1/16

Not sure if it is a silo.  I saw something circular (could be a silo) with what looked to be the remains of a foundation around it.  I was guessing an old farm.  Saw it on my sidefinder.  I didn't mark any fish around it, but fished it for a while anyway and didn't catch anything.  I have it stored on my depthfinder, but my boat is already in storage.  All I can remember it was in the main body of the lake due south of the big new house where the lake forks left and right.  Sorry, probably not much help.

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10/16/17 @ 12:30 PM
bass423
bass423
MEMBER since 3/1/12

Please don't they will take over an already fragile ecosystem.  This lake used to be well managed and had a good species diversity and population structure, now not so much.  Adding a very aggressive sight feeder to the mix will be impact the remaining species negatively.

My $0.02.

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Displaying 11 to 20 of 3,222 Posts