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Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County (all postings)

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PETE RICH
PETE RICH
Joined: 6/9/2015
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
7/2/15 5:46 AM CST
Water Temp: 71° - 75° F
With the fullmoon here this week the big muskies are very active. Had a string of bad luck early in the week but had action from some giant fish. Last night we finally cashed in on most of our opportunities. For the 2nd time in two days I lost a low 50 inch fish. We did stick the other two that struck last night though and ended up with a 40 and 46.

I'm finding active muskies inain lake weeds and fish have been responding to small bucktails with a fast retrieve. There is also a great night bite going right now so if you can out last the mosquitos there is great action.


Pete Rich Guide Service
(815) 762-3973
JIM STROEDE
JIM STROEDE
Joined: 1/8/2015
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
7/1/15 4:13 AM CST
Walleye fishing has been real good around the area recently. We've been catching fish in a variety of different ways, jigging, slip bobbering, and trolling are all catching fish for us on Hayward area lakes.

[This post was last edited on 7/1/15 at 4:15 AM]
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/30/15 10:37 AM CST
June 29, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

A wet and stormy start to the week, but the forecasts predict a generally sunny and mild week ahead. However you spend it, enjoy a fun July 4 Independence Day celebration!

“July Fourth weekend is this weekend and it is time for summer to really show!” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “Fish muskies around weeds and drop-offs with medium to large bucktails, crankbaits, and topwaters. Walleyes are holding in deeper weeds offering cover and cool conditions. Fish areas with exposed sand and rock with crawlers or leeches on jigs. Walleyes often move to cribs in July, so give them a shot. Smallmouth fishing is good in deeper water with deeper running lures.” “Panfish are all over the board, with reports of some bluegills still in shallow weed beds. Most crappies and bluegills are in deeper water, but check weedy areas closer to shore.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage musky fishing remains good to excellent. “Fish in/over/around/through fresh green weeds in 3-10 feet using black-tailed Ghosttails or Flowage Boa bucktails with orange or green #8 Colorado blades. Work topwaters over weeds during low light. Walleyes are scattered. Try leeches around wood, sunken bogs, and weed edges in 12-20 feet. “For northern pike, work heavy weeds on the west side with spinner and twitch baits. Catch largemouth in those same areas with weedless plastics and topwaters. “Crappie action is great in 15-20 feet, in weeds in 6-10 feet, and along bogs in the evening, with crappie minnows and jig with tubes or plastics.” Jim at Hayward Bait says muskie action is fair in 8-15 feet. “Bucktails, gliders, tubes, Bull Dawgs, and suckers all produce fish. Catch walleyes on weedlines and gravel bars in 10-25 feet with leeches, crawlers, fatheads, walleye suckers, and trolled crankbaits and stickbaits. Fish northerns on weedlines in 7-15 feet with northern suckers, spinnerbaits, spoons, and Rapalas. “For largemouth, fish crawlers, walleye suckers, leeches, buzz baits, plastics, and topwaters in 3-10 feet. For smallmouth, use jigs, Twister Tails, crayfish imitations, spinnerbaits, topwaters, crawlers, and leeches. “Crappies are scattered around weeds, taking crappie minnows, waxies, plastics, and Gulp! baits. Catch bluegills in 3-10 feet with waxies, leaf worms, Gulp! baits, Tattle-Tails, and plastics.” Mike at Jenk’s says muskies are active on surface and sub-surface baits fished on weed edges, stumps, and drop offs. “Walleye action is improving, with activity starting just before dark on crawlers and leeches, though anglers still swearing by minnows. Northern action is good, though primarily for smaller fish. “Bass action is slow, with catches mainly of smaller size fish biting on poppers, plastics, and spinnerbaits. Crappies scattered again, from shallow to brush piles and bogs. They do not seem picky on baits, but the trick is finding them.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says Nelson Lake anglers are catching some walleyes. “Fish rocky shorelines and weed edges using jigs and minnows or leeches and stickbaits early in the day or late evenings. During the day, work drop offs and the river channel. For northerns, float large sucker minnows under a bobber while casting surface baits and dressed spinners along weed and reed edges. “Cast for largemouth in and along weed beds with floating plugs, frogs, scented worms, and dressed swim jigs. Catch bluegills and crappies in 5-8 feet on live bait, tubes, Beetle Spins, and plastics.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter lists Sawyer County’s ‘other’ world records. “Nearly everyone knows about the world record fish of Louis Spray and Cal Johnson, but Sawyer County is home to many other current world records. “In 1983, Nelson Lake produced the yellow bullhead record (3 lb. 5 oz.) and in 1986 the 12 lb. test bluegill record (2 lb. 2 oz.). Big Sissabagama holds the record for musky on 45 lb. test (48 lb. 8 oz., 1977). “The Namekagon River holds the record for greater redhorse on 4 lb. test at 4 lb. 13 oz. from 2000 and the 36 lb. test brown trout at 6 lb. 9 oz. from 1988. The Brunet River holds records for musky on 2 lb. fly fishing (6 lb. 12 oz., 1984) and the all-tackle shorthead redhorse, an incredible 11 lb. 5 oz. fish from 1983. “In 1998, the Chippewa River’s West Fork produced a 10 lb. test record walleye at 8 lb. 0 oz. The Chippewa Flowage has nine different hybrid (tiger) musky records, while Lac Courte Oreilles and the Chippewa River each have one. “Perhaps the area’s strangest record, considering their rarity, is the 6 lb. test channel catfish record set in 2008 on the Chippewa Flowage – at 45 inches, the catfish was just one inch shy of the all tackle record. “Many thanks to Emmett Brown at the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame for the information.” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says fishing is good when anglers can get on the water. “Muskies are actively feeding on the Flambeau and Chippewa Rivers and their flowages. Use bucktails, jerkbaits, and topwaters, with the best action in late afternoon. Subsiding mayfly hatches improved walleye action on many lakes. Fish leeches and crawlers on floating jig heads near weeds and hard bottom/muck breaklines in 6-12 feet. “Fish largemouth on weed beds with topwaters and soft plastics. For smallmouth moving to mid-depth rock and wood cover, use plastics and spinnerbaits. “For crappies, fish small minnows on slip bobbers over mid-depth structure and along shallow weedlines. Some bluegills are still shallow.”

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky fishing is fair to excellent, depending on the day, lake ... and angler. Concentrate on green weeds, weed edges, and drop-offs in 3-17 feet of water. Lure producing the most success include bucktails, gliders, tubes, Bull Dawgs, crankbaits, jerkbaits, topwaters, and suckers. Match bait types and colors to the water and cover conditions.

Walleye: Walleye fishing is fair to good, with best action starting just before dark. Fish are in various locations, including weedlines, breaklines, bogs, gravel bars, sand, rock, cribs, and drop-offs in 5-25 feet, depending on light and time of day. Crawlers and leeches on jigs, Lindy Rigs, slip bobbers, and split shot rigs lead the list, but fatheads, walleye suckers, plastics, crankbaits, and stickbaits work as well.

Northern Pike: Northern action slowed, though smaller fish are very active. Work weedlines in 4-12 feet with northern suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, twitch and minnow baits, and stickbaits. Fish deeper water with larger baits for trophy pike.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth fishing is good to very good around thick weeds, slop, brush, cribs, lily pads, and similar heavy cover. Best baits include rigged and scented worms, swim jigs, weedless/soft plastics, spinnerbaits, surface baits, poppers, Jitterbugs topwater frogs, crawlers, walleye suckers, and leeches.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth action is very good and improving, with fish around mid-depth to deeper weeds, rock, and wood. Baits of choice include jigs with trailers, plastics, crawfish imitations, spinnerbaits, deep running crankbaits, tubes, topwaters, crawlers, and leeches.

Crappie: Crappies are scattered and suspending, but fishing is good once you find them. Look for fish in 4-20 feet of water around weeds and weedlines, bogs, brush, and cribs. Top producing baits include crappie minnows, waxies, tube jigs, plastics, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, Twister Tails, Gulp! baits, and Beetle Spins.

Bluegill: Bluegill fishing is good to very good and some fish are still in the shallows. Check depths from 2-12 feet around weed beds, brush, and cribs. Waxies, leaf worms, plastics, Gulp! baits, tube jigs, Tattle-Tails, Mini-Mites, and Beetle Spins will all catch ‘gills.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

PETE RICH
PETE RICH
Joined: 6/9/2015
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/24/15 2:18 PM CST
Water Temp: 71° - 75° F
Muskies are active in weed but the deeper edge is holding more active fish. Fish have been responding to a verity of lure presentations bucktails, topwaters, bulldawgs, and baby beavers have been hot. I guided Bill and Robin this morning and we had a bunch of action. We moved 5 fish and got this 37" in the figure 8.


Pete Rich Guide Service
(815) 762-3973
BIG CHIP GUIDE SERVICE
See Profile
Profile
Joined: 9/8/2003
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/23/15 11:20 AM CST
Conditions: Partly Sunny
Guided Ray and Al for Crappies on Thursday out on the Chippewa Flowage. They we're staying at Treelands. Found plenty of fish out deeper in the brush piles and cribs. Ended up keeping 35 and threw plenty of smaller ones back. GULP bait on 1/16 oz jigs tricked them. On Friday, I took out Brandon and Jen for a full day of fishing, again on the flowage. They were camping at Shady Nook Resort. We fished for Walleyes the first half then for Musky the second part of the day. Now Jen, who has never fished before ever, caught her first walleye. She didn't want to hold it so I got behind her and hid so it looks like she's the one holding the fish. She was laughing uncontrollably. We ended up catching 3 that we're just shy of 15 and returned. Beautiful day but kind of slow for us. We used Sip bobbers/ jig and leeches on the sunken bogs.

After lunch and switching out to the Musky gear, our first spot was over to practice bay to teach Jen how to throw the big gear. After a short tutorial she was Musky fishing. Unfortunately, we didn't raise a fish that afternoon but a super fun day with a great young couple.

Fathers day I took out my daughter and JT's family for a Fathers Day event, fishing for Crappies. Again, caught plenty of smaller sized class fish but ended up finding 30 keepers. What a beautiful day to be out on the water with the family fishing.

See you on the water! TC Big Smile

[This post was last edited on 6/23/15 at 11:23 AM]

Big Chip Guide Service
(715) 820-1823
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/23/15 11:11 AM CST
June 22, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

The forecasts state (repeatedly) chances of rain and thunderstorms at 30-40 percent – which is 60 to 70 percent against rain and thunderstorms. Go with the odds!

“We will endure what we receive,” says Pat at Happy Hooker, “but a week of stable weather would improve fishing! “Muskies are near shallow weeds and panfish concentrations. Use medium lures with slow retrieves. For walleyes, fish weedlines along the first break in 10-15 feet with jigs and minnows, leeches, and crawlers. “Bass fishing is good, though slows in cooler times. Crappies are suspending off weeds and drops in 10-20 feet. Use small plastics, tube jigs, and crappie minnow under slip bobbers. For bluegills, use small jigs, worms, waxies, flies, and ant imitations.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage musky action is improving. “Fish muskies near green weeds in 3-8 feet. Use black-tailed bucktails with green, orange, or chartreuse blades. During low light, try topwaters. For walleyes, fish woody areas in 14-22 feet near river channels with leeches and fatheads on jigs and slip bobbers. “Catch largemouth in thick weeds on the west side with weedless plastics and frogs. Catch smallmouth on rock and wood on the east side with Beetle Spins and jigs/leeches. “Fish crappies on sunken bogs in 12-20 feet – floating bogs in the evening – with crappie minnows, Gulp! baits, and tube jigs. For bluegills, use waxies, worms, and plastics.” Jim at Hayward Bait says musky action is good on Bull Dawgs and gliders over structure in 15-20 feet. “Walleye fishing is decent with walleye suckers and fatheads on live bait rigs, and jigs with leeches, crawlers, and fatheads in 8-22 feet on gravel bars, points, and mid lake humps. Pike action is good on northern suckers, spoons, and spinnerbaits along weedlines in 8-15 feet. “Crappies are dispersing as they move to weeds in 8-15 feet. Fish bluegills in 2-5 feet with waxies and plastics.” Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky anglers report many follows, but few connections. “Use smaller surface and subsurface baits. Catch small walleyes in deep brush; catch bigger fish on shallow humps with stumps and wood near river channels. Favored baits include minnows, crawlers, leeches, and crankbaits. For pike, use spinners and spoons in weeds and around shallow structure. “For largemouth, fish stumps, weeds, and rocks with crawlers and poppers. Though not typical at this time, anglers are catching crappies in weeds in 2-3 feet with crappie minnows and Gulp! baits.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says fishing is good on Nelson Lake. “For walleyes, jig fatheads, bobber-fish leeches, or cast/troll diving baits, Beetle Spins, and crawlers on Lindy Rigs along rocky shorelines and weed beds. Catch northerns by floating sucker minnows while casting Mepps bucktails along weedlines. “Largemouth are hitting swim jigs, spinners, buzz baits, frogs, and scented worms. Crappies are taking minnows and waxies on jigs and spinners. Fish panfish with waxies, worms, leeches, Gulp! baits, surface baits, and flies in 5-6 feet.”

Carolyn at Anglers All in Ashland says Chequamegon Bay anglers report success for most species. “Brown and lake trout fishing is excellent for anglers trolling spoons and stickbaits. Work the first break in early morning, moving deeper with the rising sun. “You might find transitioning smallmouth anywhere from 2-20 feet. Use sucker minnows in deeper water and plastics in the shallows. “For walleyes, troll stickbaits over channel edges or over humps and weed beds on the bottom.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses walleye cannibalism. “While most anglers think of perch and small panfish as the usual prey for walleye, walleyes have another common food type that may be a surprise: other walleyes. “Cannibalism is common in walleye, as with many other fish species. Researchers in New York found young walleye in 4 percent of adult walleye stomachs. This becomes more common with a high abundance of small walleye. “In lakes with few other predators, cannibalism can become a major factor in limiting walleye year class strength. “Currently, these situations are rare in the Hayward area.” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says biting insects – mosquitoes, deer flies, horse flies, no-see-ums, and gnats – are out in increasing numbers, so bring repellent. “Fish muskies along deeper weedlines with smaller bucktails and stickbaits. Mayfly hatches upset the walleye bite on many lakes, but try leeches and crawlers. Northern action is good around shallow new weeds. “Most bass completed spawning, though some males still guard their young fish. Crappies are suspending over mid-depth structure and deeper weed beds; good numbers of bluegills are still on spawning beds.”

Hayward Bass Club’s Round Lakes Open bass tournament is Sunday June 28, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The entry fee is $100 per boat, limited to the first 50 two-person teams, with a 90-percent payout. The remaining 10 percent funds the club’s free Youth Bass Tournament in late summer. Register at Hayward Bait or contact Wayne Balsavich (715) 699-1015; haywardbassclub@gmail.com).

Hayward’s 66th Annual Musky Festival, Hayward’s largest community festival celebrating the North Woods and our great fishing tradition, is this week, June 25-28. Attractions and festivities include crowning of the Musky Festival Queen, sidewalk sales, live music, children’s games, food booths, runs/races, fishing contest, carnival, and street dances. The weekend concludes Sunday with the Grand Parade down Main Street. The Hayward Lions Fishing Contest runs June 26-28 and includes all Hayward waters. There is no entry fee. All entrants 12 and younger receive a tackle bag. All entrants receive one free raffle ticket; additional tickets cost $1 or 6/$5. The raffle drawing is 11:30 a.m. Sunday, June 28, at the contest booth. One prize per entrant and must be present to win. The DNR will host kids fishing at Shue’s Pond Friday and Saturday, June 26-27, from noon until 4 p.m. Fisheries staff provides tackle, bait, and assistance. For more information, contact Hayward Area Chamber of Commerce (715) 634-8662.

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky anglers report observing good numbers of fish, but not many hook-ups. Fish 4-20 feet along green weedlines, and near structure. Bait preferences include bucktails, Bull Dawgs, stickbaits, gliders, and topwaters. If action is slow, try smaller baits.

Walleye: Walleye fishing is fair to good, though mayfly hatches have affected the bite. Fish are scattered from 6-25 feet, depending on the lake, day, and time, on weeds, wood, rock, gravel, brush, breaks, humps, stumps, and points. Top baits include walleye suckers, fatheads, leeches, and crawlers on jigs, slip bobbers, live bait rigs, and split shot rigs. For artificials, try Beetle Spins, crankbaits, and stickbaits.

Northern Pike: Northern action is good around weeds in 4-18 feet near structure and panfish. Productive baits include northern suckers, spinners, spinnerbaits, and spoons. For trophy pike, work deeper water with larger baits.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth are active on shallow to mid-depth weeds, stumps, slop, rocks, brush, and cribs. Work those areas with weedless plastics, frogs, rigged worms, swim jigs, spinners, and topwaters.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth action is inconsistent. Fish rock and wood in various depths with tubes and plastics in crawfish colors, rigged worms, Beetle Spins, and jigs with leeches or crawlers.

Crappie: Crappies are scattered from 2-25 feet, but moving deeper and suspending on/over weeds and weedlines, bogs, brush, drop-offs, and cribs. Baits of choice include crappie minnows, tubes, plastics, Gulp! baits, and waxies on jigs or slip bobbers, and small spinners.

Bluegill: Good numbers of bluegill remain on spawning beds in 2-6 feet of water. They will hit nearly any offering, but best choices include waxies, worms, leeches, plastics, and Gulp! baits, and small surface baits.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

BIG CHIP GUIDE SERVICE
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Joined: 9/8/2003
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/16/15 9:43 AM CST
Guided Pat and his 12 year old son Musky fishing Saturday on the Chippewa Flowage, out of The Landing Resort. Fished main lake structure throwing prop baits and bucktails. The kid missed one on a orange and black Tally Wacker at the beginning of his retrieve. Had a high 30 inch fish take a swipe at a green and black Cow Girl. Fished in the rain for another hour and decide to call it quits and go have lunch and watch the rain from inside.

Sunday I took out Bob and Kevin from Shady Nook Resort. They been coming up for many of years and wanted to find some newer spots. We targeted Crappies to start. Fished sunken bogs mostly using GULP and Mini Mites. Pink and white was the hot color. We decide to switch gears and show him a few Walleye spots. The bite was a bit tough due to blue skies and flat conditions. Bob did manage to haul in a 21 incher on a jig and leach.

For the second part of the day I took out Bob's grandson Jack and his buddy Nick for some Crappie fun! We jumped around the East side, fishing nothing but sunken bogs. Even found some new spots. It was non stop action in some spots and boy, did they have a blast! We boated well over 100 keeping 35. Nothing real big but some great action and some good eating!

Things are heating up on the Big Chip! Give me a call to get in on this fun!

TC


Big Chip Guide Service
(715) 820-1823
MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/15/15 6:33 PM CST
Been out on LCO & Grindstone the past few days fishing smallies & muskies. We're still getting smallies up shallow on the rocks with plastics & Gulp leeches. There are some fish off the breaks as well in 8-15 ft. which we've been getting on X-Raps. Muskies have been a little tougher but I was able to put a nice tiger in the boat today on a buck tail just off the edge of a rock reef. Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
RICH SIMAK
RICH SIMAK
Joined: 6/3/2011
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/15/15 3:50 PM CST
Conditions: Partly Sunny Air Temp: 71° - 75° F Water Temp: 66° - 70° F
On Hayward's clear water lakes some smallmouth are starting to show up in classic summer spots such as rocks, logs or weeds around 15 feet. There are still many fish very shallow. They have been worked over thoroughly by now and are quite spooky. The pictured fish were caught on Coffee Tubes in 13 -15 feet. The biggest was 21 inches.


Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/15/15 2:39 PM CST
June 15, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

This year, June 21 is both Father’s Day and the summer solstice – the day of the year providing the most sunlight. Forecasts show another wet week, but rain or shine this Sunday, show dad a good time!

“Musky anglers should fish break and weed edges out to 10 feet with bucktails, topwaters, crankbaits, and gliders,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “Fish walleyes tight to bottom on breaks, humps, and weeds in 15-20 feet with leeches and fatheads on jigs. Catch northern in weeds out to 10 feet with minnow baits, spinners, and walleye suckers on slip bobbers. “For largemouth, work weedless plastics, spinnerbaits, and topwaters around weeds, docks, and structure to 10 feet. Fish smallmouth on hard bottoms and break edges to 15 feet with tubes, spinners, and jigs with minnows or leeches. “Catch crappies suspending along break and weed edges with crappie minnows and plastics on jigs or slip bobbers.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage musky action continues to improve. “Fish fresh green weed edges using black bucktails with orange or green blades. Try topwaters during low light periods. Catch walleyes on jigs and leeches or crankbaits in 12-22 feet on sunken wood near river channels. In the evenings, cast gold or orange #11 floating Rapalas along shorelines. “For northerns, fish thick weeds in the natural lakes on the west side with twitch and spinner baits. Crappies are scattered. Fish weeds in 6-8 feet with crappie minnows and jigs with plastics. For bluegills bedding in shallow water, try waxies, worms, and plastics.” Guide Steve Genson at Hayward Bait says musky anglers caught several large fish in the past week. “Work jerkbaits, bucktails, and topwaters in 5-10 feet on weed flats and weedy bars. For walleyes, low light is best. Use leeches on jigs and slip bobbers or cast crankbaits around weed edges and bars in 8-20 feet. Northerns are hitting spoons and spinnerbaits on weed edges in 10-15 feet. “For bass, work weed beds, lily pads, and docks in 5-10 feet with spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappies are moving deeper, taking plastics and crappie minnows in weeds. Bluegills are moving into spawn. Fish sandy areas in 1-5 feet with small plastics and leaf worms under bobbers.” Mike at Jenk’s says musky fishing should be good with more stable weather. “Work bucktails with chartreuse blades and slow moving topwaters on main lake weeds, probing the shallowest weeds during low light hours. Walleye action is best on deep wood near river channels and shallow humps. Northern action is good on mid-depth bogs and shallow weeds with jerkbaits, spinnerbaits, and suckers. “For largemouth, flip large creature baits into heavy cover with wood and weeds, or cast Texas-rigged stick worms outside these areas. Smallmouth are in rock and wood areas. Fish tight to the bank with topwaters, tubes, and stick worms. “Catch crappies on outside weed edges, deep bogs, and cribs with Beetle Spins and Twister Tails.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says Nelson Lake walleye anglers are catching some nice fish in the evenings. “Fish leeches on floating jigs, jig fatheads, cast shorelines and weed edges with floating stickbaits, or troll deeper water with Shad Raps. For northern, work weedlines and panfish spawning areas with weedless spoons, spinners, floating stickbaits, and sucker minnows. “Bass are hitting noisy swim baits, buzz baits, spinnerbaits, and rubber frogs. Some panfish are still spawning. Use live bait under bobbers, dressed spinnerbaits, floating spiders, and cork poppers.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses northern pike and clear water. “Northern pike pose an interesting management challenge for fisheries managers, particularly in lakes with musky and walleye. Water clarity plays an important role in the success of pike populations and researchers in Canada found that northern pike feed more and grow fatter in clear water compared to turbid water. “This concept holds up locally as well. Pike populations illegally introduced into clear lakes such as LCO, Whitefish, and Round have expanded rapidly and pike are now abundant. Pike also got into darker water lakes, such as Moose and Lost Land/Teal, but have not become as abundant. “This same logic applies to the Chippewa Flowage, where pike are more abundant on the clearer west side compared to the east side.”

Turtles are on the move, so be extra cautious when driving near wetlands from now through August when turtles are especially active. From late May through early June, female turtles migrate to sand or gravel uplands to lay eggs and then return to the wetlands. You can help turtles you see on a roadway, but do not put yourself or anyone else in harm’s way. Pick up a turtle by the sides of its shell – or with large snappers and spiny softshells, have it bite down on a stick or long object – and escort the turtle to the side of the road in the direction it was heading.

Hayward Bass Club’s annual Round Lakes Open bass tournament is Sunday July 28, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The entry fee is $100 per boat, limited to the first 50 two-person teams to register. The 90-percent payout goes to the top five places. Hayward Bass Club holds 10 percent to fund its free Youth Bass Tournament in late summer. Register at Hayward Bait or contact Wayne Balsavich (715-699-1015; haywardbassclub@gmail.com).

FISHING REPORT Muskie: Muskies are active on new green weeds, breaks, and bars in depths to 12 feet. Work in and on the edges of these areas with bucktails, jerkbaits, crankbaits, and gliders. Use topwaters over shallow weeds in the evening.

Walleye: Walleye action is fair to good, with best success during low light conditions and/or early and late in the day. Look for wood, weeds, bars, breaks, and humps in 7-25 feet. Fish in/on the edges of these areas with leeches on jigs and under slip bobbers, and jigs with fatheads. In the evening, troll or cast crank, stick, and minnow baits, especially in shallower water and along shorelines.

Northern Pike: Northerns are active in depths to 15 feet around weedlines, bogs, and spawning panfish. The most productive baits include spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, stickbaits, minnow baits, jerkbaits, twitch baits, and northern suckers under bobbers. Fish deeper water with bigger baits for trophy pike.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth fishing is very good on weeds, lily pads, wood, docks, and other structure in depth out to about 12 feet. The top baits include weedless plastics (worms, tubes, creatures), spinnerbaits, crankbaits, swim baits, buzz baits, and topwaters.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth action is good, but remains catch and release only in the northern bass zone until June 20. Fish are on break edges and hard bottom areas with wood and rock. Plastics (tubes, worms), leeches, and minnows on jigs, spinners, and topwaters are all working for smallmouth.

Crappie: Crappie fishing is good, with fish scattered and moving to deeper water. You will find them on the edges of weeds and breaks, brush, bogs, and cribs in depths from 5-18 feet or so. Crappie minnows, plastics, Beetle Spins, small spinners, and surface baits/poppers can all catch crappies. Fish baits on jigs or plain hooks, with or without slip bobbers.

Bluegill: Bluegill action is heating up with spawning activity. Look for fish on very shallow sand bottoms to fish suspending along the edges of deeper breaks and weedlines. Use waxies, worms, leaf worms, crawler chunks, plastics, and Gulp! baits on small hooks or jigs and/or under bobbers. Poppers and surface baits can also be effective.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992

HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/9/15 3:10 PM CST
June 8, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

Following forecast “issues” the past two weeks, it appears this week the prognosticators covered all their bases! Let’s hope they are correct on the good predictions and (again) wrong on the remainder!

“Warmer weather and a full moon improved fishing,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “Fish muskies along shallow weeds and drop-offs. For walleyes, fish weed edges, humps, and rock in 8-18 feet with leeches, crawlers, fatheads, and suckers. Catch northern along weedlines and drops in 6-10 feet with spinners and suckers. “For largemouth, fish plastic worms, crawlers, and leeches near weeds, wood, and piers in 2-8 feet. For smallmouth, work rocks, points, and breaks with tubes and swim baits. “Catch crappies around mid-depth weeds and wood with crappie minnows, tubes, and Gulp! baits. Hook bluegills around shallow weeds with waxies, worms, and leeches.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage musky action is good despite changing weather. “Work green weeds in 3-8 feet using black bucktails with orange or green blades. During low light, try surface lures. Walleyes are in 12-22 feet on wood near river channels. Use leeches, crawlers, and fatheads. In the evening, cast Rapalas over shallow water. “Largemouth bass fishing is decent in thick weeds on the west side with weedless plastics and spinnerbaits. Catch crappies in weeds in 5-10 feet with crappie minnows and Beetle Spins. Bluegills are shallow and bedding. Use small jigs with waxies, worms, or plastics.” Bob at Hayward Bait says the musky bite is fair. “Bucktails, gliders, and stickbaits work well on weeds in 8-15 feet. For walleye, fish crawlers, leeches, walleye suckers, and fatheads on gravel bars and structure in 10-20 feet. Fish northerns on weedlines in 5-15 feet with northern suckers, spinners, spoons, and bucktails. “Largemouth fishing is good with plastics, spinners, and topwaters in 4-10 feet. Smallmouth action is good on crankbaits and plastics. “For crappies, shallow and deep, use minnows, waxies, and plastics. Catch bluegills with waxies, leaf worms, leeches, and plastics on sand and pebble bottoms in very shallow water.” Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage muskies are turning on before a front and turning off after it passes through. “Musky anglers are fishing suckers off bars or casting small artificials. Fish walleyes on wood with minnows, leeches, crawlers, crankbaits, stickbaits, and Beetle Spins. Northern pike are active in shallow weed beds on spinnerbaits, spoons, and larger northern suckers. “Bass are very shallow, especially on shorelines with wood and stumps. Use spinners, spinnerbaits, frogs, and crankbaits. Crappies are in weed beds. Try crappie minnows, Gulp! baits, Mini-Mites, and hair jigs.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says walleye fishing is best in late evening. “Work rock shorelines and points with minnows on jigs, leeches on slip bobbers or floating jigs, and Rapalas. Fish northern along developing weed beds with stickbaits, bucktails, spinnerbaits, and suckers. For bass, throw surface baits, weedless swim jigs with craw tails, and weedless frogs in/along weedlines and edges. “For crappies and bluegills, jig minnows, waxies, worms, crawlers, plastics, and Gulp! baits, or still-fish them under bobbers.”

Carolyn at Anglers All in Ashland says Chequamegon Bay fishing is excellent for all species. “Trout anglers are doing well trolling from Houghton Point to the Islands. Flat-line stickbaits or use spoons and bait flies to troll deeper. “Walleyes anglers are catching fish from the head of the bay to Brush Point, trolling stickbaits and crawler harnesses or jigging leeches and minnows. Smallmouth bass remain shallow in pre- spawn, spawn, and post-spawn stages. Anglers report success on plastics, spinners, crankbaits, and suckers. “Northern pike, pumpkinseed, and rock bass are mixed in with the walleyes and smallmouth.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses electrofishing myths. “Electrofishing to survey fish really captures anglers’ imaginations, but the realities are less exciting than the myths. “The electrified area is a very small radius of 10-20 foot around the front of the boats where booms deliver electricity into the water, temporarily stunning the fish. Rather than floating to the surface, as people imagine, the fish usually stay at the same depth where the electricity hit them. “The most popular myth is that electrofishing ‘turns off fishing’ for a few days. Only a tiny fraction of fish experience the electrical current and researchers in Illinois found fish started feeding 15 minutes after receiving a shock. “Anglers who are not catching fish after an electrofishing survey may need to start looking for a new excuse!” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says musky action is fair on bucktails, gliders, and suckers. “The mayfly hatch upset the walleye bite on some lakes and the best action is with leeches and crawlers. Largemouth action is good on soft plastics fished slowly on weed flats and breaklines. Smallmouth fishing is hit or miss, with many fish still tending nests. “For crappies, fish shallow weed edges in early morning and late afternoon with small fatheads under bobbers. Look for bluegills around breaklines and weed edges in 6-8 feet.”

The DNR will host a public meeting Thursday, June 11, from 5-7 p.m., at Hayward Veteran’s Community Center, to hear comments concerning the new walleye bag and slot limit regulations. Unable to attend the meeting? Submit your comments to Joe Hennessy at Joseph.Hennessy@wisconsin.gov.

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky action is fair to good. Concentrate on green weeds, gravel, drop-offs, and shorelines in depths from shallow to 15 feet. Baits of choice include small bucktails, gliders, stickbaits, surface baits, twitch baits, and Bull Dawgs.

Walleye: Walleye fishing is good, especially in late evening, though mayfly hatches will start affecting action. Look for fish in 6-25 feet around weeds, wood, rock, gravel, humps, and points. Leeches, crawlers, walleye suckers, and fatheads fished on jigs, Lindy Rigs, or under slip bobbers are all productive, as are Rapalas, stickbaits, crankbaits, and Beetle Spins.

Northern Pike: Northern pike fishing is excellent around weeds, weedlines, drop-offs, and spawning panfish in depths to 15 feet. Use spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, swim baits, stickbaits, bucktails, chatterbaits, and northern suckers under bobbers.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth action is good to very good around weeds, wood, docks, stumps, and breaklines in depths to 10 feet. Top baits include weedless plastics (worms, frogs, tubes, craws), poppers, twitch baits, buzz baits, crankbaits, spinners, and topwaters. Live bait includes crawlers, leeches, or small suckers fished on live bait rigs or under slip bobbers.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth are still in the shallows and fishing is fair to very good (and remains catch and release in the northern zone until June 20). Work shallow weeds, wood, rock, points, breaks, stumps, and shorelines with crankbaits, stickbaits, tubes, plastics, spinners, surface baits, and live bait on jigs or under slip bobbers.

Crappie: Crappie action is best in early morning and late afternoon. Fish dark bottom bays and shorelines and on weeds, weedlines, and wood out to 20 feet. Bait preferences include crappie minnows; jigs with waxies, plastics, Twister Tails, and Gulp! Minnows; tube jigs, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, and Beetle Spins.

Bluegill: Bluegills are nearing spawning and fishing is very good to excellent. Fish from very shallow out to 20 feet on sand and gravel bottoms, near green weeds, and breaklines. Productive baits include waxies, worms, leaf worms, crawlers, leeches, plastics, and Gulp! baits, on plain hooks or small jigs, with/without bobbers, and poppers/topwaters.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

BIG CHIP GUIDE SERVICE
See Profile
Profile
Joined: 9/8/2003
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/8/15 9:29 AM CST
Conditions: Partly Sunny Air Temp: 71° - 75° F Water Temp: 66° - 70° F
Fished yesterday with JT for Walleyes and Crappies on the Chippewa Flowage. Did pretty well for the little time we were out. With a nice west wind and warmer temps, turned the fish on. We boated numerous Walleyes using slips and leeches. Sizes ranged from 13 - 19 inches and all were returned. Working sunken bogs closer to deeper water seemed to be the key. The crappies were down deep as well along with some bull bluegills. Casting out and letting the lure pendulum back to the boat with GULP, on a 1/32 jig, picked off quite a few.

Things are heating up on The Big Chip! Give me a call and get in on this fun and fast action!

Good luck on the water! TC


Big Chip Guide Service
(715) 820-1823
JASON STEWART
JASON STEWART
Joined: 2/1/2014
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/7/15 8:34 AM CST
Conditions: Sunny
Mr311, glad to hear you were able to catch a few on your quick trip through town. Smile

The rivers are running high and quick right now. The area is about 2-4 inches above normal rainfall for the past 30 days.

For two days, I went out with a couple fella's that were not only new to musky fly fishing, but fishing in general. But what the heck, we started casting 10 weights for musky right away. Smile We had good musky action the first day with 7 total musky encounters, but Adam and Rory were having a hard time with the figure 8 concept of swimming the fly around the boat a little before picking it up to cast again. We had a few blow ups right at the boat as flies were being picked up out of the water... Sad But for complete newbies to the game, I have to say they did an awesome job. Rory was the first to say uncle on the fly rod with a sore wrist and shoulder so I switched him over to a bait casting Mojo Musky rod (which he had also never casted prior to the trip) and put on one of my favorite river musky lures, the Squirrely Burt. It's a great lure for the river as it will float back up to the surface when pausing the retrieve, thus avoiding a lot of snags on the bottom. Rory had another musky encounter on the 5th cast of old Burt, a nice fish blowing up on the bait. But yet another near miss. Rory stuck with pounding the shoreline for fish hiding from the high water, and will be able to go back to Texas saying he got to catch a Wisco Musky. Congrats!

We only saw one boat the second day, a turned over canoe being bailed out and gear floating down river. If you'd like to get out and fish Musky and Smallmouth from the comfort and safety of a drift boat, hit me up!

Cheers, JS

[This post was last edited on 6/7/15 at 8:38 AM]
MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/6/15 8:09 PM CST
Musky bite is still going strong on the lakes and rivers here in Hayward, WI. I was able to get out by myself and put a couple nice fish in the bag including a heavy 46" fish on a sucker. I also got a smaller fish on a dyin dawg while fishing with a client. Give me a shout if you're looking to chase some toothy critters. Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
mr311
mr311
Level: General User
Joined: 9/5/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
6/6/15 8:10 AM CST
Fished namekagon fri and sat. Caught 6 smallies one walleye (18" or so) and one pike fri at stain egg landing wading. Sat fishing hayward landing only had one bite. Waded below dam at hayward and got one smallie a northern and a sheepshead. Fished about a half hour or so. Seems like the hydro part of the dam would be better than the rapids side but didn't make it over there. Great river and thanks again to the guys on this post for the advice. I used a jig with swimbait

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