Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County

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12/6/16 @ 9:47 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (43%)
Waxing Crescent

Excerpts from the December 5, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“We should be enjoying winter sports at this time of year,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “but with the weather we have had, it looks like it is still a little ways off... Open water season is basically over for this year, though anglers who ‘really’ want to get out could still do so... It’s time to start preparing for ice fishing season, especially early season walleye fishing. Early ice can be dangerous, so use a spud or auger to check ice thickness as you work your way out, and then look for deep weed edges, the greener the weeds the better. Set tip-ups using shiners or fatheads on those edges in afternoon and evening hours to catch walleye moving shallower to feed. At the start of the season, the best time is early evening through 8 p.m... You will find some perch mixed in with the walleye, so rig and jig for them. Crappies are deeper now and it is too early right after ice up to get out deep enough to look for crappie. Anglers will fish for them as the ice thickens.”  

At Hayward Bait, Sonya and Bob say musky anglers fished the season to its Nov. 30 close by boating some nice fish during the extended nice weather... “There is still a good walleye and crappie bite and anglers targeting them are doing very well. Use walleye suckers for walleyes and work live minnows and plastics in deeper basin areas for crappies."  

For all practical purposes, says DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt, the November 30 close of the Northern Zone musky season also brought a close to the 2016 open-water fishing season. “A few last minute musky anglers trying their luck had good success, catching and releasing fish up to 45 inches. There are a few reports of walleye anglers continuing to try their luck below the dams on rivers, but with low success, and most anglers are now waiting for solid ice cover... That said, nearly all area lakes still have open water and mild temperatures slow the formation of solid ice cover. We need several nights of calm weather and cold temperatures in the low teens or single digits to get ‘safe’ ice... Most ice anglers wait for 3-4 inches of clear new ice for their first ice fishing venture of the season, but that looks to be at least a week or so away yet.”  

FISHING REPORT  

While a few anglers are attempting to extend open water fishing season, consider it done for this year. Walleye anglers, most using walleye suckers, are having some luck below the dams. Crappie anglers were finding fish schooling/suspending in deep water, with crappie minnows and plastics the baits of choice. All things considered, a better use of time might be to prepare for ice fishing season! 

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11/29/16 @ 1:25 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE
New Moon

Excerpts from the November 28, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“Though not thick enough to walk on, ice covers the shallow bays on most lakes, ice has begun forming on the lakes, and there is not a lot of fishing activity,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “With luck, we will get time to build good ice before it snows, allowing ice fishing without slush and snow machine use all winter. Whatever happens, we are at the beginning of winter... For last gasp musky anglers, this is the best time for trophy fish. On small lakes, fish could be very active as they generally go on quite a feeding binge before ice builds. Suckers – if you can find them – are great for big fish action, and slow moving artificials such as Suicks, Eddie Baits, and Bull Dawgs are a must this time of year... Walleye fishing is fairly slow, with the colder weather increasing action, but decreasing the number of anglers. Jigs and minnows work best, with fish hitting in and on the edges of deeper drop-offs and deeper holes. The fish are generally schooling tightly when they are in this pattern... Crappie anglers report action, some of it very good, for fish schooling on the edges of deeper holes and on mud flats.”  

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says it is starting to feel more like winter with the cooler temperatures... “Ice has started to form on some small lakes, but there are still a few hardy anglers getting on the water. Most are chasing big muskies, with some trolling large crankbaits along steep breaks and points. Focus on deeper water, 15-35 feet, along those breaks, watch for baitfish on the electronics, and then thoroughly work those areas. In those same locations, you can have success fishing large suckers on quick-set rigs and vertical jigging... Walleyes are biting for those who are fishing for them. Use jigs with walleye suckers or slowly “crawl in” large swimbaits, targeting rock bars and cribs in deeper water... Some crappie anglers report good success. Search deep basin wintering areas for schools of suspending fish, with crappie minnows your best bet.”  

FISHING REPORT 

Musky:  Late season is “the” time for trophy muskies, but anglers have to deal with challenging conditions. Target deep breaks, points, and drop-offs in 12-35 feet and deeper, especially around baitfish. Suckers on quick-strike rigs are the preference, but tough to find, and many anglers are casting large Suicks, Eddie Baits, and Bull Dawgs, as well as trolling large crankbaits.  

Walleye:   Walleye action is slow, but finally improving, just as the ice is forming. Concentrate efforts in/on/on the edges of deep holes, drop-offs, rock bars, and cribs. Jigs with walleye suckers are the go-to bait, though some anglers fishing those same areas are having success slowly fishing large swimbaits.  

Crappie:   Crappie anglers – those who are on the water –report good success. Search for suspending fish in and on the edges of deep basins, holes, and mud flats. Crappie minnows work best, but plastics and Gulp! baits are also producing fish.  


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11/22/16 @ 9:37 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (36%)
Waning Crescent

Excerpts from the November 21, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“There are a few musky anglers still on the lakes,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “and they report moderate success... Anglers have recorded several lower- to mid-40s fish, all on live bait. Musky suckers are now a rare commodity and anglers planning a trip should call ahead to check availability or secure bait locally. Some anglers are successfully using stick-type baits such as Suicks and Eddie Baits – apparently the warmer weather left some muskies aggressive!... There are few reports from anglers fishing for other species. Most should be heading to and congregating in deeper water with the temperature drop. Maybe fishing will be better with first ice."  

Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky action is solid.  “Most musky catches are in shallower areas bordering river channels, especially those with many stumps. Live bait is very good, but sucker availability is low with the end of season near. However, glide baits and jerkbaits are still producing results...  Walleyes have not been very active with water temperatures constantly in the high 40s to low 50s, but this colder weather makes it tempting to try to snag a few deep walleyes, particularly on Round Lake. Walleye suckers are definitely the way to go at this time... The excellent smallmouth bite on Round Lake continues, with anglers fishing the cribs with small suckers on Lindy Rigs... For most crappie anglers, fishing has been a real dud this fall. The fish are schooling, but with very limited, if any, activity. That could change, however, with the dropping water temperatures.”  

According to DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt, fishing pressure is light on North Wood’s waters due to the cool, windy weather and gun deer season... “There are still a few musky anglers trying their luck, with nearly all of these late-season anglers dragging large suckers. Success continues to be good, with many reports of catches of fish up to 46 inches. There is a bit of fishing pressure on the managed trout lakes, as a few of the lakes received adult brood stock trout from the hatcheries. Anglers report fair success in the past few weeks, with some nice catches of rainbow, brown, and brook trout... At this time, there are no reports of any ice on lakes or flowages and it appears that any kind of ice cover could be well after deer season.”  

FISHING REPORT

Musky: Musky fishing is good, particular on suckers, but it is difficult to find suckers in the area. Focus on mid-depth to shallow structure. Some anglers are having success with artificials such as large gliders, stickbaits, and jerkbaits.  

Walleye: Walleye fishing is fair, with fish holding in deeper water and walleye suckers the bait of choice. Anglers might want to wait until first (safe) ice cover when fishing should improve – and first (safe) ice might not be all that far in the future!  

Crappie: Crappies are schooling, but fishing is slow, though anglers are picking up fish on the Flowage. Use crappie minnows and look for fish in 15-18 feet in Moores Bay and around Pine Point.  

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11/15/16 @ 3:14 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (98%)
Waning Gibbous

Excerpts from the November 14, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“It is a little cooler,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “but water temperatures actually went up last week!... Musky action is good, but not as consistent as anglers expect at this time, with best fishing when there is some wind and temperatures drop a bit. Sucker action is good, but also not as consistent as usual... Walleye fishing is good, though fish are not as concentrated as is normal for this time of year, as water temperatures delayed development of regular fall patterns. There is some good action on jig/minnow combinations in deep holes and drop-offs, although mostly for smaller fish... Crappie action improved, with fish deeper on mud flats outside of deep holes, and anglers report some good catches, as well as a few perch."

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says the warm weather remains and fishing is decent. “Most anglers are targeting muskies, with large suckers on quick-set rigs worked through 15-30 feet around steeper breaklines working best. Jigging smaller suckers on jigs can also be effective... Anglers chasing walleyes are finding the most action fishing jigs tipped with walleye suckers in 20-40 feet. Crappies are active and schooling. Look for schools of suspended fish in 15-30 feet, with crappie minnows on small jigs the best bet." 

Fishing activity continues to diminish, says DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt, even with the beautiful fall weather.  “... there are still many musky anglers trying their luck, with nearly all of them dragging around large suckers, hoping for that once-in-a-lifetime lunker. Fishing continues to be good, with many anglers finding muskies in a variety of habitats, from suspending over deep water to the edges of old weed beds to up shallow... A few walleye anglers still trying their luck report erratic success on the lakes and flowages, with a few catching ‘eater-size’ walleyes on large fatheads fished below dams on the rivers... There is a little surge in crappie and perch action, with crappies suspending in deeper water and perch active on mid-depth mud flats.”  

FISHING REPORT  

Musky: Late fall is trophy musky time and fishing is good, though the warmer water seems to have somewhat tempered the action. You can find fish in various locations on any given lake, from shallow to suspending over deep water to breaklines to weed beds. A sucker on a quick-strike rig is the top producing bait and presentation, though some anglers continue to use artificials with some success.

Walleye: Walleye action is fair to good, but still inconsistent. Fish are somewhat scattered in 18- 30 feet and deeper, in and around holes, drop-offs, and breaklines. Use jigs tipped with walleye suckers or large fatheads, though crankbaits can also work well. Do not overlook the rivers, especially below the dams.  

Northern Pike: Northern pike action is good around weeds and panfish concentrations at various depths. Northern and walleye suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, stickbaits, and spoons all work. For trophy fish, fish bigger baits in deeper water.  

Smallmouth Bass: This is a terrific time of year for smallmouth fishing, but few anglers are fishing for them – or they are keeping it a secret. The action can be amazing once you locate the smallmouth – read DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter’s informative piece in the upper section.  

Crappie: Crappie action is fair to good and improving as fish are now schooling and suspending in 10-28 feet and deeper water. Crappie minnows, waxies, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small jigs under slip bobbers all work for crappies.  

Perch: Panfish anglers are picking up a few perch on mid-depth weeds, weed edges, mud flats, and in some of the same areas holding walleyes. Try waxies, crawlers, and fatheads on small jigs.  


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11/8/16 @ 10:01 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (60%)
Waxing Gibbous

Excerpts from the November 7, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“The unusually warm fall weather brought a late drop in water temperatures,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “and most lakes in the area range from 47-51 degrees. Fall fishing reflects this warmth, turnover is in mid form, and the usual fall walleye and musky patterns are slow in arriving... Musky fishing is improving as the water temperatures drop, with the best fishing on suckers and sucker imitations on weed edges. Jerkbaits such as Eddie Baits and Suicks are also working now... Walleye fishing is fair, but not as good as usual in early November. The usual fall patterns should get going as the temperatures drop. The fish are deep, hitting jig and minnows combinations, but so far this fall, the fish are not showing a lot of size. The bite is only fair on the big, deep lakes. Work jigs tipped with large minnows on the drop-offs... Most anglers are concentrating on musky and walleye and very few anglers are fishing for northern pike or bass. However, you can still catch these fish in the weeds, especially if you can find some green weeds... Panfish action is almost non-existent, as most panfish anglers have put away their boats. However, those still fishing are finding crappies mixed in with the walleyes and perch in the weeds.. .”  

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says that with the warmer than normal weather, water temperatures range from the high 40s to low 50s... “The musky bite is quite good, with most fish coming on large suckers on quick-set rigs fished in 10-30 feet. There is some action for anglers casting large crankbaits, gliding jerkbaits, and big rubber baits such as Bull Dawgs. Other options include vertical jigging blade baits such as Fuzzy Duzzits or jigs with smaller suckers... Walleye anglers also report decent action, with most fish biting on walleye suckers and fatheads on jigs or rigs. Focus on deep points and cribs in 15-35 feet...  Crappies are starting to school in deeper water, 15-35 feet. On most lakes, fish are biting on small minnows and plastics either vertically jigged or fished under slip bobbers."

Hunting has pretty much replaced fishing as the main recreation in the last few weeks, says DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt... “The beginning of deer rut has bowhunters spending more time in their deer stands, and grouse hunters are still finding birds in fairly good numbers. Water temperatures are slowly dropping and most lakes are in the upper 40s... Muskies continue as the main species of interest and are providing some very good action. Most musky anglers are dragging live suckers and seeing quite a few fish in a variety of habitats, including the shallow weed edges, mid-depth flats, and some fish suspending over deeper water. The few anglers still throwing artificials with some success report fish are more active on sunny, warmer days after the water warms a bit... Walleye anglers who are still trying their luck report very inconsistent success, with good action for small and medium walleyes on some days and virtually no action on other days. Live minnows work best, fished on jigs, bare hooks dragged along the bottom, or below slip bobbers. On sunny days, look for the bite in late afternoon and right at dark, but cloudy days often produce some catches all day...  Panfish action is fair, with anglers catching a few nice crappie and perch along mid-depth breaks and near cover.”  

FISHING REPORT

Musky: Musky action is good to very good and getting better with the cooling water temperatures. Fish are scattered from shallow weeds to mid-depth flats to suspending over deep water, and suckers on quick-strike rigs are producing the majority of fish. Anglers fishing artificials report action is better late on warm, sunny days, with best success on large crankbaits, Bull Dawgs/rubber baits, gliders, and jerkbaits.

Walleye: Walleye action is fair to good, though erratic, and not quite up to expectations for early November. Best success is late in the day into dark, though daytime fishing can be productive on overcast days. Look for fish on points, bars, cribs, and drop-offs in 12-30 feet and deeper. Walleye suckers and fatheads, fished on plain hooks, jigs, and under slip bobbers, are the most productive offerings.  

Northern Pike: Northern pike continue to feed in and around weeds at various depths. Northern suckers, walleye suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, stickbaits, and spoons are all good choices. As always, try bigger baits in deeper water for trophy pike.  

Bass: Bass activity, as well as angler interest, has waned with the dropping air and water temperatures. However, the fish are still there and catchable for late season anglers. Look for largemouth in the weeds – preferably green weeds – and smallmouth in weeds and on hard bottom areas. Live bait works best for both at this time.  

Crappie: Crappie action is fair to good and getting better as fish start to school in deeper water. Look for them suspending on/near cover, along mid-depth breaklines, weedlines, brush, and in some of the same areas that hold walleye. Check the entire water column! Baits of choice include crappie minnows, waxies, plastics, and Gulp! baits under slip bobbers.  

Bluegill: Look for bluegills in 5-18 feet along breaklines, weedlines, rock, brush, and near other cover. Top baits include waxies, leaf worms, plastics, and Gulp! baits on plain hooks, small jigs, and teardrops.  

Perch: Perch are in a variety of depths in the weeds, on weed edges, and in some of the same areas you will find walleyes. Jigs with fatheads and crawlers should produce some action.  


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11/1/16 @ 8:34 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (4%)
Waxing Crescent

Excerpts from the October 31, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says the leaves are down, but fishing remains quite good.  “Muskies are the primary target for most anglers. Large suckers on quick-set rigs are working very well and providing consistent action on steeper breaks and edges in 8-25 feet. Try large gliding jerkbaits and big plastics along the same edges, as well as vertical jigging Fuzzy Duzzits and Bondy baits... Walleye action is solid with walleye suckers fished on humps and breaks in 15-35 feet. Crappie action is getting better and better and anglers should focus on basins and edges in 20-35 feet. Vertical jig small jigs and plastics or drift crappie minnows under slip bobbers."  

Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky action is good and getting better... “Musky anglers are catching some nice fish on suckers and jerkbaits around deeper river channel stumps, bars, and drop-offs. Walleye fishing is fair, but we need cooler water for fish to start their fall feeding frenzy... Smallmouth action continues to be good on Round Lake cribs for anglers using 4- to 5-inch sucker minnows on Lindy Rigs. Crappie fishing is picking up, with best action in morning and evening hours. Use jigs and one-inch Gulp! Minnows under slip bobbers for fish suspending in about 10 feet.”  

FISHING REPORT      

Musky: Musky action is good, consistent, and improving as we enter the final month of the season. Concentrate efforts in 8-25 feet near/on the edges of breaklines, bars, drop-offs, weeds, stumps, and river channels, and look for fish suspending adjacent to deep water. Medium to large suckers on quick-strike rigs are producing the most success, though slowly worked artificials such as Bull Dawgs/big plastics, gliders, and jerkbaits are also tempting muskies.

Walleye: Walleye action is fair to very good and improving with the cooling water temperatures. It is a jig and walleye sucker bite, and anglers should target humps, breaklines, stump fields, river channels, and mud flats in 15-35 feet.  

Northern Pike: Northern pike are still on the prowl in weeds at varied depths, hitting northern suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, and spoons. Fish deeper water with bigger baits for trophy pike.  

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth action remains good near/on deeper weeds, rocks, cribs, and other cover. Sucker minnows on live bait rigs, plastics, and drop-shot rigs offer the best success.  

Crappie: Crappie fishing is improving with the cooler water and fish starting to school. Look for fish suspending in 10-35 feet near cover and on basin edges. The best baits and presentations include drifting crappie minnows and Gulp! Minnows on small jigs under slip bobbers and vertical jigging small jigs tipped with plastics.  

Bluegill: Bluegill fishing is fair for anglers fishing waxies, worms, and plastics in weeds, brush, cribs, and other cover in varied depths. Try small minnows in deeper water for bigger bluegills.  

Perch: Perch fishing is good and improving. Work mud flats and weed beds with jigs and split shot rigs tipped with fatheads.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  


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11/1/16 @ 5:03 AM
FISHING REPORT
Jason Stewart
West Fork Jason
USER since 2/1/14

MOON PHASE (4%)
Waxing Crescent

I'm not sure where it all went,but put a fork into October b/c it's done!  As a consolation, November is starting out on the warm side so we're getting an extended season Musky fishing the rivers in the Hayward WI area.  Fly fishing for these toothy critters has been good to excellent.  For clients who are willing to consistently cover water most of the day while I work the oars on the drift boat, there have been some very nice fish willing to eat.  There are a few birds in the Northwoods as well, too many distractions.

Cheers and Good Luck!

JS


Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County Photo
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10/27/16 @ 8:59 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (8%)
Waning Crescent

Excerpts from the October 24, 2016 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

“Above average temperatures for this time of year renewed the interest of serious musky and walleye anglers,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “Partly cloudy skies and light to calm winds makes it an ideal time for anglers to be on the water... Muskies remain spread over the lake, with anglers catching fish from over weeds to on deeper drops, and best action with suckers on quick-strike rigs. Bull Dawgs, Medusas, and larger crankbaits are producing a few fish, but not the quantity as live bait... Walleyes moved deeper and anglers report moderate success during daylight hours in 12-18 feet. Vertical jigging a fathead works best and it still seems to be an evening bite, with late evening into dark producing the best success... There are few panfish reports, but the fish are still there. Crappies moved out of the weeds and dispersed throughout the lake. Earlier, anglers reported good crappies schooled on drops in 10-17 feet. The best bite is on crappie minnows under slip bobbers, at various depths, in late afternoon. Bluegills are holding in remaining green weeds, but will move deeper with the die-off of shallower weeds. Perch are just off weeds and on flats.,, As a reminder, Happy Hooker is closed from noon Oct. 27 through Oct. 31. Our daughter is getting married and she requires that we attend.”  

"Muskies continue to provide most of the fishing pressure", says DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt...  “Action is good, with most anglers switching from artificials to live suckers. Smaller suckers (10-14 inches) are providing the best action, with good numbers of fish up to 40 inches. However, the nicer fish are coming on large, 18-inch and larger suckers. This trend will continue as fall progresses, with the trophy potential getting better as water temperatures cool into the 40s... Walleye fishing is erratic, with fish not yet in a solid fall pattern. For now, use jig/minnow combinations and minnows on slip bobbers. Cloudy days often produce fair action during daytime hours. The few die-hard largemouth anglers still trying their luck report fair success on soft plastics fished around woody cover in 4-6 feet of water during afternoon hours on warm, sunny days... Panfish action is fair for crappie and perch along deep weed edges and near mid-depth cover.”  

FISHING REPORT     

Musky:  Musky action is good and getting better – and late fall is trophy time for musky anglers. Fish remain scattered with the warmer weather and water, and you can find them anywhere from shallow to deeper areas. Suckers on quick-strike rigs are by far the most productive at this time, but anglers are also catching a few fish on large Bull Dawgs, Medusas, crankbaits, and jerkbaits.  

Walleye:  Walleye fishing is decent and getting better, with some action during the day in 15-25 feet. The evening into dark bite is still best, however. Fatheads/minnows on jigs and under slip bobbers are the most productive presentations.  

Northern Pike:  Northern pike action is good around weeds and cover with northern suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, and spoons fished at a variety of depths. For trophy pike, target deeper water with bigger baits.  

Largemouth Bass:  Largemouth action is inconsistent and slowing with the cooling water, though decent on the warm, sunny days. Look for fish around weeds and wood in various depths, from shallow to deeper areas. Soft plastics are currently the go-to baits, but live bait can also produce interest.  

Smallmouth Bass:  Smallmouth fishing is good around deeper weeds, cribs, rock, and other cover. Sucker minnows, drop-shot rigs, and plastics remain the top producing baits.  

Crappie:  Crappie action is good when you find them. They are scattered and moving and/or have moved to deeper water. Try along weeds, weed edges, and other cover in 8-20 feet with crappie minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits under slip bobbers.  

Bluegill:   Bluegill fishing is fair to good in weeds, brush, cribs, and other cover in mid-depth to deeper water. Baits of choice include waxies, worms, and plastics, as well as small minnows for larger ‘gills.  

Perch:   Perch action is good around weeds, weed edges, and on flats in a variety of depths. Use waxies, worms, crawler chunks, small minnows, and plastics on small jigs or plain hooks, with/without slip bobbers.  

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992. 

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10/26/16 @ 1:34 PM
FISHING REPORT
TedT
TedT
USER since 9/23/14

MOON PHASE (14%)
Waning Crescent

- Per Wright's comments, bring your beer goggles and hookouts for safe handling


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10/26/16 @ 1:11 PM
Keggers1002
Keggers1002
USER since 1/14/14

Thanks fellas, I'll have to do some searching

and maybe go to "Phipps" and check out some late night holes ;-)

I'll send pics after the trip


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