Lake Redstone, Sauk County

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10/19/17 @ 7:06 PM
smalliebuster
smalliebuster
USER since 8/23/12

Dr. Spoon,

There are striped bass and white bass and a hybrid (cross striped/white) aka "wiper", only the white bass can survive in this climate, the only lake stocked was lake columbia with wipers because it was a warm water fishery year round. As for crappie,  it is common knowledge that they have cycle years, as do most fish, but there's seems to be a little bit more dramatic,  as for lack of walleye in redstone, it can be contributed to many reasons, higher density of predator fish, natural die off, die off from excess run off from surrounding farms causing higher algae blooms, or simply the ones left are more finicky and harder to catch, I have seen more fish populations destroyed by lake associations draining lakes to get rid pesky weeds than I have from fisherman over fishing them, please get more of your facts straight before you start blaming fellow fisherman, and so you know, I am an avid fisherman and I don't eat fish, so no, I'm not one of the over baggers.

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10/18/17 @ 11:44 AM
Fish N Phil
Fish N Phil
USER since 6/15/01

Firs I think we need to understand if he is actually talking about a true Stripe Bass or a white bass.  Stripe Bass are non native and would never be stocked so that is off the table.  Secondly to my knowledge Whitebass have never been stocked in any body of water.  They are not considered a game fish so are typically not a hatchery rasied fish.  So to even have this considered or even thought of as an option is a long shot. 

As far as walleye go if they are stocked in a body of water with little to no natural reproduction it is eseentially a put and take fishery.  As others have said stockign walleye is a very expensive endeavor.  So essentially they were put in for another fish to catch and take home for the dinner table.  They were never expected to establish a self sustaining population.  If they wanted that lots of habitat work would need to be done to even have a chance at that.

Just my thoughts.  

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10/18/17 @ 10:40 AM
prop-buster
prop-buster
USER since 6/14/05

I will leave it with M_P said....there are a lot of factors in the success or lack of in a fishery...

I live 15 minutes away Spoon...have fished all the area lakes for years, everybody practices catch and release at some point...there are just days where I sure don't feel like cleaning 25/5/1 or whatever....the important question is have I ever left that lake/or in possession of over my limit...not a chance, and despite what other people think they see or assume, not many do...

as far as being defensive (speaking totally for myself) don't try and tell me what to do/what I should be doing/and feel guilty about keeping a limit of fish, have been pretty grouchy about that for 65 years and there doesn't seem to be a change for that philosophy in the near future 

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10/18/17 @ 8:32 AM
david123
david123
USER since 8/1/16

Can't we all just get along? 

I don't think we need to resort to a Wisconsin vs. Illinois battle.  I'm sure we are all supporting the local economy up there through our fishing licenses, taxes, shopping, dinning...

I'd much rather have a friendly discussion on the merits of introducing new species or catch and release.  Ultimately it's up to the DNR anyway, and they probably know better than us. 

It sounds like we all care about making it a better fishery, it's just the approaches are different.

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10/17/17 @ 11:27 PM
Master_Piker
Master_Piker
USER since 12/7/05

Dr. Spoon,

Want to know one reason the walleye population in Redstone is not good? Redstone is not a walleye lake. Without aggressive stocking (which hasn't happened for a few years), there would be NO walleye in the lake. Why? Walleyes need moving water with gravel/sand bottom to reproduce. Both inlets to Redstone are muck bottom coming from farmland to the north of the lake. 

You keep going back to catch and release being the reason walleye numbers are low, which may be part of the problem. The REAL problem is there is no natural reproduction to replace the ones kept. Stocking walleyes is not cheap. Through the efforts of local clubs and the lake association, one should be grateful to be able to fish for walleye in Redstone at all.

If you know of a lake in Illinois that has great populations of white bass, go fish for them there! Or drive 25 minutes to Castle Rock or the Dells and fish the Wisconsin River for walleye and white bass.

Redstone is a great fishery. Yes, it gets a lot of pressure, both fishing and pleasure boating, which can affect fishing and force anglers to adapt and adjust presentations. It can be a difficult lake to fish, especially on weekends when the out of staters are up and there is a lot of boat traffic. In any case, white bass are not the answer.

Strict catch and release can be a bad thing as well. Carrying capacity is a real thing. A lake can only support a given tonnage of fish. If you catch and release everything, you can end up with stunted growth. I do not agree with overharvest, but if I have the,choice, I'd rather catch three 19" walleyes that are 5# each than catch 15 walleyes that are 13" and weigh 1# each, even if I have to fish harder for the 5# walleyes. Something to think about.

Edited on 10/17/17 11:31 PM
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10/17/17 @ 11:08 PM
CrystalLakeMonster
CrystalLakeMonster
USER since 11/22/10

I've never heard of a lake where they stock strippers.

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10/17/17 @ 10:50 PM
Dr. Spoon
Dr. Spoon
USER since 4/27/04

I actually own a home on Redstone, which is why I am invested in the quality of the fishing and I think gives me a right to voice an opinion.  Everything I suggest is for the good of the lake and the future of fishing.  

If the DNR were to give me legit reasons for not stocking stripers, I would be fine with that.  I threw it out there as a suggestion.  

Do either of you, St. Croix/Prop Buster live on Redstone?  Do either of you ever practice catch and release?   Looking through prior threads, I'm guessing you don't due to how defensive you both are.  

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10/17/17 @ 4:17 PM
prop-buster
prop-buster
USER since 6/14/05

I was sort of trying to be nice St.Croix...but I think if Dr. Spoon found a lake in IL. that matched his philosophy and like minded people he would go there instead of hurting my ears banging that drum.

the crappie meeting was held two years ago, you must have missed the memo...and seriously if you didn't know about the 10 year crappie cycle (every 5 year old child around here knows about it) then the rest of the stuff you spew is banging your chest and telling other people to listen up. Lake owners are killing weeds, wave runner boats are rolling 4 footers against the shores all day long in summer..their right to do so, killing habitat and you want ME to conform to your thinking LMAO bet that 150 acre lake has a lot of water skiers on it aye?

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10/17/17 @ 3:25 PM
ST.CROIX
ST.CROIX
USER since 1/28/03

Not sure IL residents should be telling us what we need to stock....

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10/17/17 @ 2:29 PM
Dr. Spoon
Dr. Spoon
USER since 4/27/04

I understand the concerns of introducing a new species to the lake, though I would completely disagree that Redstone can not handle it.  Just last week, I fished Lake Thunderbird towards LaSalle Peru area in Illinois.  This lake is about 150 acres(1/4 of the size of Redstone) and it has all the same species as Redstone, including Stripers and an incredible population of shad, and all species are flourishing.  The main reason - it's a semi-private lake and the majority of fish are released.  But, again, I understand others concerns about introducing a new species.  They are valid concerns, I just disagree.

Prop-Buster, I wasn't aware that the crappie flourished every 10 years.   Do the crappie have a meeting amongst themselves to decided that every 10 years was a nice, round number?   In other words, that statement is preposterous.  Overall, the crappie population and quality has decreased in the near 20 years I have fished Redstone.  Do we occasionally have a good day catching crappie?  Yes.  But nowhere near the factory it was a decade or so ago.   

One more note on catch and release.  This isn't rocket science.  If more people practiced catch and release, there would be more fish in the lake for all to catch.  If the walleye population was thriving, then why is there an aggressive walleye stocking approach being incorporated starting next year?   The first of such an aggressive approach in over 12 years?  This is necessary because, as I stated before, 90% of the walleye caught on Redstone are kept.  A lake of this size can not withstand that type of harvesting. 

Again, with everything we know about catch and release these days, and its impact on any body of water(large or small), it's disappointing and sad that more don't practice it on a regular basis.   

-Dr. Spoon 

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