Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County

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10/17/17 @ 4:46 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (5%)
Waning Crescent

Excerpts from the October 16, 2017 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

The forecast for this week (at least until the weekend) shows near-perfect fall weather for just about any outdoor activity. Cool nights and highs in the mid to upper 60s is about as good as it gets! Take advantage now – or play “woulda, coulda, shoulda” in what will probably be the too-near future.  

“Our autumn weather continues to be rather mild,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “with daytime temperature ranging from the mid 50s to the lower 60s. Leaf colors are now at or nearing peak, hunters are taking to the woods for grouse, archery deer, and waterfowl, and anglers are on the water searching for trophy muskies... Most fishing action is for musky and this is the time to float suckers while casting. In the past couple of weeks, the majority of muskies have come on live bait. Large bucktails, swim baits, gliders, and deep running crankbaits also work. If you float a sucker while casting, make sure to retrieve the lure past the sucker. You may have a follow – and many anglers miss follows by not doing a figure eight at the boat... Walleye action is best in late evening into night for anglers fishing along shallow weeds and rock bars as walleyes come in to feed. Small crankbaits, tube jigs, and jigs and minnows are producing the most success. However, we have several reports of musky anglers trolling musky lures catching walleyes and largemouth bass... Northern pike are still active in and around the weeds, once again proven by musky anglers. Anglers are catching most of the pike on small to mid-size bucktails and spinnerbaits, but northern pike will hit almost anything that moves or flashes... You will find largemouth bass on deeper weeds and smallmouth on rock and gravel areas. The same baits work for both species... Panfish fishing action slowed, but anglers report success fishing deeper weeds (8-12 feet) for crappies and bluegills. Sometimes fish are suspending and other times they are close to the bottom. Adjust baits accordingly to cover the entire water column. Schooled fish move around and good electronics help locate them. Early afternoon is best. Use crappie minnows and small fatheads under slip bobbers, though vertical jigging small tube jigs produce good success.”  

Erik at Hayward Bait says water temperatures are cooling to the mid 50s as nightly lows produce good morning frosts... “Musky anglers are out and the fall bite is in full swing. Anglers looking for big muskies report success fishing musky suckers off the back of the boat, as well as while casting gliders, crankbaits, jerkbaits, and rubber baits such as Medusas and Bull Dawgs... “Walleye fishing is holding strong with aggressive, jigging style baits such as Rippin' Raps, Jigging Raps, and Rattle Traps. For the tough afternoon bite, just keep it simple. A jig head tipped with a walleye sucker or fathead minnow is highly effective... Bass anglers continue to hit the water and report some success fishing tubes and crankbaits, with even an occasional topwater bite... Panfish action is progressively picking up this fall. Anglers report the most success fishing various small paddle-tail, shad, tube, and plastics near cribs and in deep weeds. Tipping your favorite color jig with a crappie minnow and fishing it with/without a bobber is also always a productive." 

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses walleye stocking success in the Hayward area... “Fish stocking can be a useful tool for fisheries biologists to create fisheries where a fishery did not previously exist (e.g. stocked trout ponds), reestablish populations, or to supplement existing populations... In the Hayward area, most of the stocking consists of muskellunge and walleye. Walleye stocking has become increasingly common, as natural recruitment has sputtered in many local lakes. There are about two dozen lakes in the Hayward area stocked with extended growth walleye... Evaluations of the stocking success in those lakes show that survival varies considerably, depending on the lake. The survival of stocked walleye appears to be highest in Big Chetac, Chippewa Flowage, Teal (and to a lesser extent Lost Land), and some of the smaller lakes in the Winter area. One commonality between all these lakes experiencing good stocking survival is that they have relatively dark water. In addition, all of these lakes have a good forage base... As we continue to stock walleyes, we will expand our understanding of where stocking works best, how many fish to stock in a given lake, and what we can do to improve stocking survival... It should be noted the preferred outcome is that the walleye return to reproducing naturally.”  

FISHING REPORT  

Musky:   Musky action is good and getting better as fall temperatures encourage a pre-winter feeding binge. Work on/edges of deep weeds, breaks, points, bars, and wherever you find concentrations of panfish. The most productive baits include suckers, large bucktails, Bull Dawgs and similar rubber baits, tubes, jerkbaits, stickbaits, gliders, and crankbaits, with trolling many of these baits working as well.  

Walleye:  Walleye reports range from fair to very good, with lake, time, conditions, offerings, and angler all factors in success (or lack thereof). Late afternoon into dark is best, concentrating on shallow weeds, points, bars, and rock. Jigs with walleye suckers or fatheads work best, but crankbaits, plastics, and tube jigs are also catching fish.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike are on the feed around weeds in varied depths and not far from wherever you find concentrations of panfish. Try northern suckers and small to medium bucktails, spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, swim baits, and soft plastics. If catching trophy pike is your goal, offer bigger baits in deeper water.  

Largemouth Bass:  Largemouth action can be very, very good in the fall if you can locate the fish and make correct presentations. Look for fish around deep weeds, downed trees, brush, and cribs, and tempt them with live bait, plastics, spinners, and spinnerbaits.  

Smallmouth Bass:  Smallmouth action remains fair to good on rock, gravel, and cribs at various depths. Use sucker minnows, crawlers, tubes, crankbaits, plastics, drop-shot rigs, and topwaters. 

Crappie:  Crappie action is very good once you locate and follow them. Fish are schooling and suspending at various depths around weeds, cribs, and near bottom. Best baits include small jigs tipped with crappie minnows, fatheads, tubes, plastics, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, and Gulp! baits fished with or without bobbers.  

Bluegill:  Bluegill fishing is good for bigger fish around mid-depth to deeper weeds, brush, and cribs. Use waxies, worms, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small jigs, teardrops, and plain hooks, with or without slip bobbers.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  


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10/13/17 @ 9:45 AM
The Muskie Kid
The Muskie Kid
USER since 12/11/02

Q:  Any current reports for Lake Namakagon, Cable? How's it looking for next week? 

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10/12/17 @ 7:54 PM
Ranger77
Ranger77
USER since 10/22/14

Anybody know if the clear lakes turned over yet? 

Thanks

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10/10/17 @ 3:49 PM
FISHING REPORT
Big Chip Guide Service
Tim Czub
USER since 9/8/03

MOON PHASE (70%)
Waning Gibbous

Fishing on the Chippewa Flowage remains fairly decent with Crappies making up most of the catch. Finding fish in the usual fall spots but seemed to be scattered. Cribs are still holding fish, but, that will change when the water cools more. Current temps ranged 60 - 62 degrees. Once we break into the 50's, things will pop!

The Walleye's are still running on that "just under" size. The bigger fish are still ellusive with all the bait fish for them to feed on, makes it a bit tough, though, trolling raps and cranks seemed to produce keeper sized fish.

The Musky bite has been good for the most part. With plenty of fish being caught traditionaly casting and as well trolling big baits. The live bait bite should pick up as well, once they go on their cold water feeding spree.

The lake level is at around 2 feet down and dropping. The partners want to be at the 5 ft below pool, around Nov. 15th. Then another 3 foot drop by March.

I do have this Sunday morning available if someones interested in catching fish and the colors, before they're all gone for another year.

TC

Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
(715) 820-1823
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10/10/17 @ 2:59 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (70%)
Waning Gibbous

Excerpts from the October 9, 2017 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Clear, cool (frost!), and mostly dry weather appears to be in store for the Hayward area this week. The forecasts make only slight mention of rain chances for late in the week and weekend. Get out now and enjoy these mostly mild temperatures while they exist – it will not last forever!

“Weather wise, it has certainly been a crazy couple of weeks!” says Pat at Happy Hooker...  Musky fishing is good on the weed edges with bucktails, Bull Dawgs, topwaters, trolled crankbaits, and suckers on quick-strike rigs. Sucker action gets better as the water cools... Walleye anglers should concentrate on deep weed edges, rocks, and breaklines. Minnows and crawlers on jigs, Lindy Rigs, live bait rigs, and spinners will entice the fish... Northern pike anglers report good action on shallow to mid-depth weeds with northern suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, and spoons tipped with Twister Tails. Smallmouth fishing is good on hard bottom areas in varied depths, with best success on plastics, crankbaits, and live bait... Crappies are in/near shallow and deep weeds and other structure. Some are schooling and some are suspending over deeper water. Try small jigs with plastics or minnows on slip bobbers, drifting slowly over deep water. Bigger bluegills around deeper weeds are taking worms and waxies under slip bobbers. For perch, fish deeper weeds with minnows and leaf worms under slip bobbers.”  

Erik at Hayward Bait says lakes are high for this time of year, with Chippewa Flowage the exception due to the winter drawdown, and water temperatures are dropping slowly...  "Musky anglers report good catches on steep breaks along points and bars with larger jerkbaits, crankbaits, plastics such as Bull Dawgs, and tubes. Suckers on quickset rigs are working and become more effective as fall progresses... Walleye fishing remains tough. Try 20-40 feet on clear lakes and slightly shallower on dark water. Use jigs/minnows on slip bobbers along deeper bars and points and look for baitfish... Northern pike are active on deep weedlines and swimbaits and slow-rolling spinnerbaits should work. Smallmouth fishing is decent with large suckers, tubes, drop-shot rigs, and jerkbaits on deep rocks and cribs... Crappie fishing is solid in deeper winter basins for anglers using small plastics or minnows on tungsten jigs.”  

Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky action is solid. "Vexers are the number one casting bait, with Headbangers, Warlocks, and Suicks strong options. Mattlocks remain the top trolling bait, though 10-inch Jakes are producing some nice fish. Muskies follow the food supply in fall when bulking up for winter, so find the baitfish – and schooling crappies are a great place to start... Walleyes are active, but larger ones seem dormant and waiting to get more aggressive. Minnows and crawlers are best, though some larger swimbaits and Flicker Shads are producing results... Northern pike fishing remains strong in the weeds on suckers and spinnerbaits. Bass are quiet on the Flowage, but Round Lake bass are very active in the cribs on 3- to 4-inch suckers... Crappies are schooling, but activity slowed, perhaps due to recent weather fronts. Crappie minnows are the bait of choice, but Crappie Scrubs and tube jigs, particularly yellow, green, and black, are getting interest.”  

FISHING REPORT  

Musky: Musky fishing is good to very good and only getting better with the cooling water temperatures. During this past weekend’s Hayward Muskies Inc. fall tournament, 66 of 440 anglers registered 80 muskies, close to a 20-percent success rate that is almost double normal musky tournament expectations. The fish are hitting! Target deep weed edges, steep breaks, points, bars, and panfish concentrations. Best baits include bucktails, large plastics such as Bull Dawgs, tubes, crankbaits, jerkbaits, stickbaits, and live suckers. Trolling is also producing good catches.  

Walleye:  Walleye are scattered and the bite is inconsistent (surprise!), with mornings and evening still providing the best odds. Look for fish on/along deep bars, points, breaks, rocks, and weed edges. Fish are deeper on clear the lakes. Anglers who are catching fish use minnows and crawlers on slip bobbers, spinners, and Lindy Rigs, as well as swimbaits, stickbaits, and crankbaits.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike action is good to very good in and around weeds, both shallow and deep, and panfish concentrations. Spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, swimbaits, soft plastics, and northern suckers can all grab the attention of pike. Use bigger baits in deeper water for trophy pike.  

Largemouth Bass:  Largemouth activity is slowing and so is anglers’ fishing interest. However, you can find largemouth around various types of deeper structure such as weeds, brush, and downed trees. Use spinners, spinnerbaits, plastics, and live bait.  

Smallmouth Bass:  Smallmouth action is fair to good on mid-depth to deep rocks and cribs. Anglers report success on sucker minnows, crawlers, tubes, crankbaits, jerkbaits, plastics, and drop-shot rigs.  

Crappie:  Crappie fishing is good to very good, with fish schooling and/or suspending in various depths from shallow to deep. Top producing baits include jigs and crappie minnows, small plastics, tube jigs, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, Crappie Scrubs, and Gulp! baits. 

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10/6/17 @ 9:33 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (99%)
Waning Gibbous

Excerpts from the October 2, 2017 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

The forecast indicates a wet start to the week, but with sunshine and 60-degree temperatures Wednesday. Showers are possible Friday and Saturday, but with continued temperatures in the 60s. This is not a bad forecast for October in the North Woods! Get out and enjoy it – fall is a far too short season!  

“Trees along the shorelines are showing fall colors,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “and falling water temperatures usually means an increase in fishing success... Musky fishing was surprisingly good during the warmer weather last week and versatile anglers boated some nice fish on bucktails, topwaters, suckers, and trolling crankbaits in deeper water. The key is a flexible approach... Some walleyes are in their fall areas, but fish remain somewhat scattered and not in groups chasing baitfish. The good minnow bite slowed and fish are still biting on crawlers fished behind spinner rigs, live bait rigs, and Lindy Rigs. If you use minnows or minnow imitations, go smaller to get more fish. Look for steep breaks and deep structure... Some anglers are spending time fishing for smallmouth bass and northern pike. They seem to have their best luck fishing small soft plastics in shallow water. With the cooler forecast this week, we will see how it affects the fishing... Crappies are still holding near shore, off shallow green vegetation that is still producing a good amount of oxygen. Some fish are out towards deep structure and a few are suspending. As the water cools, they will move deeper and suspend over main lake basins in big schools. They are fun to target with small jigs and plastics or jigs and minnows. Using the wind, slowly drift over deep mud to get bites. Stagger slip bobber depths to find the school and active biters.”  

Mike at Jenk’s says musky action is heating up on the Chippewa Flowage, with anglers using a variety of methods... “More anglers are starting to use suckers, but casting and trolling are still effective, and there is a lot of action on shallow bars and cover. Bucktails and surface baits are still effective, and trolling Mattlocks and 10-inch Jakes – in that order – are the baits of choice. Hit areas with schooling crappies and troll through the school or drop down a sucker...  Walleyes turned on again, though big fish remain elusive. During the day, troll bottom bouncers or cast #7 Jigging Raps on mud flats in 20-25 feet. In the evening, work bar edges with minnows or crawlers... Northern pike action is hot on spinnerbaits in the weeds, though fish size varies. The only steady bass action is with 3- to 4-inch suckers in the cribs on Round Lake... Crappies are still schooling in Moores Bay and Blueberry Flats and biting on a variety of baits, including crappie minnows, Gulp! Minnows, Mini-Mites, and Crappie Scrubs. Chartreuse, whites, and pinks are the hot colors.”  

FISHING REPORT  

Musky:   Musky fishing is good and getting better with the weather change. Target bars, breaklines, humps, weeds, and other cover from shallow to deep, as well as wherever you find panfish concentrations. Baits of choice include suckers, bucktails, trolled crank and stick baits, and topwaters.  

Walleye:  Walleyes are scattered, but fishing is fair to good, with early morning and evening offering the best success. During the day, fish various depths and habitats, from deeper weeds, breaks, structure, and mud flats out to 30 feet. In early morning and evening into dark, work weed bed and bar edges. Top baits include minnows and crawlers on jigs, Lindy Rigs, bottom bouncers, and spinner rigs, Jigging Raps, and trolled crankbaits.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike action remains good in/around shallow to mid-depth weeds and near panfish concentrations. Use spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, plastics, and northern suckers under bobbers.  

Bass:  Largemouth bass fishing can be a challenge this time of year as the fish move deeper, but find them on the right day and you can enjoy outstanding action. Work deeper green weeds with spinnerbaits, plastics, twitch bait, and even some shallow topwaters on warmer, sunny days. Look for smallmouth on deeper hard bottoms, rocks, cribs, and humps, as well as near deeper cover in flowages and rivers. Best baits include sucker minnows, crawlers, crankbaits, and drop-shot rigs  

Crappie:  Crappie fishing is fair to very good when you locate them. Find fish schooling, near shallow weeds, on deeper structure, and suspending over deeper water. Crappie minnows, small plastics, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, Crappie Scrubs, and Gulp! Minnows under slip bobbers are all working.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  


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10/5/17 @ 6:20 PM
Jim Stroede
Jim Stroede Guide Service
USER since 1/8/15

Bryan, the Spider Lake Chain is nearby and a real nice muskie choice.

Edited on 10/5/17 6:21 PM
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10/3/17 @ 6:46 PM
Chitown fishing bear
Chitown fishing bear
USER since 12/20/14

ill be staying at the golden rule how the musky action  been their. last i herd not good that be disapointing but looking for a good spot for muskie got a tip on any of the lakes near bye would appriciate it driving from rockford ill long way want to get sum nice muskie Last time i stayed at golden rule fished tigercat omg was awesome just wanna now were to hit up coming up on the 16th id appriciate it thanks names bryan 

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9/27/17 @ 11:24 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE
First Quarter

Excerpts from the September 25, 2017 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

While Northern Zone waterfowl hunters (season opened Sept. 23) surely welcomed the rain and cooler temperatures to start this week, current forecasts indicate a return to sunshine and mild temperatures Wednesday. After that... we will have to wait and see, but look for lows in the 30s and frost Friday night.  

“Shorter days, dropping temperatures, and dying weeds will move fish to deeper water,” says Pat at Happy Hooker... “Musky action is improving, anglers are catching a few nice sized ones, and every strategy is working. Try working deeper weed edges with bucktails, rubber baits, crankbaits, topwaters, and live bait... Look for walleye on the deepest weed edges and rock piles. Minnows work best, though crawlers will work until water gets colder. Early mornings and late evenings offer the best success... Catch northern pike in and around deeper weeds as shallow weeds start to die. Anglers jigging for walleyes often catch pike. Use smaller spinners, such as #3 and #4 Mepps, and safety-pin style spinnerbaits tipped with Twister Tail grubs are an effective choice... Largemouth are around structure such as downed trees and docks. Spinnerbaits and plastics will work and try casting topwaters in and around pads and reeds. Smallmouth are in and around rocks and jigs tipped with live bait or plastics will work, as will crankbaits...  Crappies are schooling and in deeper weeds. Use slip bobber rigs with small minnows or plastics will work and go pre prepared to move as the fish move around. Bluegills are in shallow. Use slip bobber rigs with waxies or small pieces of worm. Perch are around deeper weeds and slip bobber rigs with minnows or leaf worm pieces should catch a bunch.”  

Erik at Hayward Bait says the weather is unusually warm and beautiful for late September in the North Country and anglers report good success... “Musky fishing is fairly strong and with good bite windows that may consist of simply sunrise/sunset, weather fronts, and wind direction changes. Bucktails and topwaters are the favored choices and suckers out the back of the boat will entice the muskies. Many anglers fishing suckers cast lures around good, shallow weeds. Sucker fishing is a 50-50 bite, so hang one out back ‘just in case.’... Walleyes are scattered. Some anglers find success in the shallows during early morning and late afternoon into evening hours using jigs and minnows and trolling crankbaits. Other anglers report catching fish deep – in 20-35 feet... Bass are quite active, but what they want to eat changes slightly day to day. As the day transitions, fish 6-12 feet using spinnerbaits and plastics, with Texas-rigged and wacky-rigged plastics the most productive. In early morning and last light evening hours, try topwaters... Panfish action is consistent on mid-lake structure that holds good weeds. Fish the edges with jigs and your live bait of choice or Gulp! baits.”  

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses the mix of muskies in the Chippewa Flowage.  

“The Chippewa Flowage is a historic fishery and top destination for musky anglers in Wisconsin, and anglers should see more muskies there for the next few years.

“Surveys indicate a batch of tagged muskies stocked in 2013 show good survival and the fish are now 30-35 inches long. The largest fish in the batch (more than 12 inches at stocking) did exceptionally well and that information led to a goal of stocking more and larger fingerlings in 2016.

“In a cooperative effort between Hayward Muskies Inc. and Governor Thompson Hatchery, DNR staff produced a 2016 class of muskies with an average length more than 13 inches. Initial survival through their first year in the lake looks very promising and their distribution throughout the lake is very encouraging. Many fish moved miles from the stocking location and are finding good habitat to occupy.

“There is even more good news. Natural reproduction of muskies has been strong over the last few years, especially in 2016, and with a mix of stocked and natural born fish in the system, musky anglers should be excited about their future prospects on the Chippewa Flowage.”

FISHING REPORT  

Musky: Musky action is improving and will only get better for big fish as the water (eventually) cools. Concentrate on shallow weeds and/or deep weed edges with bucktails, crankbaits, Bull Dawgs and similar baits, topwaters, and suckers.  

Walleye:  Walleye fishing is fair to good, with fish distributed at various depths throughout the lakes. Early mornings and late evenings still offer the best success. During the day, target deep breaks, rocks, and weed edges out to 30 feet and deeper. Jigs with minnows or crawlers work well, as does trolling crankbaits.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike are in weeds, both shallow and deep, and hitting northern suckers, minnows, spinners, spinnerbaits, and spoons. Fish deeper water with bigger baits to target trophy pike.  

Largemouth Bass:  Largemouth action remains very good – especially for this time of year – with fish holding around lily pads, brush, docks, and fallen trees in 5-14 feet. Fish the deeper water during the day. Bait preferences include spinnerbaits, Texas- and wacky-rigged plastics, live bait, and topwaters in the shallows early and late in the day.  

Smallmouth Bass:  Smallmouth fishing is good to excellent on rocks and other structure at various depths, with some shallow topwater action in early mornings and late evenings. During the day, use jigs with plastics (Texas and wacky rigged) or live bait, spinnerbaits, and crankbaits.  

Crappie:  Crappie action is very good, but you will need to follow the moving fish around the lake. Look for them in mid-lake weeds, weed edges, and other structure containing weeds, as well as suspending over deeper water. The most productive baits include crappie minnows, plastics, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, and Gulp! baits on jigs and/or under slip bobbers.  

Bluegill:  Bluegill fishing is good to very good in shallow to mid-depth weeds and other structure. Best baits include waxies, worms, crawler chunks, small minnows, and Gulp! baits on jigs and/or under slip bobbers.  

Perch:  Perch fishing is good on deeper weeds and structure. Use minnows, leaf worms, and Gulp! baits on jigs and/or under slip bobbers.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  


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9/19/17 @ 2:09 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (0%)
Waning Crescent

Excerpts from the September 18, 2017 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

The forecast for this week is less than encouraging in some respects, with chances for rain and thunderstorms, but with mild to warm temperatures for mid-September. Follow your plan, go prepared, watch the sky – and remember that “sometimes” forecasts miss the mark.

“Fall colors are popping up everywhere,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “and should peak in the next couple of weeks... Musky fishing is sporadic, but with great action in active periods. Fish shallow weeds and along drop-offs with bucktails and surface lures. Try Bull Dawgs, Medusas, and similar lures near baitfish suspending in deep water... Walleye fishing is good for anglers working jigs and crawler halves on the edges of holes and humps in 15-18 feet. In the evening, fish jig/minnow combinations on weed edges in 5-8 feet. On bigger lakes, try just off weeds in 12-15 feet... Northern pike are in weeds, with some in deeper water. Use #4 or #5 Mepps or spoons tipped with Twister Tails... Largemouth are in shallow weeds, rocks, under docks, and in deep water, with no reliable pattern. Smallmouth are in deeper water, hitting crankbaits, crawlers, and minnows... Crappie action is best on minnows, small tube jigs, Tattle-Tails, and Mini-Mites in 12-18 feet. Bluegills are a little deeper in weeds and worms always work.”  

Erik at Hayward Bait says outstanding weather stirred anglers to get out and chase their favorite species... “Musky fishing is picking up and some anglers are starting to run musky suckers off the back of their boat while casting shorelines and mid-lake structure with bucktails and topwaters. During mid-day, troll or cast open water with big rubber baits such as Bull Dawgs, Swimming Dawgs, Medusas, and Poseidons... Walleye fishing is strong, with mornings and evenings best, and anglers report success vertical jigging Rattle Traps, Jigging Raps, and others. Trolling crankbaits such as Flicker Shads, Tail Dancers, and deep diving Husky Jerks is also productive... Panfish action is also strong. Crappies are along weed edges and mid-lake structure containing good weeds. You will find big bluegills not far from the crappies.”  

Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky fishing slowed last week, likely due to the warm temperatures... Trolling Mattlocks continues to be a strong choice, especially for anglers targeting bigger fish. Casting Warlocks and various bucktails seems to produce the most fish... Walleye fishing is okay, but not spectacular. Anglers are switching to minnows, but crawlers remain a good choice. If live bait does not seem to work, try minnow swim baits with swim jigs, Jigging Raps, or 4-inch Gulp! on Kalin Darter Jigs. During the day, use electronics to locate schools of walleye on mud flat bottoms. In the evening, fish along weedlines and drop offs holding baitfish... Northern pike fishing is good in the weeds, with white and silver spinnerbaits outperforming all others, and the west side the best bet for large pike... Local guide Ron Bergman reports crappies are starting to school in Blueberry Flats and Moores Bay. Crappie Scrubs and Stinger Shads on 1/16-oz jigs, one-inch emerald shiner Gulp! Minnows, and crappie minnows all produce results.”  

FISHING REPORT

Musky:  Musky action is fair to very good and improving, depending on timing and weather. Search for fish on/around shallow to mid-depth weeds, drop-offs, shorelines, mid-lake structure, and suspending over deep water. The most productive bait types at this time include bucktails, big Bull Dawgs and similar rubber baits, jerkbaits, gliders, topwaters, and musky suckers on quick-strike rigs. Trolling large stickbaits and minnow baits is also effective.  

Walleye:   Walleye fishing is fair to good, with mornings and evenings still offering the best success. During the day, work in/on the edges of deeper holes and humps out to 20 feet or so and on the bottoms of mud flats. During evening into dark, work weed edges, weedlines, and drop-offs in 4-18 feet, depending on the lake. Bait preferences are transitioning. One or all traditional walleye offering might work... or not. Good choices include jigs with minnows or crawlers; cast and trolled crankbaits, swim jigs, and Gulp! Minnows; and jigging baits such as Jigging Raps.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike action is fair to good, particularly around green weeds and anywhere you find concentrations of panfish. Northern suckers, minnows, spinners, spinnerbaits, and Twister-tipped spoons all work. For trophy pike, fish bigger baits in deeper water.  

Largemouth Bass:  Largemouth fishing can be challenging this time of year as the fish scatter to a variety of depths and habitat, such as weeds, rock, brush, and other structure. Good baits to try at this time include swim jigs, wacky worms, jerkbaits, spinners, plastics, and even some topwaters. Top baits include wacky worms, swim jigs, spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, plastics, and topwaters.  

Smallmouth Bass:  Smallmouth action is erratic, though some anglers report good success. Look for fish in, on, and near deeper weeds, rocks, gravel, and other hard bottom areas. Minnows, crawlers, crankbaits, and plastics all work for smallmouth.  

Crappie:  Crappie fishing is good in 10-20 feet around weed edges and weedy structure, with fish in the early stages of schooling. Best baits include crappie minnows, tube jigs, Tattle-Tails, Mini-Mites, Crappie Scrubs, various plastics, and one-inch Gulp! Minnows.  

Bluegill:  Bluegills are providing very good early fall action around mid-depth to deeper weeds, with larger fish on the deeper edges and often near schooling crappies. Waxies, worms, crawler chunks, minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits are all effective offerings.  



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