Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County

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4/24/18 @ 9:38 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (70%)
Waxing Gibbous

Excerpts from the April 23, 2018 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

One week ago, the Hayward area was dealing with 20 inches of blowing snow. Now, with 65 degrees Monday and an extended forecast showing 60- to 70-degree highs in the next few weeks, it appears spring is (finally!) here for good. The sun and warm temperatures may or may not be enough to melt lake ice for the May 5 gamefish opener, but the weather is certainly moving in the right direction!

“This has been the April of our cold discontent,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “The impacts of frigid weather this month will last well into May, with expectations of near-record late ice-outs... This spring is shaping up similar to those of 2013 and 2014, with some of the latest ice-outs ever across the state, but this year might even be later. The first 12 days of April were bone-chilling cold, averaging 23 degrees, a full 10-15 degrees below normal. The first 12 days of March were warmer, with an average of 25 degrees!.. In some areas, through mid-April, ice anglers continue to report virtually no ice melt. At this point, many lakes remain covered in snow that reflects sunshine and protects the ice from rotting... If you plan to fish open-water lakes come the May 5 gamefish opener – that is less than two weeks away – you may want to be flexible on where and how you plan to fish. Maybe try a river – or bring an auger!.. The good news is that we do have some melting now and the 10-day forecast says temperatures will rise into the 50s and even into the 60s, with lots of sunshine. However, that is short of the number of days required to melt the snow and ice in earnest. A few days ago, a friend said it would take about 27 days of these higher temperatures, along with some rain, to rid the lakes of ice, and he predicted about May 16. What is your guess?”  

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says spring is finally trying to get here, but a few anglers are still venturing out onto the ice... "The anglers who are getting on the ice report decent success. Most of the anglers are targeting crappie and bluegill and say the fish are starting to push shallow. Use caution and definitely be aware, as ice conditions are starting to change... A few anglers who are now hitting the rivers and streams for suckers and redhorse report some success and crawlers will get the job done...  There are also success reports coming in from anglers fishing the Brule River. The bite is sporadic, but anglers are catching some good fish. Spawn, flies, and hard baits can all produce some action." 

The 34th Annual Treeland Challenge catch and release bass and walleye tournament is May 11-13 on the Chippewa Flowage. The event offers thousands of dollars in contest and drawing prizes.  First through third prizes will be awarded for bass and walleye categories for each division..  Daily door prizes and a Grand Prize drawing.  For more information, including registration, visit www.treelandresorts.com or call (715) 462-3874).  

FISHING REPORT 

 Area lakes still have considerable ice depths and some anglers continue to have success in their pursuit of crappie and bluegill. Sunshine and warm temperatures (and some rain and wind) could take out much of the ice between now and the May 5 gamefish opener, but plan for the best (open water) and prepare for the “not best” (i.e., an ice fishing opener!)

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  

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4/17/18 @ 9:20 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (4%)
Waxing Crescent

Excerpts from the April 16, 2018 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Technically, we are in the fourth week of spring. Real-life observations, however, indicate winter decided to extend (over-extend!) its stay. The forecast for this week shows a clearing, warming trend after mid-week and we can only hope it comes to fruition. Sunshine, wind, warm temperatures, and even some rain could go a long way to removing much of the ice (up to two feet or more on some lakes) before the May 5 gamefish opener.  

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says it is somewhat quiet on the water... “Most lakes still have more than 20 inches of ice, but use great caution around current areas. There are only a handful of anglers venturing out on the ice, though they offer some decent reports, mostly on crappies... The fish are starting to move shallower and are getting a little more aggressive. Keep hole hopping – definitely keep moving shallow – until the fish light up your graph. Waxies and plastics are working just fine."

Mike at Jenk’s says opening weekend is three weeks away, but there is still plenty of ice on the Chippewa Flowage... “Reports from some anglers say the average ice depth is around 24 inches – and time is getting a bit short for full open water for opening weekend. However, judging from all incoming weather reports, this past weekend was the last gasp of winter and it will only continue to get warmer... Extended forecasts suggest temperatures will begin an ascent into the 40s, get into the 50s by Friday, and next week see temperatures in the low to mid 60s.”  

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses self-sustaining fish populations... “Long-time Sawyer County DNR fisheries biologist Frank Pratt has an interesting observation that may change how you think about fish populations. He points out that in a stable, self-sustaining fish population, one should only expect each fish to replace itself once, through successful spawning... Think about this in the context of a female muskellunge that might lay 100,000 eggs for 10 years of her life, totaling 1 million eggs! In a stable population where the number of muskellunge does not change much, she is a success if just one of those eggs survives to adulthood to replace her in the population... Some fish are more successful reproductively than others, of course. A female that is diseased or smaller than average might have worse odds of reproductive success. She may never reproduce successfully and have offspring surviving to adulthood. Another larger, healthy female might be lucky enough to have 10 offspring survive to be adults... This is what drives natural selection and evolution – the fit not only survive, but successfully pass on their genes to the next generation.”  

Former DNR fisheries biologist Frank Pratt will offer his “Fishing” presentation at Weiss Community Library Saturday, May 5, starting at 10:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.weisscommunitylibrary.com, email hlibrary@hayward.wislib.org, or call (715) 634-2161.  

Anglers planning trips for the general fishing opener May 5 should check out the 2018 Wisconsin Fishing Report available online, in hard copy at DNR service centers, and in Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine. The report contains ‘where to fish’ recommendations from fisheries biologists from around the state and forecasts, by species, from DNR fisheries biologists for waters in their area. The forecasts contain a mixture of recent fish survey results on abundance and size, descriptions of habitat projects, reminders on new rules, and many photos of impressive fish captured (and released) during DNR fisheries assessments. For more information, and to view the 20-page forecast online, search “fishing report” on the DNR website.  

FISHING REPORT  

Anglers continue to pursue panfish, but recent weather conditions have not been conducive to being on the ice. This past weekend, snowfall pushing the 20-inch range and very strong winds kept fishing interest to a minimum (if it existed!) and travel conditions on the ice are challenging. Still, anglers who do go out are reporting good success for crappies and bluegills. Most area lakes still have ice depths up to two feet (or more) and the fishing opener is less than three weeks distant. Forecasts say warmer weather is on the way, but this spring’s ice-out could cut it very close, at best.

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  


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4/12/18 @ 9:03 AM
fishen_soon
fishen_soon
MEMBER since 6/24/14

Round and Little Round are 10 fish per type, 25 combined bag limit.  So only 10 Crappie, 10 Perch or 10 Bluegill for total of 25. Don't know about other lakes.  You need to check Regs. for each body of water you fish.

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4/12/18 @ 7:41 AM
kvandehei33
kvandehei33
USER since 12/19/11

I thought I read somewhere about decreasing the individual panfish limit to 10 of each species, for a total of 25. Can't remember where I saw that though, it might have just been speculation.

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4/11/18 @ 4:15 PM
Down2erth
Down2erth
USER since 6/21/01

So what exactly does "Quality panfish management for the Chippewa Flowage" mean? I assume the reduction of daily bag and possession limits? Never heard it quite called that before. 

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4/11/18 @ 11:28 AM
Big Chip Guide Service
Tim Czub
USER since 9/8/03

Here are the results from the WCC annual Spring hearings that were held here in Sawyer County at the Winter High School on april 9th.

https://dnr.wi.gov/about/wcc/Documents/spring_hearing/2018/2018StatewideResults.pdf

Give me a call, text or email me to book your 2018 fishing trip out on the Famous Chippewa Flowage!

TC

(715) 820-1823
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4/11/18 @ 11:14 AM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (20%)
Waning Crescent

Excerpts from the April 9, 2018 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Last Sunday’s sub-zero low temperatures were a bit of surprise, but this week’s forecast indicates a slight warming trend – though mixed with various types of precipitation. On a more positive note, the extended forecast shows the following week and the remainder of April with mild to warm temperatures. The warmer the better, as the Wisconsin fishing opener is May 5 and the ice on some area lakes is holding at more than two-foot depths!

Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says there are few fishing reports due to recent snows and colder temperatures... “There is quite a bit of snow – and way too much ice! Still, some anglers are targeting crappies and bluegills with some success. Crappies are holding in deeper water and are most active on minnows and plastics. Anglers should stay mobile until they find some fish... Bluegill anglers should target shallow flats, using waxies, spikes, and plastics... A few anglers are taking advantage of the early catch and release trout season, but they have to deal with a lot of snow. Some anglers are hitting the Brule River for steelhead. They report low, clear water conditions so fishing is tough – but they also report catching a few fish... Pray for some warmer weather for the fishing opener!” 

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter addresses the question of fish spawning under the ice... “This late spring has many anglers wondering what the 2018 spawning season looks like for Wisconsin fish. As winter in the north clings on through the typical spawning time frame – April is the usual spawning season for walleye and pike – some anglers might wonder if fish will spawn under the ice. The short answer appears to be ‘no’... Northern pike spawn at some of the coldest water temperatures, but Becker’s Fishes of Wisconsin specifically states that pike spawning begins ‘as soon as the ice breaks up in the spring.’" 

FISHING REPORT    

Fishing success remains good, but travel ON the ice remains difficult due to snow and slush. Still, anglers who are getting on the ice report decent success. The fishing opener is only four weeks away and this week’s weather is not too spring-like. However, the extended forecast for mid-April until the May 5 opening weekend is indicating somewhat warmer temperatures. The question is if it will be warm enough, soon enough.  

Crappie: Crappie fishing is fair to very good once you locate the fish. Plan to move to find fish and keep on them. Target deeper water, but check the entire water column, as the fish can be anywhere within the column. The most productive baits include crappie minnows, waxies, and plastics tipped on small jigs, plain hooks, and panfish spoons. Action is generally better late in the day to dark.     

Bluegill: Bluegill fishing is fair to good for anglers fishing shallow flats, weeds, and various structure in depths out to 20 feet. Top baits include waxies, spikes, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small jigs, teardrops, and plain hooks. Try small minnows for larger ‘gills.     

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  

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4/9/18 @ 12:54 PM
troutbum12
troutbum12
USER since 12/21/11

Another foot of snow coming  this weekend

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4/3/18 @ 2:59 PM
FISHING REPORT
Hayward Lakes VCB
HLVCB
USER since 6/3/08

MOON PHASE (89%)
Waning Gibbous

Excerpts from the April 2, 2018 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report by Steve Suman:

Spring arrived in the North Woods, but apparently went into hiding! More than a foot of snow fell on the Hayward area this past Saturday, followed by an Easter Sunday morning low of near zero. The current forecast says two storm systems moving in late Monday afternoon/night through Tuesday could drop another 8 inches or more of accumulation.

“Lake ice remains solid at 20-25 inches,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “but ice fishing has had some very limited participation... Anglers who do venture out report somewhat moderate success, picking up some crappies in deeper holes, as well as finding some perch just off shallow weeds. The baits of choice include crappie minnows and waxies, with the better bite seeming to occur in the afternoon hours into dusk... Travel on the lakes can be difficult, as the snow has compacted due to some melting, leaving a crust on the top. If you break though, you could find yourself standing in a foot of snow and water. Snowshoes will help you traverse the lake, but otherwise stay on the beaten paths or trail... The new 2018-19 fishing regulations are now available. The most notable change is that the ‘temporary’ trolling regulations in effect during the past years are now permanent trolling rules. Be sure to check what new regulations apply to the county or counties you intend to fish... The new inland gamefish season opens May 5, but until that time, renew your fishing license (the old licenses expired!), check your equipment, and repair and/or replace as necessary.”  

Erik at Hayward Bait says there is still plenty of ice on Hayward area lakes.  “It looks as if ice season could extend well into mid-April, but anglers should use caution on lakes with flowing water, such as a river coming in or exiting. Overall, conditions vary from lake to lake as to whether a lake has a lot of slush, minimal slush, or no slush at all... Anglers chasing crappies are finding active fish, as well as some slight, beginning signs of staging fish. Look for those active crappies as shallow as 12 feet, with some anglers catching fish 3-5 feet just below the ice. Keep moving to keep on top of the crappie schools, dropping smaller spoons or jigs tipped with waxies, spikes, and crappie minnows. For active fish, panfish plastics can usually seal the deal... Bluegill anglers are finding the most success just off weed edges and flats. Many of these fish are very active, yet the bite can vary from a light bite to a hard-hitting one on a day-to-day basis. Try fishing smaller jigs tipped with waxies and spikes, or try small panfish spoons for the real active fish. Drill holes in 12-18 feet of water and if you are not on active fish, keep moving and drilling more holes... “Lake Superior tributaries and the lower Brule River opened for steelhead fishing March 31, but you might want to take your snowshoes!... If you are not interested in getting on the ice, keep in mind the general fishing opener is coming soon and this is a good time to start going through rods and reels, installing new line, and rigging boats.  

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses musky age and trophy potential... “Anglers across North America value muskellunge as a trophy species – and a combination of factors determine if a fish is able to achieve trophy size. A study by Dr. John Casselman presented at the 2016 Muskellunge Symposium in Minnesota detailed how conditions that lead to creation of trophy muskies have changed over time... Harvest of muskellunge was once the norm. Since fish were not living as long, this led to populations of smaller average size and lower average age. In the late 1970s, the age of trophy muskellunge (obtained from examining fish sent to taxidermists) averaged around 10 years. Today, trophy muskies average around 15 years old, but that is just an average. The maximum age of trophy muskellunge is typically between 25-30 years... Of course, the biggest muskies will be the ones that are able to live the longest, meaning that limiting mortality is a key management goal for creating trophy fish... Since the 1990s, musky anglers have practiced catch and release nearly universally, leading to reductions in muskellunge mortality as well as being responsible for creating fisheries with older fish and a bigger average size. However, even with catch and release, an estimated 16-26 percent of trophy muskellunge die of natural causes each year... Muskies are not immortal, after all, and even by giving them a hand through catch and release, it takes a special fish to live for 30 years.”  

FISHING REPORT   

Here’s the final reminder that 2017-18 fishing licenses expired this past Saturday, March 31, so get your new license now so you are ready for the 2018 inland gamefish season opener Saturday, May 5 (whether or not snow and ice cover the lakes!) Speaking of which, ice conditions remain good for ice anglers, though access and travel on the lakes can present a challenge due to snow accumulations and slush.  

Crappie: Crappie fishing is good, with fish near weeds or suspending out to about 25 feet. Be sure to check the entire water column – fish can be on the bottom or just below the ice. Move with the schools and the best action is in later afternoon until dark. Bait choices include crappie minnows, rosy reds, waxies, spikes, and plastics fished on teardrops, small jigs and spoons, and plain hooks.   

Bluegill: Bluegill fishing is fair off flats, weed edges, and structure out to about 20 feet. Best baits include small jigs and teardrops tipped with waxies, spikes, plastics, and Gulp! baits. Smaller can be better – downsize for more action.    

Perch: Perch action is fair to good, with fish just off shallower weeds and on deeper soft bottoms, hitting crappie minnows, fatheads, waxies, spikes, and plastics.    

For more information on area events and activities, visit the Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau website, view its Calendar of Events, or call 800-724-2992.  

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3/30/18 @ 8:56 AM
FISHING REPORT
Swamp buck
Swamp buck
USER since 1/23/09

MOON PHASE (99%)
Waxing Gibbous

If it doesn't warm up we'll be using tip-ups on opening day!

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 1,302 Posts