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Hayward Area Lakes, Sawyer County (all postings)

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Fish4Musky
Fish4Musky
Level: General User
Joined: 6/18/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
9/3/15 9:05 PM CST
Conditions: Partly Sunny Air Temp: 81° - 88° F Water Temp: 71° - 75° F
Came up this past Saturday and have targeted Muskie and Northern. First few days were a struggle. My electronics failed and had to target more obvious weedlines and avoided the mid lake structure. Hired Guide Micah Langkamp previous to arrival. Thank the good Lord!! In 2 days of fishing local lakes we had over a dozen Muskie up. Had multiple fish hooked (some were our fault and a few just came unbuttoned). Caught at least a dozen pike and 2 Muskie(one being a beautiful Tiger-my first!). Blades on the Weedlines were key! Very consistent action all day but furious action in small windows. Had a big Tiger come unhooked at the boat right before going into the 8. The best action I've espierenced. I learned some new lakes/techniques and picked Micah's brain. Lol. Thanks Micah, we had a great time!

MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
9/2/15 12:04 PM CST
Past few days of guiding have been very productive for musky and big pike. Baitfish are piled up on the weed edges and the bigger fish are in the same vicinity. Trolling and casting bucktails, spinnerbaits and crankbaits has been the pattern while targeting bigger fish on the breaks. We've been having multiple opportunities and follows while targeting muskies and getting at least one fish for every outing. Feel free to give me a call if you’re looking to get out and do some hawg hunting! Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
9/2/15 11:58 AM CST
couple more pics Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
RICH SIMAK
RICH SIMAK
Joined: 6/3/2011
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
9/1/15 8:37 PM CST
Conditions: Night Time Air Temp: 66° - 70° F Water Temp: 66° - 70° F
It has been very warm in Hayward. It is forecast to remain unseasonably warm through the weekend. Anglers might want to try some night fishing. The pictured walleye was caught (and released) last night just after moon rise on a clear water lake. It was actually still light when the northern pike in the photograph was caught, however pike are sometimes caught at night under a bright moon. Both fish were caught from the weeds.


Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
9/1/15 11:03 AM CST
August 31, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

If the forecast for this week holds true, we will experience a very warm start to September! There are chances for rain throughout the week, but most are less than 20 percent – and that is 80 percent against showers!

Pat at Happy Hooker says musky anglers should fish muskies along weedlines and breaks in 18-25 feet. “Use bucktails, gliders, spinnerbaits, topwaters, and suckers on quick-strike rigs. Northern action is best in 18-25 feet with suckers, fatheads, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, and buzz baits. “Catch largemouth around weeds in 4-15 feet with spinners, tubes, topwaters, crawlers, and fatheads. Fish smallmouth on breaks and rock/gravel with tubes, swim baits, topwaters, fatheads, and small suckers. “Crappies are near weed beds in 8-15 feet and suspending in deeper water. Cast or vertical jig small fatheads while drifting. Fish bluegills along weedlines in 8-18 feet with waxies, leaf worms, crawler pieces, and plastics.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage muskies are still using the weeds. “Bucktails, jerkbaits, and topwaters are productive. In sparse weeds, work deeper edges. “Anglers are catching decent pike with spinners and twitch baits on the west side. Fish largemouth in slop with plastic frogs. For smallmouth, fish rock and wooded shores on the east side with Beetle Spins and jigs/Gulp! baits. “Crappies are on cribs, brush, and sunken bogs in 15-22 feet. Crappie minnows work, but jigs/Gulp! baits are more effective. Downsize jigs and use plastics or waxies to catch bluegills mixed in with the crappies.” Bob at Hayward Bait says muskies are hitting bucktails, Bull Dawgs, Monster tubes, and topwaters. “Walleyes are in 15 feet and deeper and trolled stickbaits, walleye suckers, and crawlers are catching fish. Rapalas work well during low light. Catch northerns around weed beds on crankbaits, spoons, and spinnerbaits. “Action is good for both smallmouth and largemouth on weeds and rock with plastic worms, creatures, and topwaters. Crappies are suspending around cover in 20-30 feet and fishing is good on Mini-Mites and Tattle-Tails. Try small minnows if action is slow.” Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage musky fishing was superb last week on bucktails, Bull Dawgs, and surface baits. “Stay deeper and cast to drop offs and weed edges. For walleyes, use crawlers, Beetle Spins, crankbaits, and minnows. During the day, fish brush, sunken bogs, and cribs. At night, work weed and stump bars. “Fish northerns in weeds with northern suckers, weedless spoons, and spinnerbaits. Catch smallmouth on the east side with minnows, crawlers, spinners, and plastic frogs. Crappies are on cribs and brush, taking crappie minnows, Mini-Mites, and Gulp! baits.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says Nelson Lake walleye anglers should use fatheads, crawlers, Rapalas, and Beetle Spins. “For largemouth, use poppers, frogs, chatter baits, buzz baits, and spinner baits on weedlines, or toss swim jigs, weedless spoons, and plastics into weed beds. Catch northerns on sucker minnows, surface baits, Mepps, and spoons. “Crappies and bluegills are scattered. Drift and bobber fish minnows, waxies, worms, and Gulp! baits at varied depths, or cast small dressed spinners.”

Carolyn at Anglers All in Ashland says fishing is picking up for bass, walleyes, northern, and perch. “Fish smallmouth with sucker minnows on the back side of the breakwall, the rock pile, and tip of Long Island. Anglers are catching northern on large spinnerbaits and stickbaits fished quickly through the water column. “Lake trout fishing remains excellent from the south channel to outer island. Brown trout are moving into shallower water toward stream mouths and the channel inside the Bay. Anglers fishing the Sioux are catching lake run browns, though not in big numbers.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses what musky and pike do NOT like to eat. “Multiple field and laboratory experiments on musky and pike feeding habits have found similar results in their food preferences. The two species strongly prefer fish rather than the insects, crayfish, or other invertebrates many other fish like to consume, but their preferences get even more specific. “When given a choice, musky and pike strongly prefer long-bodied, soft-finned prey such as suckers or minnows rather than deeper-bodied, spiny-rayed fish such as bluegill or crappie. When the preferred prey is not available, they will eat whatever they can encounter. “For musky and pike anglers, the implications are simple: Fish long, slender baits rather than deep bodied baits!” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says mid to late afternoon hours produce the best musky action. “Fish Bull Dawgs, stickbaits, and topwaters near deep weed edges. For walleyes, work leeches and crawlers on weed edges and pockets, gravel, and rock in 12-18 feet. Northern action is good around near-shore weeds with spinnerbaits and crankbaits. “Largemouth are near thick weed beds and mid-depth logs, bogs, and stumps. Fish soft plastics/frogs in late afternoon for the best action. For smallmouth, work finesse plastics near deeper rock and wood in rivers and flowages. Action is decent for crappie, bluegill, and rock bass.”

Fishing Has No Boundaries has received a “Spirit of ADA” award from Disability Rights Wisconsin, based on FHNB’s outstanding commitment to full inclusion of people with disabilities, the elimination of barriers to participation, and the development of new opportunities for cultural expression. The awards recognize Wisconsin companies, organizations, or individuals who positively change and improve the lives of people with disabilities in Wisconsin.

The Hayward Lakes Chapter Muskies, Inc. invites the public to attend its holding its September 1 meeting at Coop’s Pizza in Hayward. Following a 6 p.m., business meeting, special guest speaker Neal Rosenberg, manager of the DNR fish hatchery in Spooner, will give his presentation starting at 7 p.m. For more information, call Mike Persson (715-634-4543).

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky action remains good, with early morning and nights offering the best opportunities. Focus on weedlines, breaks, and drop-offs in 10 to more than 20 feet of water. The most productive baits include bucktails, Bull Dawgs, gliders, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, stickbaits, jerkbaits, tubes, and topwaters.

Walleye: Walleye fishing is best in early morning and evening. Fish are scattered from shallow to more than 25 feet. Work weed beds, brush, sunken bogs, stumps, gravel, and rock with leeches, crawlers, fatheads, and walleye suckers on live bait rigs, harnesses, slip bobbers, and split shot rigs, or cast/troll crankbaits, minnow baits, stickbaits, and Beetle Spins.

Northern Pike: Northern action is decent and improving and you will find them in 8-20 feet in/on/near weeds and baitfish. Tempt them with northern suckers, fatheads, spinners, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, chatterbaits, twitch baits, buzz baits, weedless spoons, and topwaters.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth fishing is good on most waters. Target weedlines/weed beds, brush, bogs, logs, stumps, slop, rocks, and points in 3-17 feet. Top producing baits include soft plastics (frogs, worms, tubes, creature baits), spinners, spoons, swim jigs, crankbaits, spinnerbaits, buzz baits, topwaters, fatheads, and crawlers.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth action is good to very good on/along/near breaks, rock, and wood along shorelines and in deeper water. Baits of choice include plastics (tubes, worms, grubs, frogs, finesse baits), jerkbaits, Beetle Spins, spinners, Gulp! baits, topwaters, minnows, and crawlers.

Crappie: Crappies are scattered, but fishing is good in most waters. Concentrate on weeds, weedlines, brush, bogs, and cribs in 7-30 feet and fish suspending over deep water. Crappie minnows, fatheads, waxies, worms, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, Gulp! baits, and plastics work well, with or without bobbers, or try small dressed spinners.

Bluegill: Look for bluegills along weedlines out to 20 feet, with the larger ‘gills on the deeper end of the spectrum, as well as around brush, bogs, and cribs. Small jigs, teardrops, and plain hooks tipped with waxies, leaf worms, crawler pieces, plastics, and Gulp! baits will all catch fish.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

PETE RICH
PETE RICH
Joined: 6/9/2015
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/30/15 10:43 AM CST
Water Temp: 66° - 70° F
Now that water temps have stabilized musky fishing in the Hayward Area is on fire. Fish have been active all day with the biggest fish turning on after dark. In my last 3 trip we've boated 7 muskies, lost 5, and moved another 6. We even got a double casting. Fishing should remain good and I have a couple days left in early September. please contact me if you want to be put on a great pattern.


Pete Rich Guide Service
(815) 762-3973
RICH SIMAK
RICH SIMAK
Joined: 6/3/2011
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/25/15 10:56 PM CST
Conditions: Cloudy Air Temp: 51° - 55° F Water Temp: 61° - 65° F
Persistent cold temperatures have caused water temperatures to drop significantly. Surface temperatures were in the mid-60's on this stained water lake. The next month will see the best big musky opportunities of the year. Go fishing!


Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/25/15 11:15 AM CST
August 24, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

Cool and rainy to start this week, but a warming trend develops by mid-week through the weekend – though a few “chances” continue for showers and thunderstorms.

“This is the time musky anglers get serious,” says Pat at Happy Hooker. “Depending on the lake, muskies are over weeds in 6-14 feet. Bucktails, jerkbaits, spinnerbaits, topwaters, and suckers will all take fish, with early mornings and evenings best. Fish walleyes on rocks in 20-30 feet during the day. In the evening, fish deep weed edges in 6-14 feet. For northern, fish weeds in 6-12 feet with spinnerbaits and spoons. “Catch largemouth with weedless frogs/topwaters, buzz baits, and plastic worms in weeds, wood, brush, and slop in 2-6 feet. Smallmouth are on rock/gravel in 12-24 feet. Use jigs/minnows or crankbaits. “Crappies are suspending in 10-25 feet. For bluegills, fish weed edges in 4-10 feet with leeches, waxies, and minnows.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage muskies are still chasing bucktails and jerkbaits will start producing with falling water temperatures. “Remember to do a good figure 8 after each cast. Pacemakers are good in the evening. Catch walleyes in 14-22 feet with jigs and fatheads. Northern are moving into the weeds. “Fish crappies on cribs and brush in 15-22 feet with crappie minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits. The evening bite is good along bogs.” Jim at Hayward Bait says musky fishing is spotty. “Work bucktails, Bull Dawgs, tubes, topwaters, gliders, and suckers on mid-lake humps and points in 10-20 feet. Fish walleyes with crawlers, walleye suckers, and fatheads in 15-30 feet, or troll stickbaits. For northern, use spinnerbaits, spoons, stickbaits, and northern suckers on weed beds in 10-20 feet. “Largemouth action is good on topwaters, buzz baits, plastics, and spinnerbaits in 2-15 feet near weeds, lily pads, and bulrushes. Fish smallmouth on rocks, humps, and points in 10-30 feet with leech and crawler imitations, crankbaits, and walleye suckers. “Catch crappies suspending over deep water with jigs and crappie minnows, waxies, plastics, and Gulp! baits. For bluegills, fish waxies, leaf worms, crawlers, and plastics on the bottom in 10-20 feet.” Mike at Jenk’s says Chippewa Flowage muskies should be in and along the weeds. “Cast subsurface baits during the day and topwaters in the evening. Walleye patterns should return to more normal with cooling water temperatures. Try crawlers, smaller plastics, and crankbaits. “For largemouth, work the weeds with spinnerbaits. Smallmouth are active on the east end with plastic worms and frogs, spinnerbaits, and crawlers. “Catch crappies on crappie minnows, Mini-Mites, and Gulp! Minnows around bogs, brush, and cribs, with cribs producing the most action.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says anglers should fish a bit deeper until the water cools. “For walleyes, cast or troll deep divers, snap lures, and crawler/minnow rigs in the river channel, or cast surface baits along rocky shorelines and weed edges. Fish northern and largemouth in and along weed and lily pad beds with spinnerbaits, buzz baits, and swim jigs. “Catch panfish in 8-12 feet with waxies, worms, and Gulp! baits. Add a spinner for casting.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses chub minnows. “At some point, trout anglers who fish smaller streams have almost certainly caught a few chubs. “Chubs (aka redtails, daisies) are large members of the minnow family with big mouths and aggressive demeanors, and are common throughout most of the eastern U.S. In the Hayward area, there are two separate species: creek chubs and hornyhead chubs. “Hornyhead chubs are fascinating. To build spawning nests, they pick up pebbles one by one with their mouths and stack them in a pile in the creek. You can often see these nests as you canoe the Namekagon or other rivers. During spawning, the male develops bumps on its head (hence the name) called ‘tubercles.’ These bumps not only signal the male is in spawning mode, he uses the bumps to defend his nest by ramming into other fish entering his territory. “Unlike trout, chubs are very tolerant of warm water and will overtake a trout stream with degraded water quality.” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says musky success tailed off during the hot and humid weather. “Fish weed edges and mid-depth weed beds with topwaters, soft-bodied baits, and smaller bucktails. Walleye fishing is erratic, with leeches and crawlers fished on weed edges, weed pockets, and deeper gravel and rock bars producing most of the fish. “For largemouth, fish weed pockets, wood, and bog/marsh edges with weedless topwaters and soft plastics. Smallmouth action is best on the rivers and flowages. Work soft plastics and finesse baits around wood near deeper water. Panfish anglers report a few decent catches of crappie and rock bass.”

The DNR eliminated the Class B bear license and increased the Class A license application fee to $4.50. Both residents and non-residents may now participate in specific bear baiting, hunting, and training activities without a Class B bear license. Use the online regulations pages for the most current information.

A number of hunting seasons open in September (see the Upcoming Events Calendar below). Bird hunters should check the Fields & Forest Lands Interactive Gamebird Hunting Tool (FFLIGHT) to locate ruffed grouse and woodcock cover, fields managed for mourning doves, and properties the DNR stocks with pheasants.

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky action is fair, with best success in early morning and evening hours. Target the edges of weedlines and weed beds, mid-lake points, and humps in 5-22 feet. Bucktails, topwaters, jerkbaits, gliders, spinnerbaits, tubes, Bull Dawgs, and northern suckers all produce action.

Walleye: Walleyes are scattered in 5-30 feet on weeds and weed edges, wood, river channels, gravel/rock bars, and shorelines, with some near suspending baitfish (lunch!). Live baits include leeches, crawlers, walleye suckers, and fatheads on jigs, live bait rigs, and slip bobbers. Artificials include cast and trolled stickbaits, crankbaits, and plastics.

Northern Pike: Northern fishing is fair to good on weeds and lily pads in 4-22 feet. Bucktails, buzz baits, spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, stickbaits, swim jigs, and northern suckers under bobbers are all catching pike.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth action is good in thick, heavy cover – weeds, wood, lily pads, slop, brush, bogs, and docks in 2-18 feet. Work these areas with weedless topwaters, spinnerbaits, buzz baits, soft plastics (worms, frogs, etc.), and swim jigs.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth fishing is fair, but improving, on rocks, gravel, wood, humps, bars, and points in 8-28 feet. Artificials include crankbaits, soft plastics (worms, frogs, tubes), spinnerbaits, imitation leeches/crawlers. For live bait, try leeches, worms, and walleye suckers on jigs, slip bobbers, and drop shot rigs.

Crappie: Crappie action is fair to good, with fish suspending in depths from 6-25 feet near brush, bogs, and cribs. Top baits include crappie minnows, waxies, worms, plastics, Mini-Mites, Tattle-Tails, and Gulp! baits on jigs and plain hooks, with or without bobbers.

Bluegill: Bluegill fishing is also fair to good. Look for fish in weeds and on weed edges in 3-22 feet. Best baits include waxies, leaf worms, leeches, crawlers, minnows, plastics, and Gulp! baits on jigs or plain hooks.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

HAYWARD LAKES VCB
HAYWARD LAKES VCB
Joined: 6/3/2008
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/18/15 10:36 AM CST
August 17, 2015 Hayward Lakes Area Outdoor Report Steve Suman

Somewhat wet and mild early in the week (according to the forecast), but Thursday through the weekend looks to be excellent August weather! Enjoy it!

Pat at Happy Hooker says last week’s wind and thunderstorms continued inconsistent fishing success. “Musky anglers are seeing fish and having follows, but catching mostly smaller fish with jerkbaits, bucktails, and topwaters on deep weed edges. Fish walleyes on deep weed edges and rock/gravel bars with leeches and crawler halves. Try crankbaits along weeds edges after dark. “Catch largemouth near logs, stumps, and docks with soft plastics and crayfish imitations. For smallmouth, work deeper hard bottom areas with crankbaits, plastics, and leeches. “Find larger panfish suspending near cover in 8-14 feet.” Guide Dave Dorazio at Outdoor Creations says Chippewa Flowage musky anglers should use Ghosttails with orange, green, flame, and copper blades. “In the evening, work Pacemakers and other topwaters over the weeds. Scattered walleyes offer slow action. In the evening, fish Rapalas and Shad Raps over/along weeds. “Catch largemouth in/over slop on the west side with weedless plastics and frogs. Fish smallmouth along woody shorelines on the east side with leeches and Gulp! baits on jigs. “Crappies are schooling on brush and cribs in 15-22 feet, hitting crappie minnows, tubes, and jigs with Gulp! baits. Fish bluegills in weeds with crawlers, leeches, and jigs with Gulp! baits.” Bob at Hayward Bait says musky anglers should work bucktails, gliders, plastics, and stickbaits on weed beds, gravel bars, and shorelines in 8-15 feet. “Fish walleyes on gravel bars and structure in 10-25 feet with crawlers, walleye suckers, and fatheads on jigs or Lindy Rigs. Catch northerns on weedlines in 5-15 feet with suckers, spinnerbaits, and spoons. “Fish largemouth in 4-10 feet with plastics/scented worms, spinners, and topwaters. For smallmouth, try jigs and plastics, tubes, and topwaters on deep rock bars and humps. “Crappies are suspending in 12-30 feet. Use minnows, waxies, Gulp! baits, and topwaters. For bluegills, use waxies, leaf worms, and plastics on/along weedlines and gravel/rock bottoms in 10-20 feet.” Jim at Minnow Jim’s says Nelson Lake walleye anglers should troll/cast deep divers and minnow and crawler rigs. “Cast rocky shorelines and weed edges with floating stickbaits and jigs with minnow or leeches. For northern, work floating stickbaits, spinners, and spoons close to weed edges. Largemouth are hitting spinnerbaits, buzz baits, frogs, and topwaters. “Crappies are near the bottom and bluegills nearer the surface. Cast small dressed spinners or bobber fish live and artificial baits, varying the depth.”

Carolyn at Anglers All in Ashland says the few anglers braving the heat on Chequamegon Bay last week reported moderate success. “Early mornings and evenings offer a better bite for smallmouth, walleye, and pike. Smallmouth are periodically in their deeper summer haunts, but if not there, try shallow structure. “Trout trolling is good, but with no thermocline in many areas. Start shallow early and move deeper as the sun rises.”

This week, DNR fisheries biologist Max Wolter discusses fish appetites. “Anglers who run into a fish unwilling to take any bait might conclude the fish is not hungry. Is that really the case? “Researchers have done hundreds of studies on the diets of dozens of fish species at all different times of the year. The studies consistently find that at any point in time, half the fish in a lake are digesting something in their stomach and the other half has empty stomachs. “However, just because a fish has something in its stomach does not mean it will not continue feeding. It is very common to find multiple fish, insects, and other prey inside the stomach of one fish. “These findings suggest that a truly ‘full’ fish may not be as common as some anglers might think!” DNR fisheries biologist Skip Sommerfeldt says musky action is hit or miss. “Work bucktails, Bull Dawgs, stickbaits, and topwaters on weed edges. Some of the best times are mid-week, mid-day hours when boat traffic is lightest. Walleye fishing is slow, with fish suspending over/near deep mud flats and rock bars. “Largemouth are in/near woody cover, thick weeds, and lily pads. Use plastics or topwaters in early morning and late evening. Smallmouth are hitting larger plastics near woody cover along deeper breaks. Catch decent crappies and bluegills over mid-depth cover and deep weedlines edges.”

Bonus unit-specific antlerless deer tags are now on sale at a rate of one tag per person per day. Sales continue until tags sell out or the season ends. For information, search “deer” on the DNR website.

Leftover fall turkey permits go on sale Saturday, August 22, on a one per-day basis. Permits cost $10 for residents, $15 for nonresidents, and $5 for 10-11 year olds. For information, visit turkey hunting information on the DNR website.

The free annual Sawyer County Outdoor Projects & Education (SCOPE) Family Fun Day is this Saturday, August 22, at Summit Lake Game Farm. This is an excellent opportunity to interact with outdoor activities and demonstrations by experts on the basics of many outdoor related skills. Registration starts at 8 a.m. Interactive stations open at 8:30 a.m., but close at 2 p.m. during the Gould Brothers Exhibition Shooting, this year’s featured performance. Admission is free, though there is a $5 fee (to cover ammunition) for adults who choose to participate in rifle and shotgun shooting activities. For more information, visit www.sawyercountyoutdoors.com/ or call Chris Wunrow (715) 558-5371.

FISHING REPORT Musky: Musky anglers report sightings and follows, but difficulty tempting bigger muskies. Concentrate on weedlines/edges, gravel bars, and shorelines in 3-18 feet, with some fish suspending over deeper water. Bucktails, Bull Dawgs, gliders, topwaters, jerkbaits, stickbaits, and crankbaits can all produce action.

Walleye: Scattered walleyes offer fair action. Target 8-30 feet near weeds/edges, rock and gravel, mud flats, and mid-lake structure with leeches, crawlers, walleye suckers, and fatheads on jigs, Lindy Rigs, and live bait rigs. Troll/cast crankbaits and stickbaits along weedlines and river channels. Work shallower areas in evenings and after dark.

Northern Pike: Northern fishing is fair to good on/along weeds and weed edges in 3-18 feet with northern suckers under bobbers, spinners, spinnerbaits, spoons, crankbaits, and stickbaits. For trophies, go deeper with larger baits.

Largemouth Bass: Largemouth fishing is fair to very good. Fish slop, thick weeds, wood, docks, stumps, logs, and lily pad beds in 3-12 feet. Best baits include weedless plastics, scented worms, crayfish imitations, spinnerbaits, twitch baits, buzz baits, and frogs/topwaters.

Smallmouth Bass: Smallmouth are scattered and action is fair, but inconsistent. Fish deeper rock bars, mid-lake humps, breaks, hard bottoms, and woody shoreline cover. Top baits include jigs/leeches, Gulp! baits, plastics, tubes, crankbaits, crayfish imitations, twitch baits, and topwaters.

Crappie: Crappie fishing is good, with fish schooling in 8-30 feet on deep weedlines edge, mid-depth cover, cribs, and brush. Best baits include crappie minnows, waxies, plastics, tubes, and Gulp! baits on jigs or plain hooks, and topwaters.

Bluegill: Bluegills are scattered and suspending in various depths from 6-22 feet around weeds, weedlines, brush, gravel, rock, and cribs. Use waxies, leaf worms, crawlers, plastics, leeches, and Gulp! baits on jigs or plain hooks, and topwaters.

Hayward Lakes Visitor and Convention Bureau and Sawyer County Record co-sponsor this report. For more information on area events and activities, visit the HLVCB’s Calendar of Events or call 800-724-2992.

JASON STEWART
JASON STEWART
Joined: 2/1/2014
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/16/15 2:16 PM CST
Conditions: Partly Sunny Water Temp: 76° - 80º F
This past week, I organized a Smallmouth Bass outing for our local Wild Rivers Chapter of Trout Unlimited. Temps are a bit high to be safely fishing trout at the moment, so an August bass outing was in order. We had quite the armada of river going vessels put together - My fiberglass drift boat, a handmade wooden drift boat, an aluminum jon, one canoe, a three person raft, and a kayak. With that many participating we broke up into 3 groups all doing different stretches of river in the Hayward area. Pete in my boat had a fishing experience of a lifetime. I pulled the boat behind a mid river island and dropped anchor for a little lunch break. Pete put his flyrod down and started tossing a small jig hook with a white plastic body. He hooked into something, and my first reaction was “BIG BASS!!!” b/c it wasn’t jumping. Then it’s tail came out of the water near the boat…. I quickly put the bass net away and unfolded the musky net... The musky didn’t have a hook in it, and didn’t let go of the 12” bass T-boned in it’s jaws until both fish were in the net. Smile After everyone had a great day of fishing, we all met up at the North Star Homestead Farms for wood fired pizza and our monthly business meeting. Please check into our chapter page - http://www.witu.tu.org/connect/groups/415-wild-rivers - for information on joining. We are always looking for volunteers interested to conserve, protect and restore North America's coldwater fisheries and their watersheds.

MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
8/15/15 12:35 PM CST
Here's a cool little video of a musky caught effortlessly by client Vic Gagliano here in Hayward, WI. Hope you like it!

I've been working on editing footage for my Musky fishing DVD "Hayward Wisconsin Musky Fishing" which will cover daily & seasonal windows & tactics for putting more muskies in your boat while here in Hayward, WI. The dvd will be out sometime in January of 2016 and will be available through my website along with musky shops all over the country.

Give me a shout if you're looking to get on the water. I have a good number of dates open in the next two weeks. Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
RICH SIMAK
RICH SIMAK
Joined: 6/3/2011
Status: Offline
8/12/15 11:30 AM CST
Conditions: Sunny Air Temp: 76° - 80º F Water Temp: 71° - 75° F
Teamstratos, thanks for your comment. It was really cool to see this fish come to the boat for a young angler. He was all business showed concern for a healthy release. I shared the photo again. Everyone should see it and know when you fish these lakes anything is possible.


Rich Simak Fishing Guide
(715) 634-4933
MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/11/15 4:41 PM CST
few more pics Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
MICAH LANGKAMP
MICAH LANGKAMP
Joined: 4/17/2013
Status: Offline
FISHING REPORT
8/11/15 4:37 PM CST
The past 4 days of guiding the fishing has been decent to excellent.

Muskies have been going on bulldawgs and bucktails. Mid-lake structure and weeds are the locale.

Pike have been on the breaks & in shallow cabbage. Spinnerbaits and shallow cranks have been productive.

Largemouth Bass have been the least active but we're getting them in the pads/weeds and around docks & lay downs. Spinnerbaits & frogs have been the ticket.

Give me a shout if you're looking to do some hawg hunting! Cool


Langkamp's Guide Service
(715) 462-4637
teamstratos219
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Level: MEMBER
Joined: 9/4/2006
Status: Offline
8/11/15 3:35 PM CST
WOW that is a big rascal smallmouth. Rich it must have been a thrill to watch that youngster battle with that powerhouse. Congrats to him.

[This post was last edited on 8/11/15 at 3:36 PM]
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